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Care Home: Merrill House

  • Merrill House Queensferry Gardens Shelton Lock Derby Derbyshire DE24 9JR
  • Tel: 01332718400
  • Fax: 01332718400

Merrill House provides personal care and support for up to forty older persons, both male and female. It is located in a busy residential area in the South of Derby, close to shops, local amenities and bus routes. The building is purpose built and the accommodation is provided over two floors, and access is gained via the passenger lift, chairlift and stairs. There are three wings, each providing a lounge and dining area, and toilets are located close by along a corridor. There are forty single rooms, although none of these have en-suite facilities. There are suitably adapted bathroom facilities located on each wing and each floor, and a shower room is also available. The building provides level access and is therefore accessible throughout to assist those people with mobility problems. There are emergency call systems located in all private and communal areas accessed by people who live at the home. There is a patio and lawned area surrounding the building with seating areas provided. The home has a smoking room, which is located on the first floor. The fees currently are £318.00 per week per person, but each person would have a financial assessment and would be consulted about this fees. People who might want to live at Merrill House can obtain information about the home direct from them, and this would include seeing previous inspection reports prepared by the Commission for Social Care Inspection, which are on display in the foyer and lounges. In addition information about Merrill House and the services it provides can be found at the following web site: www.derby.gov.uk.

  • Latitude: 52.881999969482
    Longitude: -1.4520000219345
  • Manager: Sharon O`Connell
  • Price p/w: £318
  • UK
  • Total Capacity: 40
  • Type: Care home only
  • Provider: Derby City Council
  • Ownership: Local Authority
  • Care Home ID: 10648
Residents Needs:
Old age, not falling within any other category

Previous Inspections

This may not be the latest inspection for this service as we are having techinical problems updating from CQC - please check directly on the regulators website for the most recent report; bestcarehome hopes to be back to regular updates shortly.

For extracts, read the latest CQC inspection for Merrill House.

CARE HOMES FOR OLDER PEOPLE Merrill House Merrill House Queensferry Gardens Shelton Lock Derby Derbyshire DE24 9JR Lead Inspector Rob Cooper Unannounced Inspection 19th August 2008 09:50 X10015.doc Version 1.40 Page 1 The Commission for Social Care Inspection aims to: • • • • Put the people who use social care first Improve services and stamp out bad practice Be an expert voice on social care Practise what we preach in our own organisation Reader Information Document Purpose Author Audience Further copies from Copyright Inspection Report CSCI General Public 0870 240 7535 (telephone order line) This report is copyright Commission for Social Care Inspection (CSCI) and may only be used in its entirety. Extracts may not be used or reproduced without the express permission of CSCI www.csci.org.uk Internet address Merrill House DS0000035949.V370859.R01.S.doc Version 5.2 Page 2 This is a report of an inspection to assess whether services are meeting the needs of people who use them. The legal basis for conducting inspections is the Care Standards Act 2000 and the relevant National Minimum Standards for this establishment are those for Care Homes for Older People. They can be found at www.dh.gov.uk or obtained from The Stationery Office (TSO) PO Box 29, St Crispins, Duke Street, Norwich, NR3 1GN. Tel: 0870 600 5522. Online ordering: www.tso.co.uk/bookshop This report is a public document. Extracts may not be used or reproduced without the prior permission of the Commission for Social Care Inspection. Merrill House DS0000035949.V370859.R01.S.doc Version 5.2 Page 3 SERVICE INFORMATION Name of service Merrill House Address Merrill House Queensferry Gardens Shelton Lock Derby Derbyshire DE24 9JR 01332 718400 F/P 01332 718400 Telephone number Fax number Email address Provider Web address Name of registered provider(s)/company (if applicable) Name of registered manager (if applicable) Type of registration No. of places registered (if applicable) Derby.gov.uk Derby City Council Christine Ann Flower Care Home 40 Category(ies) of Old age, not falling within any other category registration, with number (40) of places Merrill House DS0000035949.V370859.R01.S.doc Version 5.2 Page 4 SERVICE INFORMATION Conditions of registration: Date of last inspection 14th August 2007 Brief Description of the Service: Merrill House provides personal care and support for up to forty older persons, both male and female. It is located in a busy residential area in the South of Derby, close to shops, local amenities and bus routes. The building is purpose built and the accommodation is provided over two floors, and access is gained via the passenger lift, chairlift and stairs. There are three wings, each providing a lounge and dining area, and toilets are located close by along a corridor. There are forty single rooms, although none of these have en-suite facilities. There are suitably adapted bathroom facilities located on