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Care Home: Merle Boddy House

  • 55 Norwich Road Dereham Norfolk NR20 3AX
  • Tel: 01362694643
  • Fax: 01362699403

Merle Boddy House is a detached building set back slightly from one of the main roads leading out of Dereham. There is parking on the gravel driveway to the front, and it is in keeping with other properties in the area. The home is registered to provide personal care and accommodation to up to 10 adults with learning disabilities. Nursing care is not provided. Accommodation is spread over two floors, with the majority of service user`s bedrooms, and all communal space, being on the ground floor.

  • Latitude: 52.679000854492
    Longitude: 0.95700001716614
  • Manager: Mrs Helen Louise Luxon
  • Price p/w: -
  • UK
  • Total Capacity: 10
  • Type: Care home only
  • Provider: Mid Norfolk MENCAP
  • Ownership: Voluntary
  • Care Home ID: 10634
Residents Needs:
Learning disability

Previous Inspections

This may not be the latest inspection for this service as we are having techinical problems updating from CQC - please check directly on the regulators website for the most recent report; bestcarehome hopes to be back to regular updates shortly.

For extracts, read the latest CQC inspection for Merle Boddy House.

Inspecting for better lives Key inspection report Care homes for adults (18-65 years) Name: Address: Merle Boddy House 55 Norwich Road Dereham Norfolk NR20 3AX The quality rating for this care home is: two star good service A quality rating is our assessment of how well a care home, agency or scheme is meeting the needs of the people who use it. We give a quality rating following a full assessment of the service. We call this a ‘key’ inspection. Lead inspector: Lella Hudson Date: 0 4 1 2 2 0 0 8 This is a report of an inspection where we looked at how well this care home is meeting the needs of people who use it. There is a summary of what we think this service does well, what they have improved on and, where it applies, what they need to do better. We use the national minimum standards to describe the outcomes that people should experience. National minimum standards are written by the Department of Health for each type of care service. After the summary there is more detail about our findings. The following table explains what you will see under each outcome area Outcome area (for example: Choice of home) These are the outcomes that people staying in care homes should experience. They reflect the things that people have said are important to them: This box tells you the outcomes that we will always inspect against when we do a key inspection. This box tells you any additional outcomes that we may inspect against when we do a key inspection. This is what people staying in this care home experience: Judgement: This box tells you our opinion of what we have looked at in this outcome area. We will say whether it is excellent, good, adequate or poor. Evidence: This box describes the information we used to come to our judgement Copies of the National Minimum Standards – Care Homes for Adults (18-65 years) can be found at www.dh.gov.uk or bought from The Stationery Office (TSO) PO Box 29, St Crispins, Duke Street, Norwich, NR3 1GN. Tel: 0870 600 5522. Online ordering from the Stationery Office is also available: www.tso.co.uk/bookshop The Commission for Social Care Inspection aims to:  Put the people who use social care first  Improve services and stamp out bad practice  Be an expert voice on social care  Practise what we preach in our own organisation Our duty to regulate social care services is set out in the Care Standards Act 2000. Reader Information Document Purpose Author Inspection report CSCI Page 2 of 35 Care Homes for Adults (18-65 years) Audience Further copies from Copyright General public 0870 240 7535 (telephone order line) Copyright © (2008) Commission for Social Care Inspection (CSCI). This publication may be reproduced in whole or in part, free of charge, in any format or medium provided that it is not used for commercial gain. This consent is subject to the material being reproduced accurately and on proviso that it is not used in a derogatory manner or misleading context. The material should be acknowledged as CSCI copyright, with the title and date of publication of the document specified. www.csci.org.uk Internet address Care Homes for Adults (18-65 years) Page 3 of 35 Information about the care home Name of care home: Address: Merle Boddy House 55 Norwich Road Dereham Norfolk NR20 3AX 01362694643 01362699403 chrismbh@btconnect.com Telephone number: Fax number: Email address: Provider web address: Name of registered provider(s): Mid Norfolk MENCAP Name of registered manager (if applicable) Mr Christopher Alexander Towndrow Type of registration: Number of places registered: Conditions of registration: Category(ies) : Number of places (if applicable): Under 65 Over 65 10 0 care home 10 learning disability Additional conditions: Date of last inspection Care Homes for Adults (18-65 years) Page 4 of 35 A bit about the care home Merle Boddy House is a detached building set back slightly from one of the main roads leading out of Dereham. There is parking on the gravel driveway to the front, and it is in keeping with other properties in the area. The home is registered to provide personal care and accommodation to