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Care Home: Woodcot Lodge

  • 12 Rowner Road Gosport Hants PO13 0EW
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Woodcot Lodge is a new purpose built nursing home whose parent company is Southern Cross Ltd. The home is registerd to accommodates 85 people whose primary care needs on admission to the home are old age (OP) and those who have a demential illness(DE). The accommodation is spread over three floors with two large (trolley size passenger lifts that are fire safety rated allowing use during a fire evacuation. There is ample car parking space in the front and to one side of the house. The home is surrounded by secure gardens that have been planted and landscaped. The home is situated in Gosport on a main road next to a health centre and pharmacy and is close to some local shops. Gosport town is not in walking distance but could be reached by public transport, which runs past the home frequently. For fee enquiries contact the home.

  • Latitude: 50.812999725342
    Longitude: -1.1599999666214
  • Manager: Mrs Catherine Jane Bezer
  • Price p/w: -
  • UK
  • Total Capacity: 85
  • Type: Care home with nursing
  • Provider: Southern Cross OPCO (3) Ltd
  • Ownership: Private
  • Care Home ID: 19633
Residents Needs:
Dementia

Previous Inspections

This may not be the latest inspection for this service as we are having techinical problems updating from CQC - please check directly on the regulators website for the most recent report; bestcarehome hopes to be back to regular updates shortly.

For extracts, read the latest CQC inspection for Woodcot Lodge.

Key inspection report Care homes for older people Name: Address: Woodcot Lodge 12 Rowner Road Gosport Hants PO13 0EW     The quality rating for this care home is:   two star good service A quality rating is our assessment of how well a care home is meeting the needs of the people who use it. We give a quality rating following a full review of the service. We call this full review a ‘key’ inspection. Lead inspector: Janette Everitt     Date: 0 5 0 1 2 0 1 0 This is a review of quality of outcomes that people experience in this care home. We believe high quality care should • • • • • Be safe Have the right outcomes, including clinical outcomes Be a good experience for the people that use it Help prevent illness, and promote healthy, independent living Be available to those who need it when they need it. The first part of the review gives the overall quality rating for the care home: • • • • 3 2 1 0 stars - excellent stars - good star - adequate star - poor There is also a bar chart that gives a quick way of seeing the quality of care that the home provides under key areas that matter to people. There is a summary of what we think this service does well, what they have improved on and, where it applies, what they need to do better. We use the national minimum standards to describe the outcomes that people should experience. National minimum standards are written by the Department of Health for each type of care service. After the summary there is more detail about our findings. The following table explains what you will see under each outcome area. Outcome area (for example Choice of home) These are the outcomes that people staying in care homes should experience. that people have said are important to them: They reflect the things This box tells you the outcomes that we will always inspect against when we do a key inspection. This box tells you any additional outcomes that we may inspect against when we do a key inspection. This is what people staying in this care home experience: Judgement: This box tells you our opinion of what we have looked at in this outcome area. We will say whether it is excellent, good, adequate or poor. Evidence: This box describes the information we used to come to our judgement. Care Homes for Older People Page 2 of 32 We review the quality of the service against outcomes from the National Minimum Standards (NMS). Those standards are written by the Department of Health for each type of care service. Copies of the National Minimum Standards – Care Homes for Older People can be found at www.dh.gov.uk or bought from The Stationery Office (TSO) PO Box 29, St Crispins, Duke Street, Norwich, NR3 1GN. Tel: 0870 600 5522. Online ordering from the Stationery Office is also available: www.tso.co.uk/bookshop The mission of the Care Quality Commission is to make care better for people by: • Regulating health and adult social care services to ensure quality and safety standards, drive improvement and stamp out bad practice • Protecting the rights of people who use services, particularly the most vulnerable and those detained under the Mental Health Act 1983 • Providing accessible, trustworthy information on the quality of care and services so people can make better decisions about their care and so that commissioners and providers of services can improve services. • Providing independent public accountability on how commissioners and providers of services are improving the quality of care and providing value for money. Reader Information Document Purpose Author Audience Further copies from Copyright Inspection report Care Quality Commission General public 0870 240 7535 (telephone order line) Copyright © (2009) Care Quality Commission (CQC). This publication may be reproduced in whole or in part, free of charge, in any format or medium provided that it is not used for commercial gain. This consent is subject to the material being reproduced accurately and on proviso that it is not used in a derogatory manner or misleading context. The material should be acknowledged as CQC copyright, with the title and date of publication of the document specified. www.cqc.org.uk Internet address Care Homes for Older People Page 3 of 32 Information about the care home Name of care home: Address: Woodcot Lodge 12 Rowner Road Gosport Hants PO13 0EW Telephone number: Fax number: Email address: Provider web address: Name of registered provider(s): Name of registered