each wing and each floor, and a shower room is also available. The building provides level access and is therefore accessible throughout to assist those people with mobility problems. There are emergency call systems located in all private and communal areas accessed by people who live at the home. There is a patio and lawned area surrounding the building with seating areas provided. The home has a smoking room, which is located on the first floor. The fees currently are £318.00 per week per person, but each person would have a financial assessment and would be consulted about this fees. People who might want to live at Merrill House can obtain information about the home direct from them, and this would include seeing previous inspection reports prepared by the Commission for Social Care Inspection, which are on display in the foyer and lounges. In addition information about Merrill House and the services it provides can be found at the following web site: www.derby.gov.uk. Merrill House DS0000035949.V370859.R01.S.doc Version 5.2 Page 5 SUMMARY This is an overview of what the inspector found during the inspection. The quality rating for this service is 2 stars. This means the people who use this service experience good quality outcomes. This was an unannounced visit as part of the key inspection process – so that no one at Merrill House knew that the inspection visit was going to take place. The visit took approximately five hours through the middle of the day, with one inspector present. In preparing for this inspection, the information that the Commission holds about this care home was reviewed, this included looking at the last inspection report, the inspection record, considering any complaints or concerns that have been made about the service, and reviewing any notifications made relating to incidents that affect the well being of people living at Merrill House. The methods used during this key inspection and visit were to visit Merrill House, where a method called case tracking was used; this involved identifying four people who live at the care home and looking at their individual files and making a judgement about the quality of care they are receiving, and if their needs are being met. This was followed by a partial tour of Merrill House, looking at the activities on offer, and talking to three residents three members of staff about the quality of the service, and their experiences of living and working at Merrill House. We also sent out an Annual Quality Assurance Assessment (known as an AQAA), which allowed Merrill House to carry out a self-assessment; and provide a range of information relating to their service. The AQAA was returned within the frame time asked for by the Commission, and had been completed in a professional manner. Information provided by Merrill House helped to form the judgements in this report. We also sent out ten surveys to people living at Merrill House, and five to staff members working there, asking for views and information, about the home. Of these surveys we have received nine from people who live at the home and two from staff. These surveys have helped with the judgements that we made. The registered manager Christine Flower has left Merrill House, and the acting manager Sharon O’Connell provided much of the information during this key inspection visit. On the day of this inspection there were twenty-eight people living at Merrill House. Merrill House DS0000035949.V370859.R01.S.doc Version 5.2 Page 6 What the service does well: What has improved since the last inspection? What they could do better: Four statutory requirements and five good practice recommendations have been made as a result of this key inspection visits. The statutory requirements relate to: the introduction of ‘person centred’ care plans, which direct staff how to meet individual’s needs. Introducing a programme of activities so that people living at the care home are having their social care needs met as well as their health care needs. The menus need to be reviewed following consultation with people who live at the care home, to ensure that their nutritional needs are being properly met. The acting manager must apply to the Commission for Social Care Inspection to be the registered manager, as it is an offence under the Care Standards Act (2000) not to do so. The good practice recommendations relate to dating any reviews of the statement of purpose and service user guide, so that people will know how upto-date the information is. Care plans identifying people’s wishes at the time of their death should be introduced, to ensure that staff are aware of the wishes of individuals and their families. The menu should be displayed in the dining room, and it should be correct and accurate. All members of staff should receive training in safeguarding adults to ensure that people living at the care home are safe. All members of staff should have a minimum of six formal supervision sessions per year as indicated by National Minimum Standards. Merrill House DS0000035949.V370859.R01.S.doc Version 5.2 Page 7 Currently the activity co-ordinator is off sick, and it was clear that activities had taken a ‘back seat’ with very little being organised on a daily basis. Please contact the provider for advice of actions taken in response to this inspection. The report of this inspection is available from