up to 10 adults with learning disabilities. Nursing care is not provided. Accommodation is spread over two floors, with the majority of service users bedrooms, and all communal space, being on the ground floor. Care Homes for Adults (18-65 years) Page 5 of 35 Summary This is an overview of what we found during the inspection. The quality rating for this care home is: Our judgement for each outcome: two star good service Choice of home Individual needs and choices Lifestyle Personal and healthcare support Concerns, complaints and protection Environment Staffing Conduct and management of the home Care Homes for Adults (18-65 years) Page 6 of 35 How we did our inspection: This is what the inspector did when they were at the care home This report includes information gathered about the Home since the last Key Inspection (December 2006). It includes information provided within the Annual Quality Assurance Assessment document which the Manager completed in detail. It also includes information gathered during an unannounced visit that we undertook to the Home on the 4th December 2008. Care Homes for Adults (18-65 years) Page 7 of 35 During the visit the Inspector was accompanied by an Expert by Experience. This is someone who is part of the Inspection team and has had personal experience of using social care services. The Expert by Experience was only in the Home for a short time and so was not able to spend much time talking to residents but did speak to staff and had a look around the Home. The findings of the Expert by Experience are incorporated into this report. During our visit to the Home we spoke to the Manager and to several staff as well as to residents. We observed staff Care Homes for Adults (18-65 years) Page 8 of 35 supporting residents, were shown around the Home and looked at a selection of records. What the care home does well The Home is well managed, in a way which puts the needs of the residents first. The staff team know the residents well and work hard to ensure that each resident is supported to make their views and preferences known about the way they wish to live their life. Care Homes for Adults (18-65 years) Page 9 of 35 The residents are supported to take part in a range of activities, including attendance at formal day services as well as using the local leisure facilities. Residents are supported to go on holiday and to take part in hobbies and pursue their interests. The staff team work well together and receive appropriate training and support to carry out their roles. The staff have a good understanding of the needs of the residents and provide Care Homes for Adults (18-65 years) Page 10 of 35 support in a friendly and kind way. Some of the content of the care plans is very good as it is personalised and gives detailed information about how the residents prefers to receive their care. What has got better from the last inspection Care Homes for Adults (18-65 years) Page 11 of 35 Some improvements have been made to the accommodation. The kitchen has been refitted and a new breakfast bar has been put into the dining room to enable residents to make drinks whenever they wish to. Some redecoration of rooms and new carpeting has taken place. A new summer house has been built in the garden. Three of the residents have had their wishes respected about not wanting to attend the day service full time. These residents now have individual support to take part in other Care Homes for Adults (18-65 years) Page 12 of 35 activities of their choosing. The staff team has developed and works well together. Staff feel that the morale is better within the team and that they have adequate staffing levels to support the residents appropriately Care Homes for Adults (18-65 years) Page 13 of 35 What the care home could do better There is a need for further refurbishment and redecoration, particularly in both of the bathrooms as they are bare and institutionalised. There is a need to ensure that all of the care plans are of the same high quality so that they all provide detailed guidance to staff about how to provide support to individual residents. There is a need to ensure that evidence is available of the Care Homes for Adults (18-65 years) Page 14 of 35 necessary checks having been carried out prior to staff starting work at the Home. If you want to read the full report of our inspection please ask the person in charge of the care home If you want to speak to the inspector please contact Lella Hudson CSCI CPC1 Capital Park Fulbourn Cambridge Care Homes for Adults (18-65 years) Page 15 of 35 CB21 5XE If you want to know what action the person responsible for this care home is taking following this report, you can contact them using the details set out on page 4. The report of this inspection is available from our website www.csci.org.uk. You can get printed copies from enquiries@csci.gsi.gov.uk or by telephoning our order line - 0870 240 7535 Care Homes for Adults (18-65 years) Page 16 of 35 Details of our findings Contents Choice of home (standards 1 - 5) Individual needs and choices (standards 6-10) Lifestyle (standards 11 - 17) Personal and healthcare support (standards 18 - 21) Concerns, complaints and protection (standards 22 - 23) Environment (standards 24 - 30) Staffing (standards 31 - 36) Conduct and management of the home (standards 37 - 43) Outstanding statutory requirements Requirements