manager (if applicable) Mrs Catherine Jane Bezer Type of registration: Number of places registered: care home 85 Southern Cross OPCO Ltd Conditions of registration: Category(ies) : Number of places (if applicable): Under 65 dementia Additional conditions: The maximum number of service users who can be accommodated is: 85. The registered person may provide the following category/ies of service only: care home with nursing (N) To service users of the following gender: Either Whose primary care needs on admission to the home are within the following categories:Old age, not falling within any other category (OP) Dementia (DE). Date of last inspection Brief description of the care home Woodcot Lodge is a new purpose built nursing home whose parent company is Southern Cross Ltd. The home is registerd to accommodates 85 people whose primary care needs on admission to the home are old age (OP) and those who have a demential illness(DE). The accommodation is spread over three floors with two large (trolley size passenger lifts that are fire safety rated allowing use during a fire evacuation. There is ample car Care Homes for Older People Page 4 of 32 Over 65 0 85 Brief description of the care home parking space in the front and to one side of the house. The home is surrounded by secure gardens that have been planted and landscaped. The home is situated in Gosport on a main road next to a health centre and pharmacy and is close to some local shops. Gosport town is not in walking distance but could be reached by public transport, which runs past the home frequently. For fee enquiries contact the home. Care Homes for Older People Page 5 of 32 Summary This is an overview of what we found during the inspection. The quality rating for this care home is: Our judgement for each outcome: two star good service Choice of home Health and personal care Daily life and social activities Complaints and protection Environment Staffing Management and administration peterchart Poor Adequate Good Excellent How we did our inspection: The site visit to Woodcot Lodge Nursing Home took place on the 5th January 2010. For the purposes of this report, CQC will be referred to as we and us. The registered manager was in attendance at the home throughout this visit. The visit, which was the first since this service was registered in October 2009, formed part of the process of the inspection of the service to measure the service against the key national minimum standards. The home sent us their Annual Quality Assurance Assessment (AQAA), which gave us comprehensive information and also some numerical information about the service. The focus of this visit to the home was to support the information stated in the AQAA and other information received by the CQC since the home was registered. Documents and records were examined. Staff working practices were observed. We looked around the home and spoke to service users, staff and visitors who told us that the service was very good and they were well cared for. Care Homes for Older People Page 6 of 32 Surveys had been distributed to service users, staff, relatives and visiting professionals. Eight staff surveys were returned to CQC. Staff indicated that they have good training opportunities, are listened to and feel supported by the management. Five relatives returned surveys and made positive comments about the service. One visiting professional returned a survey and was positive about the care service users receive in the home. Care Homes for Older People Page 7 of 32 What the care home does well: The home has been operational since October 2009 and the home has had a phased admission procedure in place and service users have been gradually admitted since then. The manager undertakes a thorough pre-admission assessment of people before a decision is made about them being admitted, using a criteria that covers all aspects of a persons personal, physical and psychological care. The care plans have been written using a risk assessment base to identify needs and these are reviewed monthly and service users and/or their relatives are invited to be involved with all assessments and reviews. The care plans are detailed and describe how the persons care needs and wishes are met. Service users said when talking to them that they feel they are cared for by very kind staff that are available when they need them. Comments on surveys completed by relatives said: The staff are very caring and kind and nothing is too much trouble for them. They are very pleasant if you wish to talk about problems. The staff are very helpful and caring and always smiling and ask how I feel. Since my husband has been cared for in Woodcot I have found the staff very good and you can talk to them. I am very pleased with the care my husband receives. They put my husband first and there is always someone there is he needs them. They sit and talk to him and interact with him. I would like to thank the staff for taking time and trouble to find out about my husbands needs and implement them. The home is welcoming to relatives and visitors. The food is good and the staff are eager to please and get it right for the residents. The home has an activities programme in place but this will be expanded once more service users are admitted to the home and the manager employs more activities staff, as is planned. Service users told us that the food is good and menus demonstrate a wholesome and nutritious diet with choices at every meal time and snacks available between meals. The home has been purpose build and has been opened for three months. The home has been pleasantly decorated with a good standard of furnishings and fixtures. The home has been equipped with appropriate aids for those who need assistance with their activities of daily living. The staff told us that they were satisfied with their recruitment process and that they have received a considerable amount of training before the home became operational. They say that they receive supervision and are well supported by the management team. Staff spoken