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Care Home: Norwyn House

  • Charmouth Road Norwyn Raymonds Hill Axminster Devon EX13 5ST
  • Tel: 0129735111
  • Fax:
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5Norwyn is a detached 3-story property situated on the A35 near Axminster, Devon. The home offers personal care and accommodation for up to 5 service users with learning difficulties. It operates as a small, family home where service users and the owners and their family live together. All service users are able bodied so the home is not equipped with aids or adaptations. The communal space is on the ground floor and is made up of two lounges (the owners and their family tend to use one of these), a large kitchen/dining room and a separate quiet/dining room. Service user bedrooms are on the first floor. These are all single rooms.Ensuite facilities are not available but there are shared bathrooms nearby. Support is provided by the owners, one carer and a cleaner. There are local shops and a pub within walking distance of the home and a bus service to local towns. In addition the owners provide transport in the family cars. The house is surrounded by approximately one and a half acres of garden. Ample parking is available. The current levels of fees range from #271.00 to #486.00 per week. Additional information about the home, together with copies of inspection reports, are available direct from the home.

  • Latitude: 50.762001037598
    Longitude: -2.9700000286102
  • Manager: Miss Barbara Jill Anning
  • Price p/w: ~
  • UK
  • Total Capacity: 5
  • Type: Care home only
  • Provider: Miss Barbara Jill Anning
  • Ownership: Private
  • Care Home ID: 11420
Residents Needs:
Learning disability

Latest Inspection

This is the latest available inspection report for this service, carried out on 29th April 2009. CQC found this care home to be providing an Good service.

The inspector made no statutory requirements on the home as a result of this inspection and there were no outstanding actions from the previous inspection report.

For extracts, read the latest CQC inspection for Norwyn House.

What the care home does well This home provides a relaxed and busy family home which people with learning disabilities share with the owners and their young family. It is clean and safe. The manager of the home has a strong background in caring for people with learning disabilities and in managing a service. She has a well developed ethos relating to promoting equal rights for people with a learning disability. For example she ensures that people`s rights to take risks, to make choices and to privacy are upheld. She holds weekly meetings with people living here to discuss items such as meals, activities, outings and plans. She is also completely available to people to talk with when they want to. People living here say they are very happy here and enjoy being part of the family. They say they have no complaints, but know who to talk with if they do. One person does not speak and so the manager talked of how they look for signs of unhappiness or complaint from this person. People say they feel safe and staff have a good understanding of what abuse is and what to do if they see or suspect this. People are supported to identify areas for potential development socially and emotionally, although access to appropriate resources is limited for those people with complex needs. However, the manager continues to look for local resources for the people living here. Currently activities include those associated with family living (including caring for the chickens and collecting eggs), going to a local group specifically for people with learning disabilities and going out on trips. Two people living here go out independently. People are helped to remain healthy by seeing appropriate healthcare professionals, such as GP and specialists as needed. People also enjoy a healthy diet and are asked daily what they would like to eat. The main meal of the day is eaten in the evening. There is plenty of fresh fruit and drinks available. Each person`s aspirations and goals are identified in a support plan and each person is helped to reach these goals. One person for example is going to visit `Gracelands` and another is being supported to maintain contact with friends and relatives. People are helped to make choices and to take control of their lives. For example, each person manages their own monies and medicines depending on their abilities. Staff working here are provided with the support and training they need to develop the skills to care for the people living here. There are usually 1 or 2 carers on duty in the day and then 1 in the evening. At night the owners sleep on the premises. The manager says that staff work flexibly to fit in with the needs of the people living here. What has improved since the last inspection? Since the last inspection the owner/manager has started the process of delegating some tasks to others and has allocated herself designated management time. This means that she can address management issues such as completing and updating risk assessments.Recruitment of staff is more robust and all members of staff now have a police check. Staff have received training in managing medicines and the medicines policy has been reviewed and updated. This means that medicines are now managed safely. What the care home could do better: Staff demonstrate a good knowledge regarding safeguarding adults. However, people living here might benefit if the manager undertakes training from the local safeguarding team. This will help to ensure she is