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Care Home: 42 Twyford Gardens

  • 42 Twyford Gardens Worthing West Sussex BN13 2NT
  • Tel: 02085448900
  • Fax:
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42, Twyford Gardens is a care home registered to provide care and accommodation for up to 4 people with a learning difficulty. It is a detached bungalow and situated in a residential street on the outskirts of Worthing, West Sussex yet close to shops and other amenities. All of the residents have a single room on the ground floor, three of which are fitted with overhead hoists. Each room has en-suite facilities. Communal space consists of an open plan lounge/dining room and kitchen. There is a rear garden mostly laid to lawn with a ramp for wheelchair access to the care home 4Over 65 04 patio.

  • Latitude: 50.833000183105
    Longitude: -0.40799999237061
  • Manager: Manager post vacant
  • Price p/w: ~
  • UK
  • Total Capacity: 4
  • Type: Care home only
  • Provider: Care Management Group Ltd
  • Ownership: Private
  • Care Home ID: 748
Residents Needs:
Learning disability

Latest Inspection

This is the latest available inspection report for this service, carried out on 22nd April 2009. CQC found this care home to be providing an Good service.

The inspector found no outstanding requirements from the previous inspection report, but made 1 statutory requirements (actions the home must comply with) as a result of this inspection.

For extracts, read the latest CQC inspection for 42 Twyford Gardens.

What the care home does well 42 Twyford Gardens is a comfortable, well kept and homely environment for people to live in. Residents enjoy living there and are involved with the running of the home. All areas of the home are adapted to meet the needs of the residents. Staff are competent and well trained. They understand the varied needs of the residents and provide the support they need. Residents are able to make choices in their lives and take acceptable risks. Care plans are thorough, personalised and detailed. What has improved since the last inspection? Since the last inspection the manager of the home has registered with the Commission which was a requirement made at the last inspection. The home has purchased a mini bus to enable residents who use wheelchairs to access the community more easily. The back garden of the home has been made accessible to wheelchairs and a new patio and barbecue area has been built. The home is no longer using agency staff to fill shifts due to staff shortages. Staff at the home and from other homes in the Care Mangement Group are covering shifts. What the care home could do better: The home needs to continue to recruit permanent staff to ensure that there are enough staff to meet the needs of residents. At the time of the inspection there were three full time staff vacancies. Two of these had been potentially filled, but the home was waiting for the appropriate checks and references to be completed satisfactorily before they could put the new staff on the rota. Inspecting for better lives Key inspection report Care homes for adults (18-65 years) Name: Address: 42 Twyford Gardens 42 Twyford Gardens Worthing West Sussex BN13 2NT     The quality rating for this care home is:   two star good service A quality rating is our assessment of how well a care home, agency or scheme is meeting the needs of the people who use it. We give a quality rating following a full assessment of the service. We call this a ‘key’ inspection. Lead inspector: Jo Hartley     Date: 2 2 0 4 2 0 0 9 This is a report of an inspection where we looked at how well this care home is meeting the needs of people who use it. There is a summary of what we think this service does well, what they have improved on and, where it applies, what they need to do better. We use the national minimum standards to describe the outcomes that people should experience. National minimum standards are written by the Department of Health for each type of care service. After the summary there is more detail about our findings. The following table explains what you will see under each outcome area. Outcome area (for example Choice of home) These are the outcomes that people staying in care homes should experience. that people have said are important to them: They reflect the things This box tells you the outcomes that we will always inspect against when we do a key inspection. This box tells you any additional outcomes that we may inspect against when we do a key inspection. This is what people staying in this care home experience: Judgement: This box tells you our opinion of what we have looked at in this outcome area. We will say whether it is excellent, good, adequate or poor. Evidence: This box describes the information we used to come to our judgement. Copies of the National Minimum Standards – Care Homes for Adults (18-65 years) can be found at www.dh.gov.uk or bought from The Stationery Office (TSO) PO Box 29, St Crispins, Duke Street, Norwich, NR3 1GN. Tel: 0870 600 5522. Online ordering from the Stationery Office is also available: www.tso.co.uk/bookshop The Commission for Social Care Inspection aims to: • • • • Put the people who use social care first Improve services and stamp out bad practice Be an expert voice on social care Practise what we preach in our own organisation Our duty to regulate social care services is set out in the Care Standards Act 2000. Care Homes for Adults (18-65 years) Page 2 of 26 Reader Information Document Purpose Author Audience Further copies from Copyright Inspection report CSCI General public 0870 240 7535 (telephone order line) Copyright © (2009) Commission for Social Care Inspection (CSCI). This publication may be reproduced in whole or in part, free of charge, in any format or medium provided that it is not used for commercial gain. This consent is subject to the material being reproduced accurately and on proviso that it is not used in a derogatory manner or misleading context. The material should be