enquiries@csci.gsi.gov.uk or by contacting your local CSCI office. The summary of this inspection report can be made available in other formats on request. Merrill House DS0000035949.V370859.R01.S.doc Version 5.2 Page 8 DETAILS OF INSPECTOR FINDINGS CONTENTS Choice of Home (Standards 1–6) Health and Personal Care (Standards 7-11) Daily Life and Social Activities (Standards 12-15) Complaints and Protection (Standards 16-18) Environment (Standards 19-26) Staffing (Standards 27-30) Management and Administration (Standards 31-38) Scoring of Outcomes Statutory Requirements Identified During the Inspection Merrill House DS0000035949.V370859.R01.S.doc Version 5.2 Page 9 Choice of Home The intended outcomes for Standards 1 – 6 are: 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. Prospective service users have the information they need to make an informed choice about where to live. Each service user has a written contract/ statement of terms and conditions with the home. No service user moves into the home without having had his/her needs assessed and been assured that these will be met. Service users and their representatives know that the home they enter will meet their needs. Prospective service users and their relatives and friends have an opportunity to visit and assess the quality, facilities and suitability of the home. Service users assessed and referred solely for intermediate care are helped to maximise their independence and return home. The Commission considers Standards 3 and 6 the key standards to be inspected. JUDGEMENT – we looked at outcomes for the following standard(s): 12&3 Quality in this outcome area is good; this judgement has been made using available evidence including a visit to this service. People, who currently live at this care home, and those who would want to, have access to detailed information about the services on offer. People have contracts or a service agreement and they receive an assessment, which allows the people to make an informed decision about whether the home can meet their needs. EVIDENCE: Both the statement of purpose and service user guide for Merrill House were seen during the inspection visit. These documents contained useful information about the care home. The information available would allow people living at the care home, and those who might wish to in the future, to make an informed choice about living at this care home. Discussions with three people showed that they had been given copies of the service user guide, and copies were seen in the people’s bedrooms. The information contained Merrill House DS0000035949.V370859.R01.S.doc Version 5.2 Page 10 within the documents is subject to periodic change, but there were no dates to indicate how current the information is, which could be confusing for people accessing the information. As part of the case tracking process four people who live at the care home were identified, and their files were seen, each one contained an agreement from Social Services to fund their placement, and a copy of the terms and conditions of residence. The individual or their relatives had in some cases signed the terms and conditions of residence. Each of the four files that were seen contained a standard City Council formal assessment of need, completed by a social worker before admission. In their AQAA Merrill House said: ‘Care Management assessment prior to admission and completion of person centred care plan and all risk assessments on admission.’ Merrill House does offer intermediate care on an occasional basis. If a person is admitted specifically for intermediate care, they will come with an external health care package to support them, and to ensure their needs are being met. Merrill House does not though routinely offer intermediate care. Merrill House DS0000035949.V370859.R01.S.doc Version 5.2 Page 11 Health and Personal Care The intended outcomes for Standards 7 – 11 are: 7. 8. 9. 10. 11. The service user’s health, personal and social care needs are set out in an individual plan of care. Service users’ health care needs are fully met. Service users, where appropriate, are responsible for their own medication, and are protected by the home’s policies and procedures for dealing with medicines. Service users feel they are treated with respect and their right to privacy is upheld. Service users are assured that at the time of their death, staff will treat them and their family with care, sensitivity and respect. The Commission considers Standards 7, 8, 9 and 10 the key standards to be inspected. JUDGEMENT – we looked at outcomes for the following standard(s): 7 8 9 10 & 11 Quality in this outcome area is good; this judgement has been made using available evidence including a visit to this service. People have their personal care given in a professional and caring manner by the staff, which means that their personal and healthcare needs are being met. EVIDENCE: Each of the files that were seen contained a plan of care. Evidence was seen that care plans were being reviewed regularly, and there were daily entries by care staff, to record progress and any issues relating to individual’s care. There was no evidence of consultation with people about their care plans, at the monthly review, and care plans are not written in a person centred manner. A comment from a member of staff in a questionnaire said: “Sometimes