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Care Home: Woolton Manor

  • Allerton Road Woolton Liverpool Merseyside L25 7TB
  • Tel: 01514210801
  • Fax:
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Woolton Manor is a fine period residence set in its own grounds close to the picturesque village of Woolton, Liverpool. The home offers 66 single bedrooms, 65 of which benefiting from en-suite facilities. For those service users who choose to share, two rooms would be provided with the second room being a sitting room. There are two large lounges; two separate dining rooms, a quiet lounge and a garden/patio area. A separate smoking room is set-aside for clients. Fees at Woolton Manor range from #315 to #500 plus a top up fee of #20 per week. Outside the grounds, all the local village facilities, shops, post office and bus routes are available within easy walking distance.

  • Latitude: 53.369998931885
    Longitude: -2.8719999790192
  • Manager: Mrs Margaret Jenkins
  • Price p/w: ~
  • UK
  • Total Capacity: 66
  • Type: Care home with nursing
  • Provider: Mr Abid Yousaf Chudary
  • Ownership: Private
  • Care Home ID: 18367

Latest Inspection

This is the latest available inspection report for this service, carried out on 27th January 2009. CSCI found this care home to be providing an Good service.

The inspector found there to be outstanding requirements from the previous inspection report. These are things the inspector asked to be changed, but found they had not done. The inspector also made 4 statutory requirements (actions the home must comply with) as a result of this inspection.

For extracts, read the latest CQC inspection for Woolton Manor.