acknowledged as CSCI copyright, with the title and date of publication of the document specified. www.cqc.org.uk Internet address Care Homes for Adults (18-65 years) Page 3 of 26 Information about the care home Name of care home: Address: 42 Twyford Gardens 42 Twyford Gardens Worthing West Sussex BN13 2NT 02085448900 Telephone number: Fax number: Email address: Provider web address: Name of registered provider(s): Care Management Group Ltd Name of registered manager (if applicable) Mr Angel Sandekov Type of registration: Number of places registered: Conditions of registration: Category(ies) : Number of places (if applicable): Under 65 learning disability Additional conditions: The maximum number of service users who can be accommodated is: 4 The registered person may provide the following category/ies of service only: Care home only - PC to service users of the following gender: Either whose primary care needs on admission to the home are within the following categories: Learning disability - LD Date of last inspection Brief description of the care home 42, Twyford Gardens is a care home registered to provide care and accommodation for up to 4 people with a learning difficulty. It is a detached bungalow and situated in a residential street on the outskirts of Worthing, West Sussex yet close to shops and other amenities. All of the residents have a single room on the ground floor, three of which are fitted with overhead hoists. Each room has en-suite facilities. Communal space consists of an open plan lounge/dining room and kitchen. There is a rear garden mostly laid to lawn with a ramp for wheelchair access to the Care Homes for Adults (18-65 years) Page 4 of 26 care home 4 Over 65 0 4 Brief description of the care home patio. Care Homes for Adults (18-65 years) Page 5 of 26 Summary This is an overview of what we found during the inspection. The quality rating for this care home is: Our judgement for each outcome: two star good service Choice of home Individual needs and choices Lifestyle Personal and healthcare support Concerns, complaints and protection Environment Staffing Conduct and management of the home peterchart Poor Adequate Good Excellent How we did our inspection: The quality rating for this service is 2 star. This means the people that use this service experience good quality outcomes. The purpose of the inspection was to assess how well the home is doing in meeting the key National Minimum Standards and Regulations. It was carried out by Jo Hartley. The findings of this report are based on several different sources of evidence. These include: previous reports of visits to the home, the Annual Quality Assurance Assessment (AQAA) completed by the home, an unannounced visit to the home, which was carried out on the 22nd April 2009 and discussions with residents and staff. We also sent surveys to residents, staff, health professionals and advocates. The information we received from the surveys is also included in this report. During the visit we looked at the homes policies and procedures, staff records and Care Homes for Adults (18-65 years) Page 6 of 26 residents records. All regulatory activity since the last inspection was reviewed and taken into account including notifications sent to the Commission for Social Care Inspection, (prior to 1st April 2009), and the Care Quality Commission, (from the 1st April 2009). The last inspection on this service was completed on the 1st May 2008. What the care home does well: What has improved since the last inspection? What they could do better: If you want to know what action the person responsible for this care home is taking following this report, you can contact them using the details set out on page 4. The report of this inspection is available from our website www.cqc.org.uk. You can get printed copies from enquiries@cqc.org.uk or by telephoning our order line –0870 240 7535. Care Homes for Adults (18-65 years) Page 8 of 26 Details of our findings Contents Choice of home (standards 1 - 5) Individual needs and choices (standards 6-10) Lifestyle (standards 11 - 17) Personal and healthcare support (standards 18 - 21) Concerns, complaints and protection (standards 22 - 23) Environment (standards 24 - 30) Staffing (standards 31 - 36) Conduct and management of the home (standards 37 - 43) Outstanding statutory requirements Requirements and recommendations from this inspection Care Homes for Adults (18-65 years) Page 9 of 26 Choice of home These are the outcomes that people staying in care homes should experience. They reflect the things that people have said are important to them: People are confident that the care home can support them. This is because there is an accurate assessment of their needs that they, or people close to them, have been involved in. This tells the home all about them, what they hope for and want to achieve, and the support they need. People can decide whether the care home can meet their support and accommodation needs. This is because they, and people close to them, can visit the home and get full, clear, accurate and up to date information. If they decide to stay in the home they know about their rights and responsibilities because there is an easy to understand contract or statement of terms and conditions between the person and the care home that includes how much they will pay and what the home provides for the money. This is what people staying in this care home experience: Judgement: People using this service experience good quality outcomes in this area. We have made this judgement using a range of evidence, including a visit to this service. Prospective residents needs and aspirations are assessed prior to moving into the home. Evidence: There are currently three people living at 42 Twyford Gardens. We looked at the preadmission assessments for the three residents and found them be thorough. The assessments include details of the persons background, physical and mental health, daily living and personal care needs, social and educational