completely familiar with safeguarding procedures and will equip her to provide safeguarding training in the home. The manager has not yet developed a training plan which matches the needs of people living here with the training needs of those supporting them. The manager has not yet further developed the quality assurance system to gain the views of stakeholders other than those people living here and their relatives. In addition, where people need help completing surveys for the commission, the manager provides this. A more independent source would be more appropriate. Inspecting for better lives Key inspection report Care homes for adults (18-65 years) Name: Address: Norwyn House Norwyn Charmouth Road Raymonds Hill Axminster Devon EX13 5ST     The quality rating for this care home is:   two star good service A quality rating is our assessment of how well a care home, agency or scheme is meeting the needs of the people who use it. We give a quality rating following a full assessment of the service. We call this a ‘key’ inspection. Lead inspector: Teresa Anderson     Date: 2 9 0 4 2 0 0 9 This is a report of an inspection where we looked at how well this care home is meeting the needs of people who use it. There is a summary of what we think this service does well, what they have improved on and, where it applies, what they need to do better. We use the national minimum standards to describe the outcomes that people should experience. National minimum standards are written by the Department of Health for each type of care service. After the summary there is more detail about our findings. The following table explains what you will see under each outcome area. Outcome area (for example Choice of home) These are the outcomes that people staying in care homes should experience. that people have said are important to them: They reflect the things This box tells you the outcomes that we will always inspect against when we do a key inspection. This box tells you any additional outcomes that we may inspect against when we do a key inspection. This is what people staying in this care home experience: Judgement: This box tells you our opinion of what we have looked at in this outcome area. We will say whether it is excellent, good, adequate or poor. Evidence: This box describes the information we used to come to our judgement. Copies of the National Minimum Standards – Care Homes for Adults (18-65 years) can be found at www.dh.gov.uk or bought from The Stationery Office (TSO) PO Box 29, St Crispins, Duke Street, Norwich, NR3 1GN. Tel: 0870 600 5522. Online ordering from the Stationery Office is also available: www.tso.co.uk/bookshop The Commission for Social Care Inspection aims to: • • • • Put the people who use social care first Improve services and stamp out bad practice Be an expert voice on social care Practise what we preach in our own organisation Our duty to regulate social care services is set out in the Care Standards Act 2000. Care Homes for Adults (18-65 years) Page 2 of 28 Reader Information Document Purpose Author Audience Further copies from Copyright Inspection report CSCI General public 0870 240 7535 (telephone order line) Copyright © (2009) Commission for Social Care Inspection (CSCI). This publication may be reproduced in whole or in part, free of charge, in any format or medium provided that it is not used for commercial gain. This consent is subject to the material being reproduced accurately and on proviso that it is not used in a derogatory manner or misleading context. The material should be acknowledged as CSCI copyright, with the title and date of publication of the document specified. www.cqc.org.uk Internet address Care Homes for Adults (18-65 years) Page 3 of 28 Information about the care home Name of care home: Address: Norwyn House Charmouth Road Norwyn Raymonds Hill Axminster Devon EX13 5ST 0129735111 Telephone number: Fax number: Email address: Provider web address: Name of registered provider(s): Type of registration: Number of places registered: Conditions of registration: Category(ies) : Miss Barbara Jill Anning care home 5 Number of places (if applicable): Under 65 Over 65 0 learning disability Additional conditions: Date of last inspection Brief description of the care home 5 Norwyn is a detached 3-story property situated on the A35 near Axminster, Devon. The home offers personal care and accommodation for up to 5 service users with learning difficulties. It operates as a small, family home where service users and the owners and their family live together. All service users are able bodied so the home is not equipped with aids or adaptations. The communal space is on the ground floor and is made up of two lounges (the owners and their family tend to use one of these), a large kitchen/dining room and a separate quiet/dining room. Service user bedrooms are on the first floor. These are all single rooms.Ensuite facilities are not available but there are shared bathrooms nearby. Support is provided by the owners, one carer and a cleaner. There are local shops and a pub within walking distance of the home and a bus service to local towns. In addition the owners provide transport in the family cars. The house is surrounded by approximately one and a half acres of garden. Ample parking is available. The current levels of fees range from #271.00 to #486.00 per Care Homes for Adults (18-65 years) Page 4 of 28 Brief description of the care home week. Additional information about the home, together with copies of inspection reports, are available direct from the home. Care Homes for Adults (18-65 years) Page 5 of 28 Summary This is