when we receive care plans they can be a bit vague.” All of the files that were seen contained health care plans. The plans included information relating to health care professionals such as visits to the doctor, or by the nurse, and any hospital visits. Three people were asked about seeing the doctor, and they all said that the staff would get them a doctor if they were Merrill House DS0000035949.V370859.R01.S.doc Version 5.2 Page 12 unwell, and if they needed one. Health care plans are not person centred, and the evidence showed that health care records were in some cases very brief. An inspection of Merrill House’s medication systems showed that medication is handled safely. Administration records were seen and found to be complete. Some people living at Merrill House self-medicates, and a ‘declaration of self custody of medication form’ was seen, together with risk assessments for those individuals concerned. All aspects of the medication procedures that were seen showed a clear audit trail for medication, and indicated that people living at the care home were safe. Discussions with two people who live at Merrill House, and observation of the staff working with people generally showed that the staff treated them with respect and dignity. This included observing staff knocking on people’s doors before entering, and speaking in a respectful manner. In a questionnaire received from a person who lives at Merrill House they said: “Whatever the problem, I have found the staff to be more than approachable, supportive and with a caring attitude. Really understanding.” Each person’s file that was seen identified the individual’s wishes at the end of their life, as in whether they wanted to be cremated or buried, however there were no other details recorded, and the information was at best brief. Merrill House DS0000035949.V370859.R01.S.doc Version 5.2 Page 13 Daily Life and Social Activities The intended outcomes for Standards 12 - 15 are: 12. 13. 14. 15. Service users find the lifestyle experienced in the home matches their expectations and preferences, and satisfies their social, cultural, religious and recreational interests and needs. Service users maintain contact with family/ friends/ representatives and the local community as they wish. Service users are helped to exercise choice and control over their lives. Service users receive a wholesome appealing balanced diet in pleasing surroundings at times convenient to them. The Commission considers all of the above key standards to be inspected. JUDGEMENT – we looked at outcomes for the following standard(s): 12 13 14 & 15 Quality in this outcome area is adequate; this judgement has been made using available evidence including a visit to this service. People do not have a lifestyle that reflects their cultural, social and religious interests, and needs, which means that their social care needs are not currently being met. EVIDENCE: Currently activities at Merrill House have taken a back seat to the care needs of the people living at the home. As a result activities are of a tabletop – games and cards variety, organised by the staff around their other duties. Comments regarding activities from two people who live at the home were: “There’s not much happening, and it’s quite boring” and “I watch a lot of television, because there isn’t much else to do.” Observations during the day, showed a great deal of sitting, with very little organised social care taking place. Unfortunately no relatives were visiting during this inspection visit, and therefore it was not possible to speak to any or gain their views. People said that their relatives were able to visit when they wished, and that staff always made them welcome. In their AQAA Merrill House said: “Open visiting for Merrill House DS0000035949.V370859.R01.S.doc Version 5.2 Page 14 friends and family. Kitchenette at their disposal for making drinks. Cold water dispensers. Pleasant seating areas and rooms for private visits throughout the building. Open door policy with access to the manager on duty and Unit Manager can arrange to see people by appointment if not on duty.” Staff were observed to see how well they interacted with the people who live at Merrill House, and whether choices were being offered. Observations showed that choice was being offered particularly around drinks, meals and some activities. Discussions with two people indicated that they both thought they had control over a lot of things in their lives, and that they were given choice. On the day of this inspection visit there was a good choice of meal on offer including a vegetarian option if required. Information related to people’s likes and dislikes was also seen in the kitchen. The food was well presented, and the dining room was attractively laid out for people. Comments received in questionnaires from people who live at Merrill House included: “Meals are too wide apart, very little choice of menus, also very tiny i.e. 1 drink & 2 biscuits between 5:00pm and 9:00am the next day. First cup of tea about 7:30am” Merrill House DS0000035949.V370859.R01.S.doc Version 5.2 Page 15 Complaints and Protection The intended outcomes for Standards 16 - 18 are: 16. 17. 