to at the time of this visit and from surveys returned to CQC said: I consider the home is as good as it can possible be and as the home is new we are dealing with issues as they arise, quickly and efficiently. Senior staff are very supportive. We are a new home and we are endeavouring to provide quality care for service users and their families. I enjoy working at Woodcot with staff and residents. The staff work well as a team. The home meets the needs of the service users. Woodcot has been extremely helpful and committed to providing person centred care and is constantly checking that residents are happy. Care Homes for Older People Page 8 of 32 The home has robust recruitment procedures in place to ensure service users are kept safe. What has improved since the last inspection? What they could do better: If you want to know what action the person responsible for this care home is taking following this report, you can contact them using the details on page 4. The report of this inspection is available from our website www.cqc.org.uk. You can get printed copies from enquiries@cqc.org.uk or by telephoning our order line 0870 240 7535. Care Homes for Older People Page 9 of 32 Details of our findings Contents Choice of home (standards 1 - 6) Health and personal care (standards 7 - 11) Daily life and social activities (standards 12 - 15) Complaints and protection (standards 16 - 18) Environment (standards 19 - 26) Staffing (standards 27 - 30) Management and administration (standards 31 - 38) Outstanding statutory requirements Requirements and recommendations from this inspection Care Homes for Older People Page 10 of 32 Choice of home These are the outcomes that people staying in care homes should experience. They reflect the things that people have said are important to them: People are confident that the care home can support them. This is because there is an accurate assessment of their needs that they, or people close to them, have been involved in. This tells the home all about them and the support they need. People who stay at the home only for intermediate care, have a clear assessment that includes a plan on what they hope for and want to achieve when they return home. People can decide whether the care home can meet their support and accommodation needs. This is because they, or people close to them, have been able to visit the home and have got full, clear, accurate and up to date information about the home. If they decide to stay in the home they know about their rights and responsibilities because there is an easy to understand contract or statement of terms and conditions between them and the care home that includes how much they will pay and what the home provides for the money. This is what people staying in this care home experience: Judgement: People using this service experience good quality outcomes in this area. We have made this judgement using a range of evidence, including a visit to this service. Service users are assessed and information shared with them before a decision is made about moving into the home, to ensure the home can meet their needs. Evidence: A sample of four service users pre-admission assessments were viewed. These demonstrated that a detailed assessment of the person takes place before any decisions are made about the home being able to meet their needs. The assessments includes all aspects of physical and emotional health care needs. A cognitive assessment is also undertaken at that time. The assessments take into account the equality and the diversity within the needs of each person. The manager told us that a full care needs assessment is received by the home from the care manager with the referral. A care plan is then prepared by the home and is submitted to Social Services for consideration before the manager can visit the person to undertake a full assessment. The manager told us that this process takes place Care Homes for Older People Page 11 of 32 Evidence: until such times as the service has acquired a star rating from CQC. A comment on a visiting professionals survey said Woodcot have been extremely helpful and committed to providing person centred plans of care. The manager told us that in for a number of potential service users there is family involvement at the assessment and information gathering stage, as in many cases the person is unable to share accurate information with the person assessing them. A comment on a relatives survey said I would like to thank the manager of the home who took time and trouble to find out what my husbands needs were and implemented the care he needed. Two service users were spoken with who told us that they were brought to the home as an emergency from their own homes over the Christmas period and were fully aware of the reasons for this. One service user saying she was hoping to return to her own home in the near future, with support, now that she was better, and the other saying that she liked the home very much but was awaiting a room in another home nearer to her friends and family. Both said they had settled into the home very well and the staff were wonderful. The homes Statement of Purpose and brochure giving all information about the home, is given to potential service users or their families when they enquire about the home. The surveys returned from relatives indicated that they had received sufficient information about the home to help them make a decision about their relatives going to the home to live. Care Homes for Older People Page 12 of 32 Health and personal care These are the outcomes that people staying in care homes should experience. They reflect the things that people have said are important to them: People’s health, personal and social care needs are met. The home has a plan of care that the person, or someone close to them, has been involved in making. If they take medicine, they manage it themselves if they can. If they cannot manage their medicine, the care home supports them with it, in a safe way. People’s right to privacy is respected and the support