an overview of what we found during the inspection. The quality rating for this care home is: Our judgement for each outcome: two star good service Choice of home Individual needs and choices Lifestyle Personal and healthcare support Concerns, complaints and protection Environment Staffing Conduct and management of the home peterchart Poor Adequate Good Excellent How we did our inspection: The inspection took place over one day as part of the normal programme of inspection. During the visit to the home we spent all our time in a communal area. During that time we spoke with people living here, with the manager and with a member of staff. We also looked at records relating to support plans, risk assessments, medication and recruitment. Prior to visiting the home we sent surveys to everyone living here and all were returned. This information is included in the report. The manager also completed an Annual Quality Assurance Assessment (AQAA), which Care Homes for Adults (18-65 years) Page 6 of 28 helps us to measure the quality of the service. What the care home does well: What has improved since the last inspection? Since the last inspection the owner/manager has started the process of delegating some tasks to others and has allocated herself designated management time. This means that she can address management issues such as completing and updating risk assessments. Care Homes for Adults (18-65 years) Page 8 of 28 Recruitment of staff is more robust and all members of staff now have a police check. Staff have received training in managing medicines and the medicines policy has been reviewed and updated. This means that medicines are now managed safely. What they could do better: If you want to know what action the person responsible for this care home is taking following this report, you can contact them using the details set out on page 4. The report of this inspection is available from our website www.cqc.org.uk. You can get printed copies from enquiries@cqc.org.uk or by telephoning our order line –0870 240 7535. Care Homes for Adults (18-65 years) Page 9 of 28 Details of our findings Contents Choice of home (standards 1 - 5) Individual needs and choices (standards 6-10) Lifestyle (standards 11 - 17) Personal and healthcare support (standards 18 - 21) Concerns, complaints and protection (standards 22 - 23) Environment (standards 24 - 30) Staffing (standards 31 - 36) Conduct and management of the home (standards 37 - 43) Outstanding statutory requirements Requirements and recommendations from this inspection Care Homes for Adults (18-65 years) Page 10 of 28 Choice of home These are the outcomes that people staying in care homes should experience. They reflect the things that people have said are important to them: People are confident that the care home can support them. This is because there is an accurate assessment of their needs that they, or people close to them, have been involved in. This tells the home all about them, what they hope for and want to achieve, and the support they need. People can decide whether the care home can meet their support and accommodation needs. This is because they, and people close to them, can visit the home and get full, clear, accurate and up to date information. If they decide to stay in the home they know about their rights and responsibilities because there is an easy to understand contract or statement of terms and conditions between the person and the care home that includes how much they will pay and what the home provides for the money. This is what people staying in this care home experience: Judgement: People using this service experience good quality outcomes in this area. We have made this judgement using a range of evidence, including a visit to this service. People who come to live here can be assured that staff will have a good understanding of them and what their needs and desires are. Evidence: All the people living here have lived here for a long time. The person most recently admitted to the home was assessed by the manager and this information was added to information obtained from other sources, including health and social care staff. This person visited the home over a period of time so they could meet with staff and the other people living here. This is the normal procedure for people wanting to come and live here. Care Homes for Adults (18-65 years) Page 11 of 28 Individual needs and choices These are the outcomes that people staying in care homes should experience. They reflect the things that people have said are important to them: People’s needs and goals are met. The home has a plan of care that the person, or someone close to them, has been involved in making. People are able to make decisions about their life, including their finances, with support if they need it. This is because the staff promote their rights and choices. People are supported to take risks to enable them to stay independent. This is because the staff have appropriate information on which to base decisions. People are asked about, and are involved in, all aspects of life in the home. This is because the manager and staff offer them opportunities to participate in the day to day running of the home and enable them to influence key decisions. People are confident that the home handles information about them appropriately. This is because the home has clear policies and procedures that staff follow. This is what people staying in this care home experience: Judgement: People using this service experience good quality outcomes in this area. We have made this judgement using a range of evidence, including a visit to