and recommendations from this inspection Care Homes for Adults (18-65 years) Page 17 of 35 Choice of home These are the outcomes that people staying in care homes should experience. They reflect the things that people have said are important to them: People are confident that the care home can support them. This is because there is an accurate assessment of their needs that they, or people close to them, have been involved in. This tells the home all about them, what they hope for and want to achieve, and the support they need. People can decide whether the care home can meet their support and accommodation needs. This is because they, and people close to them, can visit the home and get full, clear, accurate and up to date information. If they decide to stay in the home they know about their rights and responsibilities because there is an easy to understand contract or statement of terms and conditions between the person and the care home that includes how much they will pay and what the home provides for the money. This is what people staying in this care home experience: Judgement: People using this service experience good quality outcomes in this area. We have made this judgement using a range of evidence, including a visit to this service . Admissions are managed effectively with appropriate assessments being carried out prior to admission. Evidence: The Manager said that the Home now has a formalised admission process which includes any prospective residents visiting the Home prior to moving there. There has been one new admission since the last Key Inspection of the Home. Staff said that they had received information about the residents needs prior to them moving into the Home. Care Homes for Adults (18-65 years) Page 18 of 35 Individual needs and choices These are the outcomes that people staying in care homes should experience. They reflect the things that people have said are important to them: People’s needs and goals are met. The home has a plan of care that the person, or someone close to them, has been involved in making. People are able to make decisions about their life, including their finances, with support if they need it. This is because the staff promote their rights and choices. People are supported to take risks to enable them to stay independent. This is because the staff have appropriate information on which to base decisions. People are asked about, and are involved in, all aspects of life in the home. This is because the manager and staff offer them opportunities to participate in the day to day running of the home and enable them to influence key decisions. People are confident that the home handles information about them appropriately. This is because the home has clear policies and procedures that staff follow. This is what people staying in this care home experience: Judgement: People using this service experience adequate quality outcomes in this area. We have made this judgement using a range of evidence, including a visit to this service . The care plans and risk assessments do not contain enough detailed information to ensure that the residents needs are met in a consistent way. The residents are encouraged to make their own decisions in as many situations as possible. Evidence: We looked at two of the care plans. There is evidence that these are now being reviewed on a more regular basis which was a requirement made at the time of the last Inspection. The detail within the care plans is variable. One of the care plans has very detailed information about how the resident likes and needs support with their personal care. This is a very individualised document and provides clear guidance to staff. However the quality of the information is not the same for all aspects of the care plans. For example, the care plan for the same person does not contain any information about dementia for which they have been having assessments. The other care plan that we looked at was of a similar quality with some areas having good clear guidance and other areas having sparce, or no, details. Discussions with staff show that they are aware of the needs of the residents and gave Care Homes for Adults (18-65 years) Page 19 of 35 Evidence: consistent answers about how this support is provided. They are aware of the different forms of communication that the residents use and showed us the alternative formats that are in use, such as the pictorial information board and the use of photographic prompts for someone about the structure of their day. The care plans also contain risk assessments but these are also varied in their quality. Staff spoke to us about risks that have been identified for individual residents and about the guidance in place to manage those risks but these are not all documented within the care plan. There is a lack of clarity and cross referencing between the care plan and the other documentation that is used to record information about the residents day. For example, a separate diary is used to record some information but not on a daily basis, a handover record is used for all residents and there is also a separate activity record. Staff gave good examples of how they support the residents to make their own decisions about situations. For example, one of the residents no longer attends formal day services and has support to access the local community as they were clearly