they get from staff is given in a way that maintains their dignity. If people are approaching the end of their life, the care home will respect their choices and help them feel comfortable and secure. They, and people close to them, are reassured that their death will be handled with sensitivity, dignity and respect, and take account of their spiritual and cultural wishes. This is what people staying in this care home experience: Judgement: People using this service experience good quality outcomes in this area. We have made this judgement using a range of evidence, including a visit to this service. The home has systems in place to ensure that the personal and healthcare needs of the service users are met and medication is managed safely and effectively. Service users privacy and dignity is upheld and promoted. Evidence: The AQAA states that each resident has an individual, comprehensive care plan that includes individuals care needs, social needs and risk assessments. A sample of four service users care plan documentation was viewed by us. The care plans demonstrated a person centred approach to care and described in detail how the service users identified care needs were to be met. Risk assessments were in place, where appropriate, for challenging behaviour, falls, nutrition, moving and handling etc, with care plans written to describe how the risk was to be managed. The manager told us that the staff had received a great deal of training on care planning before the home had commenced admitting people and she therefore, felt confident that the staff were knowledgeable on how to use the care plans to inform Care Homes for Older People Page 13 of 32 Evidence: their practice. The care plans covered all aspects of a persons needs and daily records describe in detail how the service user had spent the day and evaluated how their needs had been met for that day. There were records to evidence that care plans are reviewed monthly or if a persons needs change. The AQAA told us that it is anticipated that the care plans will, in the future, be reviewed three and six monthly. For those residents who are able and understand the care plans, they can be involved in the care planning if they so wish and sign to say they have participated in the plan. Care plans are audited by the manager monthly and reported to the Operational Manager who visits the home monthly. Service users are encouraged to choose their own doctor but this may not always be possible because of geographical areas. The manager told us that currently most of the service users are registered with the health centre which is situated next door to the home. The surgery also has the services of a nurse practitioner, which the manager said is very useful if advice is needed. The community psychiatric team have visited the home to review some of their patients and the manager told us that she is well supported by this team and can contact them to give advice and support on existing clients but service users presenting with new symptoms can only be referred to this team via the GP or Social Services. The home has the services of a chiropodist and a dentist from the PCT. The home has received information about a visiting optician and arrangements have been made for them to visit the home. The home has corporate policies and procedures in place. The AQAA told us that the medication policies need to be reviewed and should include a self-medication policy, to allow service users choices if they wish to maintain their own medication. The monitored dosage system is used in the home and is supplied by a large chemist in the area. The ordering of the medication is co-ordinated by the deputy manager for the top floor, which accommodates service users with more advanced dementia and in need of registered nursing care. The ground floor is used as a residential area for those with early onset dementia and is staffed by carers who are not registered Care Homes for Older People Page 14 of 32 Evidence: nurses. A senior carer undertakes the co-ordination of ordering the medication needed for this floor. The deputy manager told us that she does see the prescriptions before they are sent to pharmacy for dispensing to ensure that the home receives all medication that is needed. We viewed the medication systems and storage and observed part of a medication round being undertaken by a senior carer. She was observed to be following safe procedures. The medication administration record (MAR) charts were viewed. Some gaps were identified where signatures or codes should have been recorded. This was discussed with the deputy manager who said she regularly audits the MAR charts and she would identify the person who had omitted the signature and discuss this as a medication error. We identified that on one MAR chart some medication received between regular medication delivery had been transcribed onto the MAR chart. This has not been signed by the transcriber nor signed by a second person to verify it had been transcribed correctly. This was discussed with the deputy manager and suggested that safe practice would be for this to be signed and checked by a second person. The medication is stored appropriately in trolleys that are secured to a wall in a locked room. The other storage cupboards did not identify any over stocking of as needed (PRN) medications or dressings. The home has an appropriate controlled drug storage cupboard fixed to a wall. There were no controlled drugs being dispensed at the time of this visit and therefore stocks and records could not be viewed. All registered nurses and senior carers have received training in the legislation that surrounds medication. Boots have delivered a training programme to all staff on the medication system and management of medication. The training matrix evidenced that all staff have received this training. The home is designed that all service users have a single room with an en-suite facility and this gives them a measure of privacy. Staff and service users were observed to interact well and