this service. Further improvements in the way that care is planned and the way that decisionmaking and managing risks is recorded means that people are enabled to live active and fulfilled lives. Evidence: Each person living here has a plan of care and is provided with support to help them to develop their support plan and to identify their aspirations, goals and the related risks. Since the last inspection the manager reports that further work has been undertaken in care planning and in sourcing opportunities which would help people to enhance their quality of life. We looked at support plans and saw that people living here have differing abilities. Staff work with each person to help them to identify what their needs and wants are and to help each person to reach their potential. Care Homes for Adults (18-65 years) Page 12 of 28 Evidence: Support plans have also been further developed to help identify risks associated with activities and to work out ways of managing these. People we spoke with told us they are very happy with their lives and enjoy the involvement they have in the home. We saw that people living here have the freedom to move around as they please, both within the home and outside. We saw one person had decided to stay in bed as they did not feel well and another decided to stay in their bedroom. This shows that the home has flexible routines and that people make their own decisions regarding their daily lives. We talked to one person about the arrangements for managing their monies, and they told us they are happy with this. We checked two accounts and found these to be easily auditable, that records were accurate and that all receipts for spending are kept. Care Homes for Adults (18-65 years) Page 13 of 28 Lifestyle These are the outcomes that people staying in care homes should experience. They reflect the things that people have said are important to them: Each person is treated as an individual and the care home is responsive to his or her race, culture, religion, age, disability, gender and sexual orientation. They can take part in activities that are appropriate to their age and culture and are part of their local community. The care home supports people to follow personal interests and activities. People are able to keep in touch with family, friends and representatives and the home supports them to have appropriate personal, family and sexual relationships. People are as independent as they can be, lead their chosen lifestyle and have the opportunity to make the most of their abilities. Their dignity and rights are respected in their daily life. People have healthy, well-presented meals and snacks, at a time and place to suit them. People have opportunities to develop their social, emotional, communication and independent living skills. This is because the staff support their personal development. People choose and participate in suitable leisure activities. This is what people staying in this care home experience: Judgement: People using this service experience good quality outcomes in this area. We have made this judgement using a range of evidence, including a visit to this service. People who live here have their rights protected and experience a lifestyle that enhances their quality of life. This includes enjoying a varied and nutritious diet of their choosing. Evidence: This care home is shared with the owners and their young children. This is a busy home with lots of people coming and going, giving it a lively and upbeat atmosphere. In surveys people told us that there are activities they can take part in. Some people living here told us that they can come and go as they choose as long as they tell the staff where they are going and what time they are due back. They say they enjoy this level of freedom. During this inspection one person chose to spend the morning being involved with the inspection, and in the afternoon decided to go out with another Care Homes for Adults (18-65 years) Page 14 of 28 Evidence: person living here. People living here have different abilities. One person, for example, cannot talk or go out independently. This person is supported to go out with assistance and to attend a local activities group for people with learning disabilities. The manager reports that since coming to live here this person is developing more skills and that they are trying to match activities to their progression. Another person living here works and goes out independently. This person has had a lifetime desire to visit Gracelands. It has been arranged for this person to go here with the male owner. Other activities which the men living here can join in with include going to the gym and going swimming. Another person has recently suffered the bereavement of a close relative. Plans are being made to help ensure that this person does not lose contact with other people who live in the same geographical area and with whom they are friends. The home has recently added 12 chickens to the family. Some people living here really enjoy helping with looking after these and collecting the eggs, which are used in the home. Other people enjoy for example helping with shopping and collecting the children from school. This home places a large emphasis on maintaining peoples privacy. All bedrooms have locks and keys and people living here can choose to use them. People are not allowed to enter anyone elses bedroom without permission. Everyone we spoke with and/or who completed a survey told us they enjoy the food served here. The main meal of the day is served in the evening and a record of what is served is kept. There is not a