stating that they did not wish to continue at their day service. A key worker system is in place and residents are encouraged to spend time with their key workers. Regular residents meetings take place and residents are encouraged to attend and to raise any issues. We looked at the system that is in place for supporting residents to look after their money. The Company Secretary is a corporate appointee for all of the residents and the residents money is all paid into an account in the name of the organisation and then paid as cash to the resident. The Manager said that the residents have their own bank accounts also. The Manager said that he will look at the guidance available from CSCI to ensure that the arrangements in place are following best practice guidance for looking after residents money. We looked at the receipts and records kept for one of the residents and cross referenced this with the cash held which was found to be correct. Care Homes for Adults (18-65 years) Page 20 of 35 Lifestyle These are the outcomes that people staying in care homes should experience. They reflect the things that people have said are important to them: Each person is treated as an individual and the care home is responsive to his or her race, culture, religion, age, disability, gender and sexual orientation. They can take part in activities that are appropriate to their age and culture and are part of their local community. The care home supports people to follow personal interests and activities. People are able to keep in touch with family, friends and representatives and the home supports them to have appropriate personal, family and sexual relationships. People are as independent as they can be, lead their chosen lifestyle and have the opportunity to make the most of their abilities. Their dignity and rights are respected in their daily life. People have healthy, well-presented meals and snacks, at a time and place to suit them. People have opportunities to develop their social, emotional, communication and independent living skills. This is because the staff support their personal development. People choose and participate in suitable leisure activities. This is what people staying in this care home experience: Judgement: People using this service experience good quality outcomes in this area. We have made this judgement using a range of evidence, including a visit to this service . The residents are supported to take part in a range of activities and to be part of the local community. Residents said that they enjoy their meals and that they are encouraged to take part in planning of menus, shopping and cooking. Evidence: In recent months three of the residents have decided that they do not wish to spend five days a week at the day centre. One has retired, one has semi-retired and the other has one to one support five days per week to access other activities. Residents told us about a range of activities that they take part in during evenings and at weekends. Some also told us that they do not always want to do things in the evenings when they have been at the day centre all day. The Expert by Experience found that residents receive the support that they need to access local facilities and to take part in a range of activities. Care Homes for Adults (18-65 years) Page 21 of 35 Evidence: The Manager said that the dietician has been involved with one of the residents recently and has given advice regarding weight loss and healthy eating. The staff who spoke to us were aware of the guidance. We had a discussion with the Manager about the need to ensure that the residents individual needs and preferences are being considered to ensure that a one size fits all approach is not being taken. Recently a new breakfast bar has been fitted into the dining room which enables residents to help themselves to drinks during the day. They can also make their own breakfast here. The menus are displayed on the communication board in the dining room. Care Homes for Adults (18-65 years) Page 22 of 35 Personal and healthcare support These are the outcomes that people staying in care homes should experience. They reflect the things that people have said are important to them: People receive personal support from staff in the way they prefer and want. Their physical and emotional health needs are met because the home has procedures in place that staff follow. If people take medicine, they manage it themselves if they can. If they cannot manage their medicine, the care home supports them with it in a safe way. If people are approaching the end of their life, the care home will respect their choices and help them to feel comfortable and secure. They, and people close to them, are reassured that their death will be handled with sensitivity, dignity and respect, and take account of their spiritual and cultural wishes. This is what people staying in this care home experience: Judgement: People using this service experience good quality outcomes in this area. We have made this judgement using a range of evidence, including a visit to this service . The personal and healthcare needs of the residents are met. Medication is managed safely. Evidence: We looked at two of the care plans and as already stated in this report there is a need to ensure that, in some cases, the information for staff about how to meet individual needs is made more