What the care home does well Most medicines are stored safely to prevent them from being misused. What the care home could do better: Medicines must be given as prescribed in order to protect people`s health and well being. The standard of record keeping must improve to reduce the risk of mistakes and to help ensure medicines are given properly. Care must be taken to store medicines at the correct temperature so that they do not spoil. Care must be taken to ensure that medicines are not used after their expiry date, which can be dangerous. Where people choose to self-administer medication written assessments and care plans need to be completed to help ensure people recieve any support they may need. Inspecting for better lives Random inspection report Care homes for older people Name: Address: Woolton Manor Allerton Road Woolton Liverpool Merseyside L25 7TB two star good service The quality rating for this care home is: The rating was made on: A quality rating is our assessment of how well a care home, agency or scheme is meeting the needs of the people who use it. We give a quality rating following a full assessment of the service. We call this a ‘key’ inspection. This is a report of a random inspection of this care home. A random inspection is a short, focussed inspection. Details of how to get other inspection reports for this care home, including the last key inspection report, can be found on the last page of this report. Lead inspector: Maggy Howells Date: 2 7 0 1 2 0 0 9 Information about the care home Name of care home: Address: Woolton Manor Allerton Road Woolton Liverpool Merseyside L25 7TB 01514210801 Telephone number: Fax number: Email address: Provider web address: wooltonmanor@btconnect.com Name of registered provider(s): Type of registration: Number of places registered: Conditions of registration: Category(ies) : Mr Abid Yousaf Chudary care home 66 Number of places (if applicable): Under 65 Over 65 66 old age, not falling within any other category Conditions of registration: 0 The registered person may provide the following category of service only: Care home with nursing: Code N, to people of the following gender: Either. Whose primary care needs on admission to the home are within the following categories: Old age, not falling within any other category: Code OP The maximum number of people who can be accommodated is: 66. Date of last inspection Brief description of the care home Woolton Manor is a fine period residence set in its own grounds close to the picturesque village of Woolton, Liverpool. The home offers 66 single bedrooms, 65 of which benefiting from en-suite facilities. For those service users who choose to share, two rooms would be provided with the second room being a sitting room. There are two large lounges; two separate dining rooms, a quiet lounge and a garden/patio area. A separate smoking room is set-aside for clients. Fees at Woolton Manor range from Care Homes for Older People Page 2 of 10 Brief description of the care home #315 to #500 plus a top up fee of #20 per week. Outside the grounds, all the local village facilities, shops, post office and bus routes are available within easy walking distance. Care Homes for Older People Page 3 of 10 What we found: We visited the home because there were concerns about how well the service was handling and recording medicines. The visit was carried out by a pharmacist inspector. It lasted eight hours and involved speaking with the manager, the proposed manager and two senior carers. We checked one medicines storage area, care plans, a sample of medicines stocks and medicines records. We gave detailed feedback to the manager and the proposed manager at the end of the visit. Overall, we found that the way that medicines were handled, administered and recorded was such that the health and wellbeing of people who use the service was placed at serious risk of harm. We looked at medicines records. The records were unclear and hard to follow as many entries were repeated. Most records were preprinted, but some had been handwritten. These had not been double signed. Mistakes are less likely when two people check the details of handwritten entries. It was of concern that the medication administration records were not completed correctly and accurately. We saw examples for two people who had recently been discharged from hospital where the entries on the medication administration record charts did not match those on the hospital discharge sheets. This meant that these people were unlikely to be given their medicines correctly due to missing or incorrect information. In one example a resident had not been given nutritional supplements and laxative tablets prescribed by the hospital. Another resident still had medicines on the trolley that had been stopped by their consultant. Inaccurate records place the health and well being of residents at serious risk of harm. We found some gaps and omissions in the medicines administration records, which made them unclear, and, in some cases, difficult to tell whether medicines had been given correctly. We saw three examples where administration records for eye drops and an inhaler (to prevent asthma attacks) were blank for over two weeks making it impossible to tell whether they had been given correctly. There was no evidence showing whether a tablet prescribed for another person had been given for a 3-day period. The tablet had been included on the persons medication administration record, but not signed for. We saw four examples where people who were prescribed weekly tablets to prevent osteoporosis (weakened bones) had not been given them. There were no records showing whether creams and ointments had been applied properly to one resident and we were told (and shown) that this person had creams other than those recorded on the administration record. It was not possible to account for the safe handling of most medication as there was no record of how much stock should have been present. Three medicines could not be accounted for at all. Failure to record accurately how much stock is received into the home, how much has been brought forward from a previous month, and how much is disposed of means that medicines cannot be accounted for. We looked at the administration of medicines. We were told that one of the morning medication rounds took a long time to complete and people did not always get their medicines at the time they were due. This meant that people were at risk, both of having to wait too long for medicines and being given their lunchtime medicines too Care Homes for Older People Page 4 of 10 soon. This is particularly important for people taking painkillers and medicines for diabetes and Parkinsons Disease who need their medicines regularly. Some people were prescribed medicines that were only to be taken when required. There was no detailed upto date information telling staff how to give these safely and consistently. The health and well being of people who use this service is at risk of harm when staff do not know how and when to give medication safely. People wishing to, were supported to manage their own medicines and this was recorded in their care plan, but written assessments of any risks were not detailed. There was no evidence that agreed checks (to ensure that people were actually taking their medcines safely) were carried out by staff. We looked at how medicines were stored and found that most medicines were safely stored helping to reduce the risk of mishandling. One medication room was