staff were referring to the service users in a respectful manner. Care Homes for Older People Page 15 of 32 Evidence: Care Homes for Older People Page 16 of 32 Daily life and social activities These are the outcomes that people staying in care homes should experience. They reflect the things that people have said are important to them: Each person is treated as an individual and the care home is responsive to his or her race, culture, religion, age, disability, gender and sexual orientation. They are part of their local community. The care home supports people to follow personal interests and activities. People are able to keep in touch with family, friends and representatives. They are as independent as they can be, lead their chosen lifestyle and have the opportunity to make the most of their abilities. People have nutritious and attractive meals and snacks, at a time and place to suit them. There are no additional outcomes. This is what people staying in this care home experience: Judgement: People using this service experience good quality outcomes in this area. We have made this judgement using a range of evidence, including a visit to this service. A range of social activities are available to the service users to choose from. Service users are encouraged to maintain contact with friends and family and the local community. Nutritional assessments are recorded in care plans with special dietary needs catered for. Service users are enabled to exercise choice in all aspects of their daily lives. Evidence: The home has an activities programme that is displayed in the lounge and reception area. This is produced on a weekly basis by the activities co-ordinator who is employed by the home for five days a week to arrange activities around the preferences and needs of the service users. The manager told us that currently there is only one co-ordinator employed but she is anticipating employing another two, once the home is fully occupied. A comment from a member of staff said: The home is newly opend and as the numbers grow we will be able to diversify and include a lot more activities. The programme on display demonstrated a variety of entertainment and activities. A music entertainer attends the home regularly, two dogs visit the home which is very welcomed by the service users. Group activities take place and this can be a quiz, Care Homes for Older People Page 17 of 32 Evidence: reminiscence and music sing-a-longs. Relatives are asked to write down a social profile of the service users past life. Each service user has a separate file with a profile and what activities they like and what activities they have participated in each day. This is also documented in the social care plans which were viewed by us. Service users religious beliefs and needs are documented in the care plans and are respected. The clergy visit the home monthly to offer communion and the manager said that she would access clergy from other denominations if it was requested. Some service users need one to one social interaction and this is provided for those people who are unable to interact within a group activity. A comment on a survey from a relative said The staff sit with him and talk to him even though he speech is not good they still interact with him. Service users spoken with said they enjoy the activities that take place. Two ladies were knitting and another told me that she likes to go down the road to the shops for the daily newspaper. Service users were observed to be enjoying one anothers company in the lounge area. The home welcomes visitors and the visitors book evidenced that the home has visitors most days. The AQAA says that the home has flexible visiting times with no restrictions. A comment from a visiting professional said The home is welcoming to relatives and visitors and the staff are always cheerful. The manager told us that families and friends are encouraged to join the service users at meal times, particularly for Sunday lunch. Support is given to service users who wish to maintain community contact. The manager told us that she is anticipating the home will have a mini-bus for outings and recognises that more trips out of the home will be needed in the future. The activities organiser takes one service user by taxi to visit her sister in another care home. Outings to the beach have also taken place when the weather was better. All service users have a nutritional risk assessment undertaken and this was evidenced in the care plans viewed. Weights were observed to be recorded monthly and more often if a risk is identified. The organisation has bought into a system named Nutmeg who produce menus for the elderly that have been researched to be nutritionally balanced and wholesome. The Care Homes for Older People Page 18 of 32 Evidence: menus were discussed with the chef, who is one of three chefs employed. He said that the menus are nutritious and varied and there is a choice at every meal time. The lunchtime meal was observed. The service users were offered home made soup, a choice of two main meals and two desserts. They told us that the food was very good and that they had enjoyed their meal. The chef told us he makes fresh cakes every day and these were seen to be served with the afternoon tea. Special diets are provided for and training for this has been given to the chefs. Service users are encouraged to make choices in their daily lives. Personal preferences for how the service users wish to carry out their activities of daily living, and this includes time of getting up in the morning, of going to bed routines, food likes and dislikes, are recorded in the assessment and care plans to allow for a person centred approach to their daily routines. Service users are encouraged to bring to the home their personal belongings to personalise their rooms. Care Homes for Older People Page 19 of 32 Complaints and protection These are the outcomes that people staying in care homes should experience. They reflect the things that people have said are important to them: If people have