needs, communication, relationships, cultural/spiritual needs, and dietary needs and preferences. Equality and diversity issues are addressed throughout all of the assessments. Each resident also has an induction checklist when they move into the home which includes being introduced to staff and residents, being shown round the home, familiarisation with the fire procedures and the complaints procedure. There is also an induction questinnaire that each resident completes where they are able to give their preferences and likes and dislikes for areas of daily living. Care Homes for Adults (18-65 years) Page 10 of 26 Evidence: The home is currently preparing for a new resident to move in . A detailed preadmission assessment has been undertaken and a transition plan is in place. The transition plan includes staff from 42 Twyford Gardens visiting the prospective resident in their current home so the resident is able to get to know staff prior to moving in. Each resident has an individual statement of terms and conditions regarding living at the home. Care Homes for Adults (18-65 years) Page 11 of 26 Individual needs and choices These are the outcomes that people staying in care homes should experience. They reflect the things that people have said are important to them: People’s needs and goals are met. The home has a plan of care that the person, or someone close to them, has been involved in making. People are able to make decisions about their life, including their finances, with support if they need it. This is because the staff promote their rights and choices. People are supported to take risks to enable them to stay independent. This is because the staff have appropriate information on which to base decisions. People are asked about, and are involved in, all aspects of life in the home. This is because the manager and staff offer them opportunities to participate in the day to day running of the home and enable them to influence key decisions. People are confident that the home handles information about them appropriately. This is because the home has clear policies and procedures that staff follow. This is what people staying in this care home experience: Judgement: People using this service experience excellent quality outcomes in this area. We have made this judgement using a range of evidence, including a visit to this service. Residents have individual service user plans. Potential risks have been identified and minimised as far as possible. Residents are involved in all aspects of life in the home. Evidence: The care plans that we saw during the visit were detailed and person centred. Individuals needs and how they will be met by the home are clearly documented. This includes personal care, diet, equipment required, relationships, education, leisure, cultural and spiritual needs, health needs, medication, psychiatric and psychological support and finance. Care plans include photos to assist residents to understand the content. We saw evidence that residents and their families are involved in care planning and reviews. All residents have detailed daily records that are collated into monthly reports/reviews. Care Homes for Adults (18-65 years) Page 12 of 26 Evidence: The information detailed in daily records cover personal care issues, medical appointments, visitors, activities, money, general mood and any other issues that have arisen during the day. Each resident has risk assessments for individual risks and Health and Safety risks in the home and out in the community. E.g. hoists, choking, dehydration, feeding, accessing kitchen facilities, fire safety, mobility, attending college, communication and road safety. Risk assessments describe the risk, how to minimise it and the outcomes and consequences of actions. Any restrictions to liberty due to minimising risks are clearly defined with reasons. Residents are involved in the running of the home. They told us have regular meetings with the staff and the Manager and they get to say what they would like on the menu or what activities they would like. They are also involved in food preparation and tidying up around the home. One of the residents told us they have a choice of when to go to bed. They can stay up as long as they want. This was confirmed by talking to staff and looking at the daily records and care plans. Staff were able to tell us how residents are supported to make choices in their lives. For example, residents help plan menus through verbal communication and the use of photographs of different meals that are displayed in the kitchen. Residents also have individual communication passports to enable them to communicate more effectively. Care Homes for Adults (18-65 years) Page 13 of 26 Lifestyle These are the outcomes that people staying in care homes should experience. They reflect the things that people have said are important to them: Each person is treated as an individual and the care home is responsive to his or her race, culture, religion, age, disability, gender and sexual orientation. They can take part in activities that are appropriate to their age and culture and are part of their local community. The care home supports people to follow personal interests and activities. People are able to keep in touch with family, friends and representatives and the home supports them to have appropriate personal, family and sexual relationships. People are as independent as they can be, lead their chosen lifestyle and have the opportunity to make the most of their abilities. Their dignity and rights are respected in their daily life. People have healthy, well-presented meals and snacks, at a time and place to suit them. People have opportunities to develop their social, emotional, communication and independent living skills. This is because the staff support their personal development. People choose and participate in suitable leisure activities. This is what people staying in this care home experience: Judgement: People using this service experience good quality outcomes in this area. We have made