set menu. Instead the home runs like a family home with decisions about what to eat being based on what people fancy and what foods are available. People can choose what to have at lunchtime. On this day one person chose quiche and others said they would like sandwiches. Both options were served. Fresh fruit and hot and cold drinks are available throughout the day and evening. Care Homes for Adults (18-65 years) Page 15 of 28 Personal and healthcare support These are the outcomes that people staying in care homes should experience. They reflect the things that people have said are important to them: People receive personal support from staff in the way they prefer and want. Their physical and emotional health needs are met because the home has procedures in place that staff follow. If people take medicine, they manage it themselves if they can. If they cannot manage their medicine, the care home supports them with it in a safe way. If people are approaching the end of their life, the care home will respect their choices and help them to feel comfortable and secure. They, and people close to them, are reassured that their death will be handled with sensitivity, dignity and respect, and take account of their spiritual and cultural wishes. This is what people staying in this care home experience: Judgement: People using this service experience good quality outcomes in this area. We have made this judgement using a range of evidence, including a visit to this service. People are helped to stay healthy and the management of medicines ensures their safety. Personal support is offered in a way that offers choices and promotes independence. Evidence: In surveys people tell us they always receive the medical support they need. Each person is registered with a local GP and records indicate that regular visits are made to the optician and dentist for example. Care plans provide clear details about what type of support each person needs and how they like to receive this. It also gives details about how each person prefers to live their day. For example, giving information about what time they like to get up and go to bed. People we spoke with told us that they get the support they need in a way they prefer. In addition, the manager demonstrates an excellent understanding of each persons needs and of signs or symptoms of distress or pain. We looked at how medicines are managed. All people are given the opportunity to help Care Homes for Adults (18-65 years) Page 16 of 28 Evidence: to manage their own medicines, within a risk management framework, and according to their abilities. We spoke with one person about their medicines and they were able to tell us all about them, so understood them. They also explained why they could not manage their medicines on their own and are in agreement with this decision. Since the last inspection training in handling medicines for staff has been carried out and the policy relating to the management of medicines has been reviewed and updated. Care Homes for Adults (18-65 years) Page 17 of 28 Concerns, complaints and protection These are the outcomes that people staying in care homes should experience. They reflect the things that people have said are important to them: If people have concerns with their care, they or people close to them, know how to complain. Their concern is looked into and action taken to put things right. The care home safeguards people from abuse, neglect and self-harm and takes action to follow up any allegations. There are no additional outcomes. This is what people staying in this care home experience: Judgement: People using this service experience good quality outcomes in this area. We have made this judgement using a range of evidence, including a visit to this service. People living here are listened to and are safe and protected from harm. Evidence: No complaints or concerns about this service have been received by the commission or the service in the last year. In surveys people told us that staff listen to them and act on what they say. They say they always know who to speak with if they are not happy and some told us this is Barbara or Dougie, the owners of this service. The manager told us that one person living here could not easily complain, and that she and staff observe this persons behaviour for signs that they may not be happy about something. Support plans all contain a place to record any complaints or grumbles. The manager reports that staff receive training in safeguarding adults and one we spoke with demonstrated a good understanding of what abuse is and what to do if they suspect or see this. We talked about how one person is vulnerable to be being bullied when out and how this might be managed. At the last inspection it was recommended that staff receive training direct from Devon County Council. The manager reports this has not been possible because spaces are Care Homes for Adults (18-65 years) Page 18 of 28 Evidence: not available. We discussed the possibility of the manager undertaking training which would equip her to train staff working in the home in safeguarding and she has agreed to follow this up. Care Homes for Adults (18-65 years) Page 19 of 28 Environment These are the outcomes that people staying in care homes should experience. They reflect the things that people have said are important to them: People stay in a safe and well-maintained home that is homely, clean, comfortable, pleasant and hygienic. People stay in a home that has enough space and facilities for them to lead the life they choose and to meet their needs. The home makes sure they have the right