concerns with their care, they or people close to them know how to complain. Any concern is looked into and action taken to put things right. The care home safeguards people from abuse and neglect and takes action to follow up any allegations. People’s legal rights are protected, including being able to vote in elections. This is what people staying in this care home experience: Judgement: People using this service experience good quality outcomes in this area. We have made this judgement using a range of evidence, including a visit to this service. The home has a complaints policy and procedure in place which is made available to service users and families. Procedures are in place to protect service users from the risk of abuse Evidence: The home has a complaints policy and procedure and this is stated in the Statement of Purpose and the Service User Guide. The manager told us that the home has had no complaints to date. She said that complaints would be investigated by her and responded to within a 28 day timescale. The complaints system is used as a positive quality assurance tool and any complaints are audited monthly and fed into the improvement plan for the home. Surveys returned from relatives indicated that they would know who to talk to if they had concerns or issues about the home. One relative said on the survey The staff are pleasant to talk to and are very good if any problems come up. I can always talk to staff they are very helpful. The home follows the local safeguarding procedures and all staff have received training in all aspects of abuse. The policy and procedures to follow are understood by staff and are accessible to them from induction onwards. A whistle blowing policy is also in place and again staff are made aware of this during the induction programme. Care Homes for Older People Page 20 of 32 Evidence: The training matrix evidenced that most of the staff have received safeguarding training but for more recently employed staff they have yet to complete the induction programme. The manager told us that all service users have been assessed by social services for their mental capacity before they are admitted to the home. Care Homes for Older People Page 21 of 32 Environment These are the outcomes that people staying in care homes should experience. They reflect the things that people have said are important to them: People stay in a safe and well-maintained home that is homely, clean, pleasant and hygienic. People stay in a home that has enough space and facilities for them to lead the life they choose and to meet their needs. The home makes sure they have the right specialist equipment that encourages and promotes their independence. Their room feels like their own, it is comfortable and they feel safe when they use it. This is what people staying in this care home experience: Judgement: People using this service experience good quality outcomes in this area. We have made this judgement using a range of evidence, including a visit to this service. The homes environment is safe and well maintained. Infection control policy and procedures are in place and staff training and practices ensure that residents are protected from the risk of infection. Evidence: The home is purpose built and provides a clean, modern accommodation with all single room occupancy, each having an en-suite shower room facility. The home has been furnished and decorated tastefully. The home is registered for people who have dementia and the organisation has chosen not to decorate the environment in such a way that would enhance stimulation and allow service users to orientate themselves better to the different areas they occupy. The manager told us that signage is gradually going up to help service users know which are their rooms and which are toilets and bathrooms, as all the doors look the same. The home has a garden that is partially planted with immature shrubs, but the manager has plans for a sensory garden to be planted in the better weather. The garden is secure on all sides and is accessible to service users in the better weather with ramps in place to allow wheelchairs access. The home was clean and hygienic. The home employs a separate housekeeping staff and there is a housekeeper on duty every day of the week. The laundry is fit for Care Homes for Older People Page 22 of 32 Evidence: purpose and was observed to be well organised. A laundry person is on duty every day of the week and maintains personal and household laundry. The kitchen was visited and was observed to be clean and very well equipped. The home has been fully equipped with hoists, profile beds and any aids that have been identified as needed by a service user on assessment. The care files identify the service users need for equipment and how the equipment should be used. The home has policy and procedures in relation to infection control and all staff have been trained in the principles of infection control. There was evidence of hand washing facilities in all rooms and protective clothing available for staff to use. The environment has been fully risk assessed and a fire risk assessment was undertaken in October 2009, which was seen by us. Surveys returned to CQC said: The home is always clean, warm and feels friendly. Woodcot is very nice and a new build so hopefully it will remain that way. The cleaning staff keep it clean and the maintenance man not only maintains the home but spends time with the service users, which I know my husband enjoys so he can talk football. It is a nice environment to work in. Care Homes for Older People Page 23 of 32 Staffing These are the outcomes that people staying in care homes should experience. They reflect the things that people have said are important to them: People have safe and appropriate support as there are enough competent staff on duty at all times. They have confidence in the staff at the home because checks have been done to make sure that they are suitable to care for them. Their needs are met and they are cared for by staff who get the relevant