clear. In other cases the information is very clear and personalised. The care plans contain information about the residents healthcare needs and there is evidence that other social and healthcare professionals, such as psychologists, are involved in the residents care. The deputy manager said that they have obtained the Health Action Plans and intend to introduce these as soon as possible. She is responsible for ensuring that all residents have regular appointments with healthcare professionals such as dentist and optician and that the key workers then support the residents to attend the appointments. Discussions with staff and residents show that the residents know who their key workers are and that they feel happy with their key workers. The Expert by Experience Care Homes for Adults (18-65 years) Page 23 of 35 Evidence: found that the residents are able to choose which staff support them with personal care and can usually have a member of staff of the same gender to do this. He also found that residents make their own choices about what clothes to wear. We looked at the medication system. The medication administration record includes information about how the residents prefer to take their medication. We were told that there are no as required medications at the moment. A look at the administration charts showed that there was a gap for one of the residents but the Home has a system for ensuring that this is followed up with the member of staff responsible. Staff receive training with regard to the administration of medication. The Manager is arranging training with regard to specific needs of the residents, such as dementia training. Care Homes for Adults (18-65 years) Page 24 of 35 Concerns, complaints and protection These are the outcomes that people staying in care homes should experience. They reflect the things that people have said are important to them: If people have concerns with their care, they or people close to them, know how to complain. Their concern is looked into and action taken to put things right. The care home safeguards people from abuse, neglect and self-harm and takes action to follow up any allegations. There are no additional outcomes. This is what people staying in this care home experience: Judgement: People using this service experience good quality outcomes in this area. We have made this judgement using a range of evidence, including a visit to this service . The residents are aware of how to make a complaint. There are systems in place, including staff training, to provide protection from harm to the residents. Evidence: The Manager said that the Home has not received any complaints and that the complaints procedure has been made available in an alternative format but that this is in the process of being updated. Residents told us that they know who to talk to if they are unhappy about something. Regular residents meetings take place and residents are encouraged to raise issues at that time. The Expert by Experience felt that the residents feel safe in the Home. The Manager said that the staff, except for new members of staff, have all attended Safeguarding training. In our discussions with staff they confirmed this and were all aware of the procedure to follow if they were concerned about abuse. Care Homes for Adults (18-65 years) Page 25 of 35 Environment These are the outcomes that people staying in care homes should experience. They reflect the things that people have said are important to them: People stay in a safe and well-maintained home that is homely, clean, comfortable, pleasant and hygienic. People stay in a home that has enough space and facilities for them to lead the life they choose and to meet their needs. The home makes sure they have the right specialist equipment that encourages and promotes their independence. Their room feels like their own, it is comfortable and they feel safe when they use it. People have enough privacy when using toilets and bathrooms. This is what people staying in this care home experience: Judgement: People using this service experience adequate quality outcomes in this area. We have made this judgement using a range of evidence, including a visit to this service . The Home provides adequate accommodation for the residents but some areas are in need of redecoration and updating. Evidence: We were shown around the Home. Last year the kitchen was refitted with a new breakfast bar fitted into the dining room. One of the toilet areas has been redecorated but the lock on the door is broken. A new summer house has been built in the small garden area. The residents have a choice of two lounges and there is also a separate dining room. The Home has one bathroom and one shower room. The residents have a sink in their room but none of the rooms are en-suite. Two bedrooms are shared rooms. The bedrooms show that the residents are encouraged to personalise them in their own style. The bedrooms have locks on the door but most residents choose not to lock their doors. The Manager said that the laundry room is due to be refurbished in the next few months and that a new boiler has already been fitted. The bathrooms are in particular need for refurbishment. Both of these rooms are institutional and functional and are not nice bathrooms for the residents to use. There is a need for new windows in the Care Homes for Adults (18-65 years) Page 