specialist equipment that encourages and promotes their independence. Their room feels like their own, it is comfortable and they feel safe when they use it. People have enough privacy when using toilets and bathrooms. This is what people staying in this care home experience: Judgement: People using this service experience good quality outcomes in this area. We have made this judgement using a range of evidence, including a visit to this service. People live in a comfortable and homely environment. Evidence: In surveys and conversations people told us that they like living in this home and that it suits them. They say it is usually clean, although not always tidy. They say it is not tidy because we live here. On the day of this inspection the home was clean and as tidy as a home with an active family living there can be. Records show that there is a maintenance and repair system in place. Some repairs have taken place since the last inspection and some other damage has also occurred. The manager reports that one person can be destructive and they are trying to manage this. We spoke with other people about how this behaviour affects them, and they say that it is just this persons way and that its OK. The manager says there will not be any major redecoration or refurbishment in the near future as they are planning to extend the home and this will create some collateral damage. People told us that they really enjoy the garden and we saw people using this area. We looked in two bedrooms and found that repairs and redecorations as needed had been made. Care Homes for Adults (18-65 years) Page 20 of 28 Evidence: All upstairs windows have restricted openings to prevent accidental falling and people told us that there are regular fire drills and they told us what they do. There is equipment around the home for people to wash their hands to help prevent the spread of infection. All the people living here have undertaken a food hygiene course so that they can safely prepare food. The laundry equipment is sited in the kitchen, and this has been agreed with the Environmental Health Officer. It is in the extension plans to have a utility area where the washing and drying machines will be housed. Care Homes for Adults (18-65 years) Page 21 of 28 Staffing These are the outcomes that people staying in care homes should experience. They reflect the things that people have said are important to them: People have safe and appropriate support as there are enough competent, qualified staff on duty at all times. They have confidence in the staff at the home because checks have been done to make sure that they are suitable. People’s needs are met and they are supported because staff get the right training, supervision and support they need from their managers. People are supported by an effective staff team who understand and do what is expected of them. This is what people staying in this care home experience: Judgement: People using this service experience good quality outcomes in this area. We have made this judgement using a range of evidence, including a visit to this service. Improvement in recruitment procedures and staffing levels together with on going training help to ensure that the people living here are well supported and safe. Evidence: This home is owned and managed by Barbara Anning who lives on the premises with her family. Ms Anning is on duty all day everyday. Her partner works outside the home on a part time basis and tends to take responsibility for maintenance and transport. In addition, he provides support to some of the men living here by for example going on holiday with them or to the gym with them. There are three other staff working in the home. One covers leave, sickness and when the manager is unavailable, and the other two work part time in the home providing support and cleaning. This means there are either one or two members of staff available during the day and one in the evening. At night the owners sleep on the premises. The manager reports that this works well in this home. She says that when the home needs more than one carer on duty, that this is easily arranged. This means that the service can be flexible to peoples needs such as outings or appointments. During this inspection the there were 2 staff working in the home and the co-owner arrived towards lunchtime. Care Homes for Adults (18-65 years) Page 22 of 28 Evidence: We looked at the recruitment files for two members of staff working here. We found that police checks had been undertaken. We noted that one member of staff had been employed without references. The manager told us that the only person who could give this member of staff a meaningful reference was herself. We saw that people living here have relaxed and easy relationships with staff working here. Mandatory training for staff is ongoing and the manager plans to develop staff further so that they take on some of her own roles. There is not a training plan in place. Care Homes for Adults (18-65 years) Page 23 of 28 Conduct and management of the home These are the outcomes that people staying in care homes should experience. They reflect the things that people have said are important to them: People have confidence in the care home because it is run and managed appropriately. People’s opinions are central to how the home develops and reviews their practice, as the home has appropriate ways of making sure they continue to get things right. The environment is safe for people and staff because health and safety practices are carried out. People get the right support from the care home because the manager runs it