18. Service users and their relatives and friends are confident that their complaints will be listened to, taken seriously and acted upon. Service users’ legal rights are protected. Service users are protected from abuse. The Commission considers Standards 16 and 18 the key standards to be. JUDGEMENT – we looked at outcomes for the following standard(s): 16 & 18 Quality in this outcome area is good; this judgement has been made using available evidence including a visit to this service. People are safe, as a result of the policies, procedures and systems that are in place, and those people and their relatives are confident that their complaints will be taken seriously and dealt with. EVIDENCE: Merrill House has received one complaint since the last key inspection in August 2007. A review of this complaint showed that it had been dealt with in line with the home’s complaints procedure, which is on display in the foyer, and also forms part of the service user guide. Discussions with two people who live at the home indicated that they knew who to complain to, and how to complain, although they said that they had never needed to. Comments received in the questionnaires also indicated that people knew how to complain, and who to. In their AQAA Merrill House said: “Respond quickly to complaints according to specified timescales. Investigate all complaints and follow through to a conclusion. View complaints as a means of recognising when improvement is needed and act upon it.” The Commission have also received one complaint, which has been passed to the City Council for further action. A review of the staff training records in relation to safeguarding adults showed that ten staff had undertaken this training in the last two years. The training is aimed at raising staff awareness of abuse, and issues around abuse and Merrill House DS0000035949.V370859.R01.S.doc Version 5.2 Page 16 through raising those issues, offering people greater protection against abusive practice, while also making sure that the staff understand the correct policy and procedure to follow if abusive practice is found. So it is therefore essential that all members of staff undertake this training. Three members of staff were asked about safeguarding adults training and only one said they had received safeguarding adults training. Merrill House have not had made any safeguarding adults referrals since the last key inspection. In their AQAA Merrill House said: “Adult protection training has now been completed by all staff. New starters attend this as part of mandatory induction courses. Ensuring service users’ legal rights are protected and observed.” However training records do not support this. Merrill House DS0000035949.V370859.R01.S.doc Version 5.2 Page 17 Environment The intended outcomes for Standards 19 – 26 are: 19. 20. 21. 22. 23. 24. 25. 26. Service users live in a safe, well-maintained environment. Service users have access to safe and comfortable indoor and outdoor communal facilities. Service users have sufficient and suitable lavatories and washing facilities. Service users have the specialist equipment they require to maximise their independence. Service users’ own rooms suit their needs. Service users live in safe, comfortable bedrooms with their own possessions around them. Service users live in safe, comfortable surroundings. The home is clean, pleasant and hygienic. The Commission considers Standards 19 and 26 the key standards to be inspected. JUDGEMENT – we looked at outcomes for the following standard(s): 19 & 26 Quality in this outcome area is good; this judgement has been made using available evidence including a visit to this service. People live in a safe, clean, well maintained and comfortable home, with their personal possessions around them, which means that they are living in ‘homely’ surroundings that meet their needs. EVIDENCE: A partial tour of Merrill House showed that it was comfortable and well maintained, with good quality fixtures and fittings. Discussions with three people who live at the care home showed that they thought the home was comfortable and meets their needs. Several bedrooms were seen, and these were well personalised, and homely, all of the people who were spoken with said they felt they had everything they needed, and that they thought their bedrooms were comfortable and the home was well equipped. Merrill House DS0000035949.V370859.R01.S.doc Version 5.2 Page 18 Domestic staff were seen cleaning in different parts of Merrill House during this inspection visit, and discussions with staff showed that there were systems in place for cleaning, and that Merrill House had a good supply of cleaning materials. The building was found to be clean, and smelt fresh. In relation to cleaning Merrill House said in their AQAA: “Maintain and keep in good state of repair all aspects of the fabric of the building and equipment. Ensure good health and safety, COSHH and infection control are maintained with an environmental and fire risk assessment in place and valid insurance.” Merrill House DS0000035949.V370859.R01.S.doc Version 5.2 Page 19 Staffing The intended outcomes for Standards 27 – 30 are: 27. 28. 29. 