this judgement using a range of evidence, including a visit to this service. Residents are supported to be involved in appropriate activities. Relationships are maintained with family and friends. The home promotes healthy eating and provides a varied diet for service users. Evidence: Each resident has an individual activity plan that sets out what activities they like to take part in. Looking at daily records and activity records we could see that activities residents have recently participated in include gardening, bowling, shopping going out for lunch, discos, visiting the local library, exercise programmes, videos, cooking, aromatherapy, outreach at one of the other homes owned by th company, college, pampering and going out for walks. One resident has a mini greenhouse in the garden so he can propagate seeds for the homes garden. Care Homes for Adults (18-65 years) Page 14 of 26 Evidence: Each resident has a detailed activity record that records each activity taken part in and includes comments on enjoyment and level of participation. At the last inspection it was recommended that the home provide its own transport so that people who are wheelchair users can more easily access community and educational facilities. During the visit we saw that the home now has a mini bus which is being used for the residents benefit. We could see from the daily records that residents are able to maintain relationships with their families and friends outside of the home. A relative told us that the home arranges visits and helps my daughter to call me on the phone on a regular basis. Two residents told us that they are able to help choose the menu for the week and assist staff with shopping for food. There is a board in the kitchen with pictures and photos of various meals, this is used as an aid to assisting residents who have little verbal communication to choose meals they would like. During the visit one resident was seen cooking the evening meal with staff. We saw the menu for the current week. It was varied and included fresh fruit and vegetables. Care Homes for Adults (18-65 years) Page 15 of 26 Personal and healthcare support These are the outcomes that people staying in care homes should experience. They reflect the things that people have said are important to them: People receive personal support from staff in the way they prefer and want. Their physical and emotional health needs are met because the home has procedures in place that staff follow. If people take medicine, they manage it themselves if they can. If they cannot manage their medicine, the care home supports them with it in a safe way. If people are approaching the end of their life, the care home will respect their choices and help them to feel comfortable and secure. They, and people close to them, are reassured that their death will be handled with sensitivity, dignity and respect, and take account of their spiritual and cultural wishes. This is what people staying in this care home experience: Judgement: People using this service experience good quality outcomes in this area. We have made this judgement using a range of evidence, including a visit to this service. Residents receive personal support in an appropriate manner. Residents physical and emotional needs are met as far as possible. Suitable procedures are in place in respect of the administration of medication. Evidence: Staff were witnessed providing appropriate support to residents throughout the inspection. Each resident has detailed information in their care plans on how they prefer their personal care to be carried out. Every resident has their own keyworker to ensure consistency and continuity of support. Each resident has an individual Healthcare Action Plan. Evidence in residents health files show that they receive additional healthcare support, e.g. from psychiatrists, opticians, dentists and general practitioners when it is required. A record is kept of all health appointments, the outcomes of the appointments and any action that needs to be taken. The company that owns 42 Twyford Gardens has an inhouse physiotherapist Care Homes for Adults (18-65 years) Page 16 of 26 Evidence: and Healthcare Facilitator to ensure that residents have thorough health plans and are referred to independent medical professionals when required. Records of the receipt and administration of medication were seen. All records seen were complete and accurately recorded. Prescribed medicines are delivered monthly and are blister packed. We saw training records that show that all support staff undertake training in the administration of medication. Care Homes for Adults (18-65 years) Page 17 of 26 Concerns, complaints and protection These are the outcomes that people staying in care homes should experience. They reflect the things that people have said are important to them: If people have concerns with their care, they or people close to them, know how to complain. Their concern is looked into and action taken to put things right. The care home safeguards people from abuse, neglect and self-harm and takes action to follow up any allegations. There are no additional outcomes. This is what people staying in this care home experience: Judgement: People using this service experience good quality outcomes in this area. We have made this judgement using a range of evidence, including a visit to this service. The home has procedures in place for Safeguarding Vulnerable Adults and complaints. These procedures are followed when needed. Evidence: The home has a complaints policy and procedure, which is available in pictorial format. Residents told us that they know how to make a complaint if they need to. The Annual Quality Assurance Assessment that the home completed prior to the inspection stated that they have received six complaints and made three safeguarding referrals in the last twelve months. The Commission was notified of the safeguarding referrals when they were made. We saw evidence during the visit that the complaints have been dealt