appropriately, with an open approach that makes them feel valued and respected. They are safeguarded because the home follows clear financial and accounting procedures, keeps records appropriately and makes sure staff understand the way things should be done. This is what people staying in this care home experience: Judgement: People using this service experience good quality outcomes in this area. We have made this judgement using a range of evidence, including a visit to this service. People live in a well managed and safe home which is run in their best interests. Evidence: This service is managed by one of the owners of this service. She and her family live on the premises. The manager has 13 years experience working in care and with people with learning disabilities. She holds the Registered Managers Award and has consistently demonstrated her ability to manage a care home and meet the needs of the people living in it. The manager has a strongly developed ethos relating to equal rights and constantly strives towards best practice. Since the last inspection she has reorganised the way staffing levels are managed so that she can have dedicated management time to develop and maintain management systems. In the AQAA the manager reports that the appropriate maintenance checks are in place and that staff receive mandatory training. People living here confirm that fire Care Homes for Adults (18-65 years) Page 24 of 28 Evidence: drills and checks take place and they, and staff, are aware that some people have a limited understanding of what to do if a fire broke out. Weekly meetings take place where people are encouraged to air their views and where plans are made about what to do the following week and in the longer term. It is at this meeting that the plans for extending the home have been discussed and people living here told us about these. The manager uses the feedback received from people and their relatives to ensure that the home is run in the best interests of people living here. She has not yet extended this to other stakeholders but has plans to devise a questionnaire for health and social care professionals. We also discussed with the manager that in future, where people need help to complete surveys, that she might ask someone more independent than herself to do this. People we spoke with say they like living here and enjoy the family atmosphere. Care Homes for Adults (18-65 years) Page 25 of 28 Are there any outstanding requirements from the last inspection? Yes £ No R Outstanding statutory requirements These are requirements that were set at the previous inspection, but have still not been met. They say what the registered person had to do to meet the Care Standards Act 2000, Care Homes Regulations 2001 and the National Minimum Standards. No. Standard Regulation Requirement Timescale for action Care Homes for Adults (18-65 years) Page 26 of 28 Requirements and recommendations from this inspection: Immediate requirements: These are immediate requirements that were set on the day we visited this care home. The registered person had to meet these within 48 hours. No. Standard Regulation Requirement Timescale for action Statutory requirements These requirements set out what the registered person must do to meet the Care Standards Act 2000, Care Homes Regulations 2001 and the National Minimum Standards. The registered person(s) must do this within the timescales we have set. No. Standard Regulation Requirement Timescale for action Recommendations These recommendations are taken from the best practice described in the National Minimum Standards and the registered person(s) should consider them as a way of improving their service. No. Refer to Standard Good Practice Recommendations 1 23 The manager should contact the local safeguarding team to make arrangements to undertake training in safeguarding people which would equip her to train staff in the home. The manager should consider developing a training plan matching carers training needs to meeting the needs of people living here. Consideration should be given to obtaining the written views of stakeholders so that the manager can demonstrate that a wide variety of views are taken into consideration when considering how well this service meets peoples needs. If people need help with completing surveys, consideration should be given to asking an independent source for this help. 2 35 3 39 4 39 Care Homes for Adults (18-65 years) Page 27 of 28 Helpline: Telephone: 03000 616161 or Textphone: or Email: enquiries@cqc.org.uk Web: www.cqc.org.uk We want people to be able to access this information. If you would like a summary in a different format or language please contact our helpline or go to our website. Copyright © (2009) Commission for Social Care Inspection (CSCI). This publication may be reproduced in whole or in part, free of charge, in any format or medium provided that it is not used for commercial gain. This consent is subject to the material being reproduced accurately and on proviso that it is not used in a derogatory manner or misleading context. The material should be acknowledged as CSCI copyright, with the title and date of publication of the document specified. Care Homes for Adults (18-65 years) Page 28 of 28 - Please note that this information is included on www.bestcarehome.co.uk under license from the regulator. Re-publishing this information is in breach of the terms of use of that website. 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  • Formated links to this care home profile
  • Links to the latest inspection report
  • Widget to add iPaper version of SoP to your website