training and support from their managers. There are no additional outcomes. This is what people staying in this care home experience: Judgement: People using this service experience good quality outcomes in this area. We have made this judgement using a range of evidence, including a visit to this service. The home employs an appropriate level and skill mix of staff that ensures the individual needs of the service users are met. The home has clear staff recruitment, training and development procedures in place that ensure that service users are protected and supported appropriately. Evidence: The home is in the process of admitting people on a phased programme. The manager told us that she has planned the admission programme and as she admits more service users she will then contact the staff that have been recruited to arrange dates for commencing employment and training. At the time of this visit their were 28 service users in residence. These were divided over two floors. On the top floor there were 15 service users with one registered nurse and three carers on duty throughout the day and one nurse and two carers at night. The ground floor where service users are more independent there was one senior and one carer on duty for thirteen service users. This remains the same throughout the 24 hour period. The registered manager and her deputy are also in the home five days a week and the deputy manager is counted in the work force except for one day when she is Care Homes for Older People Page 24 of 32 Evidence: supernumerary to allow her to undertake administration and training. At the time of this visit there appeared sufficient staff to meet the service users needs and carers were seen to be sitting with service users talking to them and giving them time. The training matrix was seen and evidenced that the staff have undertaken a variety of training since commencing employment and all mandatory training in relation to health and safety, dementia awareness, care plans, pressure area care and customer care. The deputy manager told us that the home has invested a great deal of time in training in the care planning system to ensure all levels of staff are familiar with it and use it as a working document. The AQAA told us that 10 of the 25 care workers have completed the national vocational qualification (NVQ) at level 2 and some have level 3. NVQ training will be offered to other carers as they are employed and have completed the induction programme. All staff complete an induction programme when they first commence employment at the home. The manager told us that the care staff induction is based on the Skills for Care programme. The registered nurses undertake a different induction which focuses on different aspects of their job roles. The manager was unable to show us evidence of a completed care staff induction programme, but there was evidence in a registered nurses staff file of a completed induction. A sample of three staff personnel files were seen. These evidenced that the recruitment procedures are robust and criminal record bureau (CRB) and the protection of vulnerable adults (POVA) checks had been undertaken and cleared before they commenced their employment. Two references were in the files, one being from the previous employer and application forms and interview notes were also maintained. The manager told us that she is continually recruiting for bank staff to ensure that service users are cared for by carers who are known to them, if permanent staff are sick or absent. Nine staff surveys were returned to CQC that told us staff had gone through the recruitment process and had received induction training that covered everything they needed to know about their jobs. They had received relevant training for their roles and consider they are fully supported by the management team. A comment on a Care Homes for Older People Page 25 of 32 Evidence: survey said Senior staff are always ready to assist with any queries.Good support and appreciation of the work done. I have never worked at a better run home and every staff member is polite and works well as a team.I enjoy working in the home. Staff are valued and empowered to provide best practice. There is a comprehensive induction programme and training, with the aim of providing quality care to all the services users and their families. Staff spoken to at the time of this visit told us that they receive regular supervision and training and enjoy caring for this client group, one saying I love working here. Care Homes for Older People Page 26 of 32 Management and administration These are the outcomes that people staying in care homes should experience. They reflect the things that people have said are important to them: People have confidence in the care home because it is led and managed appropriately. People control their own money and choose how they spend it. If they or someone close to them cannot manage their money, it is managed by the care home in their best interests. The environment is safe for people and staff because appropriate health and safety practices are carried out. People get the right support from the care home because the manager runs it appropriately with an open approach that makes them feel valued and respected. The people staying at the home are safeguarded because it follows clear financial and accounting procedures, keeps records appropriately and ensures their staff understand the way things should be done. They get the right care because the staff are supervised and supported by their managers. This is what people staying in this care home experience: Judgement: People using this service experience good quality outcomes in this area. We have made this judgement using a range of evidence, including a visit to this service. The mangement of the home provides effective leadership. There are systems and procedures in place to monitor the quality of the service provided and the health and safety of everyone living and working in the home. Evidence: The registered manager of this service has