with according to the homes complaints procedure. The homes procedures on Abuse, Adult Protection and Whistle Blowing were seen. They were detailed and included descriptions on different types of abuse. Staff files contained certificates that show that all staff have attended Adult Protection training. Care Homes for Adults (18-65 years) Page 18 of 26 Environment These are the outcomes that people staying in care homes should experience. They reflect the things that people have said are important to them: People stay in a safe and well-maintained home that is homely, clean, comfortable, pleasant and hygienic. People stay in a home that has enough space and facilities for them to lead the life they choose and to meet their needs. The home makes sure they have the right specialist equipment that encourages and promotes their independence. Their room feels like their own, it is comfortable and they feel safe when they use it. People have enough privacy when using toilets and bathrooms. This is what people staying in this care home experience: Judgement: People using this service experience good quality outcomes in this area. We have made this judgement using a range of evidence, including a visit to this service. The residents live in a good standard of accommodation that is well maintained. Evidence: 42 Twyford Gardens is wheelchair accessible throughout. The house is well presented with good quality furniture and fittings. On the day of the visit it was clean and tidy. Residents told us that it is always kept clean. The kitchen has a low level worktop to enable residents who use wheelchairs to make drinks and assist with meal preparation. Residents rooms are large and airy with en suite facilities. Each room has been personally individualised with family photos and personal belongings. Throughout the home there are pictures on the wall that residents have painted themselves. There are also photographs of recent activities and social gatherings. The garden has recently had a path built to enable people who use wheelchairs to access the patio area at the bottom of the garden. The garden is well laid out with borders, lawn, barbecue and garden furniture. Care Homes for Adults (18-65 years) Page 19 of 26 Staffing These are the outcomes that people staying in care homes should experience. They reflect the things that people have said are important to them: People have safe and appropriate support as there are enough competent, qualified staff on duty at all times. They have confidence in the staff at the home because checks have been done to make sure that they are suitable. People’s needs are met and they are supported because staff get the right training, supervision and support they need from their managers. People are supported by an effective staff team who understand and do what is expected of them. This is what people staying in this care home experience: Judgement: People using this service experience adequate quality outcomes in this area. We have made this judgement using a range of evidence, including a visit to this service. Residents receive support from well trained and supported staff, however, the home needs to ensure that there are enough staff available to enable it to meet the needs of the residents. Evidence: At the last inspection it was found that the home had experienced staffing issues and as a result a requirement was made that the home must ensure that a stable staff team of suitably qualified and experienced persons are employed to meet the current needs of service users. This was discussed with the manager at this visit. We were told that the home has three full time vacancies. The shifts are being covered by the support workers from the home and other homes in the Care Management Group rather than using agency staff. This was confirmed by a member of staff spoken with during the visit. We were told that they have offered jobs to two people so far but are awaiting CRB, POVA and references before the new staff can start. In the surveys that staff returned to us we received a mixed response to the staffing levels in the home. One person said there were always enough staff, one said there Care Homes for Adults (18-65 years) Page 20 of 26 Evidence: usually is, one said there sometimes is and two said there never is. One comment said, At the moment we are short staffed. I dont know what to do. The home employs a multicultural staff team and for several English is their second language. English language courses have been provided for some of the staff to improve their skills in both verbal and written skills. The daily records that were seen during the visit were written in clear English. Three staff members hold a National Vocational Qualification (NVQ) in Care and two have equivalent qualifications. One member of staff is completing their NVQ4 and another is doing the NVQ3. We looked at the files of the most recently recruited staff. They contained all the required information and documents including Criminal Records Bureau and Protection Of Vulnerable Adults checks, two written references and application forms. We were told that residents are involved with staff recruitment through informal meetings with prospective staff and involvement in the interview panel. We saw records that showed that staff receive regular supervision sessions and staff meetings are held monthly. All the staff who responded to our survey told us that their induction covered everything they needed to know about their job when they started. During the visit we witnessed the staff chatting and working with the residents in a friendly manner. The staff that we spoke with during the visit were very clear about the needs, likes, dislikes and preferred routines of the residents. The home has a staff training programme in place that includes some training being completed through an E Learning programme. Staff that need it are given IT support to enable them to access these courses. The training programme includes courses in Food Safety, Infection