30. Service users’ needs are met by the numbers and skill mix of staff. Service users are in safe hands at all times. Service users are supported and protected by the home’s recruitment policy and practices. Staff are trained and competent to do their jobs. The Commission consider all the above are key standards to be inspected. JUDGEMENT – we looked at outcomes for the following standard(s): 27 28 29 & 30 Quality in this outcome area is good; this judgement has been made using available evidence including a visit to this service. People living at the care home are potentially at risk due to failings in the recruitment procedures. Staff are competent and trained to do their jobs, which means that the people who live at the care home have staff who are able to meet their needs. EVIDENCE: The staffing rota for Merrill House was reviewed and this showed that there was enough staff currently employed to meet people’s needs. Two people living at the care home were asked about staffing levels, and they said that they thought there were enough staff. Comments received from staff in the questionnaires included: In response to the question ‘what could the service do better’ “Having more staff” and “There has always been an issue with staff shortages but the managers do their best to get cover, and at the moment we are also getting help from home care aid coming in.” The care industry considers National Vocational Qualifications (NVQ) to level II in care to be the basic qualification for staff working in residential care. A review of the staff training records showed that currently only three members of staff don not have an NVQ qualification, and they are waiting to start their training course. Merrill House DS0000035949.V370859.R01.S.doc Version 5.2 Page 20 Derby City Council hold staff recruitment files centrally. A recent review of staff files at the Council’s personnel (Human Resources) department showed that staff had been recruited safely – namely that applicants had filled out an application form, provided two written references and had had a Criminal Records Bureau check. . Discussions with three members of staff showed that they had been recruited in a professional manner, and had undergone the necessary checks. The staff training records showed that Merrill House does have a training plan for its staff. The training records showed that staff were receiving the training to help them to do their jobs. Discussions with three staff members provided evidence of the training courses staff had attended, including training in fire safety, dementia and health & safety etc. Merrill House DS0000035949.V370859.R01.S.doc Version 5.2 Page 21 Management and Administration The intended outcomes for Standards 31 – 38 are: 31. 32. 33. 34. 35. 36. 37. 38. Service users live in a home which is run and managed by a person who is fit to be in charge, of good character and able to discharge his or her responsibilities fully. Service users benefit from the ethos, leadership and management approach of the home. The home is run in the best interests of service users. Service users are safeguarded by the accounting and financial procedures of the home. Service users’ financial interests are safeguarded. Staff are appropriately supervised. Service users’ rights and best interests are safeguarded by the home’s record keeping, policies and procedures. The health, safety and welfare of service users and staff are promoted and protected. The Commission considers Standards 31, 33, 35 and 38 the key standards to be inspected. JUDGEMENT – we looked at outcomes for the following standard(s): 31 33 35 36 & 38 Quality in this outcome area is good; this judgement has been made using available evidence including a visit to this service. Merrill House is a safe, well-managed care home with good systems for ensuring it’s quality in place, which means that people living at the home have their needs met. EVIDENCE: Currently Merrill House does not have a manager who has been registered with the Commission. The acting manager has been in post for several months, but has not yet submitted an application for registration. This should be done with the utmost urgency, as it is an offence under the Care Standards Act (2000) to manage a registered care home, without being registered. Merrill House DS0000035949.V370859.R01.S.doc Version 5.2 Page 22 Merrill House’s quality assurance system relies on questionnaires being filled in by people living at the home, relatives and visitors. Copies of these questionnaires were seen together with evaluation of the results. Merrill House do hold meetings for the people who live there, although they have been rather infrequent, copies of the last three meetings were seen. Regulation 26 visits (these are monthly audits by a representative of the owners’ management team) are taking place, with copies of reports seen; these are part of the home’s quality assurance system. Merrill House has a system for people’s small cash needs. This is operated on behalf of some of them by the staff (dependent on individual choice and their ability to manage the money, or relative’s involvement). Four people’s finances were checked at random. All of the cash tallied with the records, and receipts were seen, which enabled a clear audit trail of the individual’s financial expenditure to be followed. Merrill House has a formal staff supervision system in place, in which staff receive supervision, either with the manager or with one of the other senior members of staff. This is usually in a one to one meeting. Formal supervision offers staff support and guidance in carrying out their work, and is seen as an essential management tool in residential care. Three members of staff were asked