had considerable experience in the care industry and is a registered general nurse. She has had experience in managing a care home for those with dementia and is currently studying for a degree in dementia care. She told us that she keeps up to date with current legislation and continues to undertake training courses to keep abreast of changes in practice. She quoted in the AQAA that she has an open relationship with service users, relatives and staff and the structured management of the home leads to a positive atmosphere. There is a quality assurance system in place that is designed by the organisation to be used in all the homes they operate. The manager is required to return monthly key Care Homes for Older People Page 27 of 32 Evidence: outcome audits for each standard and this in turn identifies areas for improvement. The manager told us that the home managers audit each others homes. A sample of the audits was seen by us. The manager told us that surveys will be distributed to service users and other stakeholders but these have not been fully implemented to date owing to the home having only been operational for three months. The home does manage some service users personal monies. There is a system in place that enters all monies into one named bank account and each service user is named individually in the account. The monies in this account are used for service users only. The manager told us that this is not an interest generating account as the administration cost and bank charges do not allow this. We saw a record on the computer of each persons account which is audited monthly. All ingoing and out going monies, with receipts, were recorded with a balance identified. The manager has commenced a programme of supervision for staff. A sample of two supervision records were seen at the time of this visit. The manager told us that she will be planning a programme for yearly appraisals with senior members of staff, but each staff member does have a supervision session with their supervisors every two months. Woodcot Lodge is a purpose built nursing home. The home has been fitted with domestic type fixtures with handrails, smoke detectors and emergency lighting along corridors. External windows have been restricted and all external doors are alarmed. There is CCTV security surveillance on the outside of the building only. There is gas central heating, hot water and cooking within the home, although radiators in the bedrooms are electric. All radiators are of a safe low temperature surface type and are individually thermostatically controlled. The hot water controlled system meets water temperature control regulations for legionelle. Mixer valves have been fitted to hand sinks for the prevention of scalding and all shower units are independently regulated. The environment and systems have been checked by the appropriate authorities to ensure safe installation. Certificates were evidenced in the records. The hoists have been checked since the home was opened. The fire log was viewed and evidenced that the fire alarm system and equipment had been recorded as being checked at appropriate intervals. Care Homes for Older People Page 28 of 32 Evidence: The COSHH chemicals were observed to be secured in a locked environment when not in use. The home has a health and safety meeting every two months and safety audits are part of the quality assurance system and returned to the operational manager monthly. Care Homes for Older People Page 29 of 32 Are there any outstanding requirements from the last inspection? Yes £ No R Outstanding statutory requirements These are requirements that were set at the previous inspection, but have still not been met. They say what the registered person had to do to meet the Care Standards Act 2000, Care Homes Regulations 2001 and the National Minimum Standards. No. Standard Regulation Requirement Timescale for action Care Homes for Older People Page 30 of 32 Requirements and recommendations from this inspection: Immediate requirements: These are immediate requirements that were set on the day we visited this care home. The registered person had to meet these within 48 hours. No. Standard Regulation Requirement Timescale for action Statutory requirements These requirements set out what the registered person must do to meet the Care Standards Act 2000, Care Homes Regulations 2001 and the National Minimum Standards. The registered person(s) must do this within the timescales we have set. No. Standard Regulation Requirement Timescale for action Recommendations These recommendations are taken from the best practice described in the National Minimum Standards and the registered person(s) should consider them as a way of improving their service. No Refer to Standard Good Practice Recommendations 1 9 It is recommended that if medication is transcribed onto a MAR chart this should be signed by the transcriber and a second person to verify correct recording. Care Homes for Older People Page 31 of 32 Helpline: Telephone: 03000 616161 Email: enquiries@cqc.org.uk Web: www.cqc.org.uk We want people to be able to access this information. If you would like a summary in a different format or language please contact our helpline or go to our website. Copyright © (2009) Care Quality Commission (CQC). This publication may be reproduced in whole or in part, free of charge, in any format or medium provided that it is not used for commercial gain. This consent is subject to the material being reproduced accurately and on proviso that it is not used in a derogatory manner or misleading context. The material should be acknowledged as CQC copyright, with the title and date of publication of the document specified. Care Homes for Older People Page 32 of 32 - Please note that this information is included on www.bestcarehome.co.uk under license from the regulator. Re-publishing this information is in breach of the terms of use of that website. 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Woodcot Lodge 05/01/10

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