26 of 35 Evidence: bathroom. Care Homes for Adults (18-65 years) Page 27 of 35 Staffing These are the outcomes that people staying in care homes should experience. They reflect the things that people have said are important to them: People have safe and appropriate support as there are enough competent, qualified staff on duty at all times. They have confidence in the staff at the home because checks have been done to make sure that they are suitable. People’s needs are met and they are supported because staff get the right training, supervision and support they need from their managers. People are supported by an effective staff team who understand and do what is expected of them. This is what people staying in this care home experience: Judgement: People using this service experience good quality outcomes in this area. We have made this judgement using a range of evidence, including a visit to this service . Staff receive appropriate training and support to carry out their roles effectively. Evidence: Discussions with the Manager and staff show that there are usually three members of staff on duty in the mornings and evenings and at weekends. In addition to this two of the residents have one to one support at different times during the day and there are two volunteers who also provide some support. Staff said that they feel that the staffing levels are adequate to meet the needs of the residents and that there is a lot of flexibility about staffing hours to ensure that they are around when the residents need them. Residents told us that the staff are nice and that they like them. We observed staff supporting residents in a kind and friendly manner. The staff clearly enjoy working with the residents and have a good understanding of their needs. The Expert by Experience noted that the staff were very friendly. The Manager said that there are currently two part time vacancies and that there have been several new members of staff recently recruited. He said that staff cover is provided by their internal staff bank and that agency staff are not used. We looked at a selection of staff files and saw that there were some gaps in the Care Homes for Adults (18-65 years) Page 28 of 35 Evidence: information needed. This related to staff who had worked at the Home for some time and the necessary checks were present for the newer members of staff. Staff who spoke to us confirmed that relevant checks had been carried out prior to them starting work at the Home. At the last Inspection a requirement had been made to ensure that all of the necessary information was included in the staff files but this requirement has not been met. The Manager said that the confusion may have arisen as recruitment is dealt with by head office rather than directly by the manager of the Home. Discussions with staff confirm the information from the Manager about the fact that they have all attended mandatory training and that all staff have either completed or are registered to do NVQ training. Additional training with regard to individual residents needs is being planned, this includes training about dementia as at least two of the residents have been assessed as having early signs of dementia. Supervisions are provided by the Manager and deputy manager. Staff said that they feel that they are well supported and that they are able to talk to either of the managers if they need to. Care Homes for Adults (18-65 years) Page 29 of 35 Conduct and management of the home These are the outcomes that people staying in care homes should experience. They reflect the things that people have said are important to them: People have confidence in the care home because it is run and managed appropriately. People’s opinions are central to how the home develops and reviews their practice, as the home has appropriate ways of making sure they continue to get things right. The environment is safe for people and staff because health and safety practices are carried out. People get the right support from the care home because the manager runs it appropriately, with an open approach that makes them feel valued and respected. They are safeguarded because the home follows clear financial and accounting procedures, keeps records appropriately and makes sure staff understand the way things should be done. This is what people staying in this care home experience: Judgement: People using this service experience good quality outcomes in this area. We have made this judgement using a range of evidence, including a visit to this service . The Home is well managed in a way that puts the interests of the residents first. The residents views of the service are regularly sought. The health and safety of the residents and staff is given a high priority Evidence: The Manager has completed the relevant managers qualifications and has several years experience of managing this Home. The Home also has a deputy manager and the staff told us that the management team are approachable and supportive. The Manager is currently spending part of his time involved in service development for the organisation but the staff said that he still spends a lot of time in the Home and will provide direct support to the residents when needed. Discussions with the Manager show that he clearly has a good understanding of the needs of the residents. He also has a good understanding of the dynamics