untidy, unclean and appeared to be used as a staff cloakroom. This is unacceptable as it is unhygenic and increases the risk of cross-infection. It was of concern to find that the medication fridge contained three bottles of eye drops that were out of date. These drops should have been disposed of by 16th October 2008. We found that some nutritional supplements were not kept at the correct temperature, and it was not possible to see if they were still in-date. Medicines spoil when kept in the wrong conditions or for too long. Residents are at serious risk of harm if they are given spoilt medication or medicines that are past their expiry date. We looked at the handling, administration and recording of controlled drugs (medicines likely to be abused). These were stored in an appropriate cabinet and recorded in a special register. The time of administration had not always been recorded accurately. If the time is recorded incorrectly, people are at risk of being given their next dose too soon. We looked at how medicines were checked and audited. We saw a copy of a recent check, but this was not detailed and contained inaccuracies. As a result, no concerns over current practice had been raised. There was no record of any action taken as a result of this audit. Regular, effective audits help to ensure that medicines are safely handled and should any weaknesses arise, that they will be quickly addressed. Staff authorised to handle medicines had all received medication training, but had not undertaken any assessment of competence. It is important to test staffs competence in order to ensure that they understand and follow the homes procedures for safe handling of medication. What the care home does well: What they could do better: Medicines must be given as prescribed in order to protect peoples health and well being. The standard of record keeping must improve to reduce the risk of mistakes and to help ensure medicines are given properly. Care Homes for Older People Page 5 of 10 Care must be taken to store medicines at the correct temperature so that they do not spoil. Care must be taken to ensure that medicines are not used after their expiry date, which can be dangerous. Where people choose to self-administer medication written assessments and care plans need to be completed to help ensure people recieve any support they may need. If you want to know what action the person responsible for this care home is taking following this report, you can contact them using the details set out on page 2. Care Homes for Older People Page 6 of 10 Are there any outstanding requirements from the last inspection? Yes R No £ Outstanding statutory requirements These requirements were set at the last inspection. They may not have been looked at during this inspection, as a random inspection is short and focussed. The registered person must take the necessary action to comply with these requirements within the timescales set. No. Standard Regulation Requirement Timescale for action 1 9 13(2) Written confirmation must be 15/08/2008 obtained regarding medications to be administered via a PEG feed to ensure that the medications are suitable and that they are administered appropriately. Care Homes for Older People Page 7 of 10 Requirements and recommendations from this inspection Immediate requirements: These are immediate requirements that were set on the day we visited this care home. The registered person had to meet these within 48 hours. No. Standard Regulation Requirement Timescale for action Statutory requirements These requirements set out what the registered person must do to meet the Care Standards Act 2000, Care Homes Regulations 2001 and the National Minimum Standards. The registered person(s) must do this within the timescales we have set. No. Standard Regulation Requirement Timescale for action 1 9 13 Care must be taken to store medicines at the correct temperature and ensure that medicines are not used after their expiry date so that people are not given spoilt or out of date medication which can be dangerous. 27/02/2009 2 9 13 Records for the receipt, administration and disposal of medicines must be complete and accurate to reduce the risk of mistakes and to help ensure medicines are given properly. 27/02/2009 3 9 13 When people choose to look 27/02/2009 after and self-administer their own medication written assessments and care plans need to be completed in order to help ensure people recieve any support they may need. Medicines must be given as prescribed, with particular 27/02/2009 4 9 13 Care Homes for Older People Page 8 of 10 care taken to ensure they are given at the correct time if day in order to protect peoples health and well being. Recommendations These recommendations are taken from the best practice described in the National Minimum Standards and the registered person(s) should consider them as a way of improving their service. No. Refer to Standard Good Practice Recommendations 1 9 A second member of staff should check and double-sign medication record sheets to reduce the risk of mistakes. There should be clear written instructions informing staff how to give any medicines that are prescribed to be taken only when required so that people are given these medicines safely and consistently. The manager should ensure that all staff are competent to handle and record medicines safely before they perform these tasks Regular audits (checks) on all aspects of medicines management within the service should be carried out to identify areas of weakness. Actions taken as a result of the audits should be recorded. The medication storage areas should be clean and hygenic to prevent the risk of cross infection Care Homes for Older People Page 9 of 10 Reader Information Document Purpose: Author: Audience: Further copies from: Inspection Report CSCI General Public 0870 240 7535 (telephone order line) Our duty to regulate social care services is set out in the Care Standards Act 2000. Copies of the National Minimum Standards –Care Homes for Older People can be found at www.dh.gov.uk or got from The Stationery Office (TSO) PO Box 29, St Crispins, Duke Street, Norwich, NR3 1GN. Tel: 0870 600 5522. Online ordering from the Stationery Office is also available: www.tso.co.uk/bookshop Helpline: Telephone: 0845 015 0120 or 0191 233 3323 Textphone: 0845 015 2255 or 0191 233 3588 Email: enquiries@csci.gsi.gov.uk Web: www.csci.org.uk We want people to be able to access this information. If you would like a summary in a different format or language please contact our helpline or go to our website. Copyright © (2009) Commission for Social Care Inspection (CSCI). This publication may be reproduced in whole or in part, free of charge, in any format or medium provided that it is not used for commercial gain. This consent is subject to the material being reproduced accurately and on proviso that it is not used in a derogatory manner or misleading context. The material should be acknowledged as CSCI copyright, with the title and date of publication of the document specified. Care Homes for Older People Page 10 of 10 - Please note that this information is included on www.bestcarehome.co.uk under license from the regulator. Re-publishing this information is in breach of the terms of use of that website. Discrete codes and changes have been inserted throughout the textual data shown on the site that will provide incontrovertable proof of copying in the event this information is re-published on other websites. 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