Control, Introduction to Learning Disability, Safeguarding, Dealing with Emergencies, Working Safely. Manual Handling, Fire Protection, Health and Safety, First Aid, Challenging Behaviour, Epilepsy, Mental Health, Diabetes, Communication and Autism. Staff told us that they receive training that is relevant, helps them understand and meet the needs of residents and keeps them up to date with new ways of working. Evidence seen that Equality and Diversity training is booked for staff in June. Care Homes for Adults (18-65 years) Page 21 of 26 Conduct and management of the home These are the outcomes that people staying in care homes should experience. They reflect the things that people have said are important to them: People have confidence in the care home because it is run and managed appropriately. People’s opinions are central to how the home develops and reviews their practice, as the home has appropriate ways of making sure they continue to get things right. The environment is safe for people and staff because health and safety practices are carried out. People get the right support from the care home because the manager runs it appropriately, with an open approach that makes them feel valued and respected. They are safeguarded because the home follows clear financial and accounting procedures, keeps records appropriately and makes sure staff understand the way things should be done. This is what people staying in this care home experience: Judgement: People using this service experience good quality outcomes in this area. We have made this judgement using a range of evidence, including a visit to this service. The home is managed by a competent and experienced manager. The health and welfare of the residents and staff are protected. Evidence: At previous inspections requirements have been made that the home needs to have a registered manager in post. Mr Sandekov has been the manager for two years and has now registered with the Commission. He has a Registered Managers Award and an NVQ Level Three in Care. The home has produced a quality assurance system, which includes Care Management Group internal audits and regular Regulation 26 visits. Copies of these reports were read on the day. Feedback from residents is sought and the home has a pictorial format questionnaire for residents who find reading difficult. Annual feedback surveys for relatives are also sent out. Safety certificates for equipment in the home were seen and found to be up to date. Care Homes for Adults (18-65 years) Page 22 of 26 Evidence: The Health and Safety Policies and Procedures were seen to be thorough. Health and safety records were viewed. Fire drills are held three monthly and fire alarms are checked weekly. Staff have attended fire safety training. Most of the staff hold a first aid certificate and the home records all accidents that occur. There is a policy for the prevention and management of infection and staff have received training in this subject. Care Homes for Adults (18-65 years) Page 23 of 26 Are there any outstanding requirements from the last inspection? Yes £ No R Outstanding statutory requirements These are requirements that were set at the previous inspection, but have still not been met. They say what the registered person had to do to meet the Care Standards Act 2000, Care Homes Regulations 2001 and the National Minimum Standards. No. Standard Regulation Requirement Timescale for action Care Homes for Adults (18-65 years) Page 24 of 26 Requirements and recommendations from this inspection: Immediate requirements: These are immediate requirements that were set on the day we visited this care home. The registered person had to meet these within 48 hours. No. Standard Regulation Requirement Timescale for action Statutory requirements These requirements set out what the registered person must do to meet the Care Standards Act 2000, Care Homes Regulations 2001 and the National Minimum Standards. The registered person(s) must do this within the timescales we have set. No. Standard Regulation Requirement Timescale for action 1 33 18 The registered person shall 19/07/2009 ensure that at all times suitable qualified, competent and experienced persons are working at the care home in such numbers as are appropriate for the health and welfare of service users. There needs to be enough staff to meet the needs of service users. Recommendations These recommendations are taken from the best practice described in the National Minimum Standards and the registered person(s) should consider them as a way of improving their service. No. Refer to Standard Good Practice Recommendations Care Homes for Adults (18-65 years) Page 25 of 26 Helpline: Telephone: 03000 616161 or Textphone: or Email: enquiries@cqc.org.uk Web: www.cqc.org.uk We want people to be able to access this information. If you would like a summary in a different format or language please contact our helpline or go to our website. Copyright © (2009) Commission for Social Care Inspection (CSCI). This publication may be reproduced in whole or in part, free of charge, in any format or medium provided that it is not used for commercial gain. This consent is subject to the material being reproduced accurately and on proviso that it is not used in a derogatory manner or misleading context. The material should be acknowledged as CSCI copyright, with the title and date of publication of the document specified. Care Homes for Adults (18-65 years) Page 26 of 26 - Please note that this information is included on www.bestcarehome.co.uk under license from the regulator. Re-publishing this information is in breach of the terms of use of that website. Discrete codes and changes have been inserted throughout the textual data shown on the site that will provide incontrovertable proof of copying in the event this information is re-published on other websites. The policy of www.bestcarehome.co.uk is to use all legal avenues to pursue such offenders, including recovery of costs. 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