of the staff team and how best to manage these. Staff told us that the morale in the team has improved greatly over the last few months and that they all work well together. The Manager and the deputy attend mandatory training as well as additional relevant Care Homes for Adults (18-65 years) Page 30 of 35 Evidence: training. For example, they have both recently attended training about the Mental Capacity Act. The Manager said that the Trustees carry out monthly visits to the Home as per Regulation 26 but that the reports of these visits are not kept at the Home. The Annual Quality Assurance Assessment was completed in detail by the Manager and provides good information about the quality of the service provided. He also said that the Trustees carry out a quarterly quality assurance audit and that they intend to introduce the use of questionnaires. We looked at a selection of health and safety records and these show that regular maintenance and servicing of equipment takes place. The Expert by Experience feels that the residents are aware of what to do in the event of a fire. The Manager said that window restrictors are fitted to the first floor windows. Care Homes for Adults (18-65 years) Page 31 of 35 Are there any outstanding requirements from the last inspection? Yes  No  Outstanding statutory requirements These are requirements that were set at the previous inspection, but have still not been met. They say what the registered person had to do to meet the Care Standards Act 2000, Care Homes Regulations 2001 and the National Minimum Standards. No Standard Regulation Requirement Timescale for action 1 34 19 The information set out in Schedule 2 of the Care Homes Regulations 2001 must be kept in the home and be available for inspection. 28/02/2007 Care Homes for Adults (18-65 years) Page 32 of 35 Requirements and recommendations from this inspection Immediate requirements: These are immediate requirements that were set on the day we visited this care home. The registered person had to meet these within 48 hours. No Standard Regulation Description Timescale for action Statutory requirements These requirements set out what the registered person must do to meet the Care Standards Act 2000, Care Homes Regulations 2001 and the National Minimum Standards. The registered person(s) must do this within the timescales we have set No Standard Regulation Description Timescale for action 1 6 15 It is required that the care 30/01/2009 plans and risk assessments contain detailed guidance for staff This is to ensure that the residents needs are met in a consistent way 2 27 23 It is required that the lock on 09/01/2009 the toilet door is mended To ensure that the privacy of the residents is respected 3 27 23 It is required that the 31/03/2009 bathroom and shower room are redecorated and that any refurbishment needed is carried out To ensure that the residents have bathrooms which are homely and nice rooms to be in Care Homes for Adults (18-65 years) Page 33 of 35 4 34 19 It is required that the information listed in Schedule Two of the Care Homes Regulations is kept for all staff 05/01/2009 To ensure that the necessary checks are carried out prior to staff working at the Home Recommendations These recommendations are taken from the best practice described in the National Minimum Standards and the registered person(s) should consider them as a way of improving their service. No Refer to Standard Good Practice Recommendations 1 6 It is recommended that the format of recording information about the residents is reviewed to ensure that the information is clear and that if several records are used then there is a system of cross referencing. It is recommended that the Manager review the arrangements for looking after the residents money to ensure that they follow best practice guidance It is recommended that redecoration takes place in the areas of the Home in need of it 2 7 3 24 Care Homes for Adults (18-65 years) Page 34 of 35 Helpline: Telephone: 0845 015 0120 or 0191 233 3323 Textphone : 0845 015 2255 or 0191 233 3588 Email: enquiries@csci.gsi.gov.uk Web:www.csci.org.uk We want people to be able to access this information. If you would like a summary in a different format or language please contact our helpline or go to our website. Copyright © (2008) Commission for Social Care Inspection (CSCI). This publication may be reproduced in whole or in part, free of charge, in any format or medium provided that it is not used for commercial gain. This consent is subject to the material being reproduced accurately and on proviso that it is not used in a derogatory manner or misleading context. The material should be acknowledged as CSCI copyright, with the title and date of publication of the document specified. Care Homes for Adults (18-65 years) Page 35 of 35 - Please note that this information is included on www.bestcarehome.co.uk under license from the regulator. Re-publishing this information is in breach of the terms of use of that website. Discrete codes and changes have been inserted throughout the textual data shown on the site that will provide incontrovertable proof of copying in the event this information is re-published on other websites. The policy of www.bestcarehome.co.uk is to use all legal avenues to pursue such offenders, including recovery of costs. 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