about formal supervision, and they all said they felt well supported, and were receiving regular supervision sessions, however the records suggest that staff are not receiving the recommended minimum number of support sessions per year. A range of different health & safety records were seen, including the fire safety records, water temperature checks and the Control of Substances Hazardous to Health (COSHH) records, all were found to be correct and up-to-date, which shows that people are living and working in a safe environment. Merrill House DS0000035949.V370859.R01.S.doc Version 5.2 Page 23 SCORING OF OUTCOMES This page summarises the assessment of the extent to which the National Minimum Standards for Care Homes for Older People have been met and uses the following scale. The scale ranges from: 4 Standard Exceeded 2 Standard Almost Met (Commendable) (Minor Shortfalls) 3 Standard Met 1 Standard Not Met (No Shortfalls) (Major Shortfalls) “X” in the standard met box denotes standard not assessed on this occasion “N/A” in the standard met box denotes standard not applicable CHOICE OF HOME Standard No Score 1 2 3 4 5 6 ENVIRONMENT Standard No Score 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 2 3 3 X X 3 HEALTH AND PERSONAL CARE Standard No Score 7 2 8 3 9 3 10 3 11 2 DAILY LIFE AND SOCIAL ACTIVITIES Standard No Score 12 2 13 3 14 3 15 2 COMPLAINTS AND PROTECTION Standard No Score 16 3 17 X 18 2 3 X X X X X X 3 STAFFING Standard No Score 27 3 28 3 29 3 30 3 MANAGEMENT AND ADMINISTRATION Standard No 31 32 33 34 35 36 37 38 Score 2 X 3 X 3 2 X 3 Merrill House DS0000035949.V370859.R01.S.doc Version 5.2 Page 24 Are there any outstanding requirements from the last inspection? YES STATUTORY REQUIREMENTS This section sets out the actions, which must be taken so that the registered person/s meets the Care Standards Act 2000, Care Homes Regulations 2001 and the National Minimum Standards. The Registered Provider(s) must comply with the given timescales. No. 1. Standard OP7 Regulation Regulation 15 (1) Requirement All people using the service must have an up to date, detailed person centred care plan. This must direct staff on the delivery of care in accordance with the persons assessed needs. This will ensure that people receive person centred support that meets their needs. A programme of social activities to meet people’s interests and needs must be introduced to ensure that individuals social care needs are being met. Menus must be reviewed, following consultation with people living at Merrill House to ensure that people’s needs are being fully met. The acting manager must apply to the Commission for Social Care Inspection to be registered as the manager, as it is an offence under the Care Standards Act (2000) to manage a registered care home, without being registered. Timescale for action 01/12/08 2. OP12 Regulation 16 (n) 01/12/08 3. OP15 Regulation 16 (i) 01/12/08 4. OP31 Regulations 8&9 31/10/08 Merrill House DS0000035949.V370859.R01.S.doc Version 5.2 Page 25 RECOMMENDATIONS These recommendations relate to National Minimum Standards and are seen as good practice for the Registered Provider/s to consider carrying out. No. 1. 2. Refer to Standard OP1 OP11 Good Practice Recommendations The Statement of purpose and Service user guide should be dated to reflect how current the information is, and when it was last reviewed. People should have their wishes identified and recorded in a specific care plan, relating to death and dying. This will mean that all of the relevant information is in one place, and individual’s last wishes can be met. If a menu is to be displayed, this should be in accordance with the options the catering staff will be providing for that respective week. All other menus should be removed as to not confuse people on what options are available. All members of staff should receive training in safeguarding adults to ensure that the people living at Merrill House are safe. Staff working at Merrill House should receive a minimum of six formal supervision sessions per year, with records kept, and available for inspection, to ensure that the people living at the care home are having their needs met. 3. OP15 4. 5. OP18 OP36 Merrill House DS0000035949.V370859.R01.S.doc Version 5.2 Page 26 Commission for Social Care Inspection Eastern Region Commission for Social Care Inspection Eastern Regional Contact Team CPC1, Capital Park Fulbourn Cambridge, CB21 5XE National Enquiry Line: Telephone: 0845 015 0120 or 0191 233 3323 Textphone: 0845 015 2255 or 0191 233 3588 Email: enquiries@csci.gsi.gov.uk Web: www.csci.org.uk © This report is copyright Commission for Social Care Inspection (CSCI) and may only be used in its entirety. Extracts may not be used or reproduced without the express permission of CSCI Merrill House DS0000035949.V370859.R01.S.doc Version 5.2 Page 27 - Please note that this information is included on www.bestcarehome.co.uk under license from the regulator. Re-publishing this information is in breach of the terms of use of that website. 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Click here for links and widgets to increase enquiries and referrals for this care home.

  • Widgets to embed inspection reports into your website
  • Formated links to this care home profile
  • Links to the latest inspection report
  • Widget to add iPaper version of SoP to your website