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Care Home: Cloyda

  • 227 Malden Road New Malden Surrey KT3 6AG
  • Tel: 02089491839
  • Fax: 02089491839

Cloyda is a residential care home registered with the Commission for Social Care Inspection to provide care for up to thirty five people over the age of sixty five, ten of which may have a diagnosis of dementia. The home is a large detached property, located on a main road close to the centre of New Malden. There is easy access to the A3 and to public transport. Accommodation is provided in single rooms on the ground and first floor, which can be accessed by passenger lift. There is a large garden to the rear of the property. Copies of the home`s Statement of Purpose and Service User Guide can be obtained from the Registered Providers on request, as can a copy of the Commission for Social Care Inspection`s most recent inspection report. The latter can also be obtained from The Commission for Social Care Inspection via the internet at www.csci.org.uk Fees at the time of writing range between £550and £560 and would be discussed prior to admission. Some extra charges may be payable for services such as hairdressing.

  • Latitude: 51.391998291016
    Longitude: -0.25400000810623
  • Manager: Louise Ellen Sutton
  • Price p/w: £555
  • UK
  • Total Capacity: 35
  • Type: Care home only
  • Provider: Mrs Dahiben Vallabhbhai Patel,Mr Vallabhbhai Morarbhai Patel
  • Ownership: Private
  • Care Home ID: 4769
Residents Needs:
Dementia, Old age, not falling within any other category

Previous Inspections

This may not be the latest inspection for this service as we are having techinical problems updating from CQC - please check directly on the regulators website for the most recent report; bestcarehome hopes to be back to regular updates shortly.

For extracts, read the latest CQC inspection for Cloyda.

CARE HOMES FOR OLDER PEOPLE Cloyda 227 Malden Road New Malden Surrey KT3 6AG Lead Inspector Alison Ford Unannounced Inspection 13th November 2008 11:45 X10015.doc Version 1.40 Page 1 The Commission for Social Care Inspection aims to: • • • • Put the people who use social care first Improve services and stamp out bad practice Be an expert voice on social care Practise what we preach in our own organisation Reader Information Document Purpose Author Audience Further copies from Copyright Inspection Report CSCI General Public 0870 240 7535 (telephone order line) This report is copyright Commission for Social Care Inspection (CSCI) and may only be used in its entirety. Extracts may not be used or reproduced without the express permission of CSCI www.csci.org.uk Internet address Cloyda DS0000013381.V373099.R01.S.doc Version 5.2 Page 2 This is a report of an inspection to assess whether services are meeting the needs of people who use them. The legal basis for conducting inspections is the Care Standards Act 2000 and the relevant National Minimum Standards for this establishment are those for Care Homes for Older People. They can be found at www.dh.gov.uk or obtained from The Stationery Office (TSO) PO Box 29, St Crispins, Duke Street, Norwich, NR3 1GN. Tel: 0870 600 5522. Online ordering: www.tso.co.uk/bookshop This report is a public document. Extracts may not be used or reproduced without the prior permission of the Commission for Social Care Inspection. Cloyda DS0000013381.V373099.R01.S.doc Version 5.2 Page 3 SERVICE INFORMATION Name of service Cloyda Address 227 Malden Road New Malden Surrey KT3 6AG Telephone number Fax number Email address Provider Web address Name of registered provider(s)/company (if applicable) Name of registered manager (if applicable) Type of registration No. of places registered (if applicable) 020 8949 1839 020 8949 1839 cloyda@hotmail.com Mr Vallabhbhai Morarbhai Patel Mrs Dahiben Vallabhbhai Patel Louise Ellen Sutton Care Home 35 Category(ies) of Dementia (35), Old age, not falling within any registration, with number other category (35) of places Cloyda DS0000013381.V373099.R01.S.doc Version 5.2 Page 4 SERVICE INFORMATION Conditions of registration: 1. The registered person may provide the following category of service only: Care Home Only - Code PC to service users of the following gender: Either whose primary care needs on admission to the home are within the following categories: Old age, not falling within any other category - Code OP 2. Dementia - Code DE The maximum number of service users who can be accommodated is: 35 27th November 2007 Date of last inspection Brief Description of the Service: Cloyda is a residential care home registered with the Commission for Social Care Inspection to provide care for up to thirty five people over the age of sixty five, ten of which may have a diagnosis of dementia. The home is a large detached property, located on a main road close to the centre of New Malden. There is easy access to the A3 and to public transport. Accommodation is provided in single rooms on the ground and first floor, which can be accessed by passenger lift. There is a large garden to the rear of the property. Copies of the home’s Statement of Purpose and Service User Guide can be obtained from the Registered Providers on request, as can a copy of the Commission for Social Care Inspection’s most recent inspection report. The latter can also be obtained from The Commission for Social Care Inspection via the internet at www.csci.org.uk Fees at the time of writing range between £550and £560 and would be discussed prior to admission. Some extra charges may be payable for services such as hairdressing. Cloyda DS0000013381.V373099.R01.S.doc Version 5.2 Page 5 SUMMARY This is an overview of what the inspector found during the inspection. The quality rating for this service is 2 stars, this means the people who use this service experience good quality outcomes. This key inspection visit was unannounced and contributes to the inspection process of the home for the year 2008/2009. In compiling this report consideration has also been given to information received about the home throughout the year such as complaints, and the notification of any incidents. In addition, the Registered Providers sent us their Annual Quality Assurance Assessment. This is a document that they have to return to let us know about their service and how well they consider that they are meeting the needs of those people that they are caring for. It also told us about their plans for the future and it shows that the home knows what it could do to make life better for people. During the visit all we assessed all of those standards considered, by The Commission for Social Care Inspection, to be key to the inspection process. We undertook a tour of the premises and spoke with many of the residents about what it was like for them living in the home and also to members of staff. We looked at a sample of care plans and various records and documentation that the home has to keep as evidence of their commitment to the health and safety of their residents. Having reviewed all of the information that was available and undertaken our visit we considered that the home currently provides good quality outcomes for the people who are living there. In some areas, which affect the daily lives of residents, outcomes exceed the standard however; we are concerned about the slow progress of improvements to the home and the lack of funding for training. Also the Registered Manager seems to have been given limited control over some issues and if this is not addressed it may well have an adverse effect on the overall rating in the future. What the service does well: Cloyda provides a home for up to thirty-five residents some of whom have dementia. As an older home some of the rooms would not comply with current standards however, the premises are suitable for their purpose and ramps and a lift make all areas accessible to residents including those who rely on wheelchairs. Cloyda DS0000013381.V373099.R01.S.doc Version 5.2 Page 6 Many of the people who use this service, are not able to contribute to the inspection process however, those who are, say that staff are kind and helpful and that the home is a nice place to live in. They all appeared happy and content, and seemed to be having their personal care needs met in a way, which suits them. Staff members, were very caring and kind and they were available for residents. Some were seen spending time talking with them reading and doing jigsaw puzzles. Since the appointment of the Registered Manager there has been a marked increase in the range of activities organised for residents, some of which are considered to be quite innovative. There are weekly cheese and wine parties, the ice cream man visits regularly and the local Brownies entertain at the weekends. People are helped to be as independent as they are able and several of them are able to go out of the home using the taxi card scheme. Community involvement is encouraged with regular visits from the local Brownies and representatives from the local church. Mealtimes continue to be a pleasurable experience and residents are able to enjoy a glass of wine with their meal if the would like it. Choices are always available if they do not like the menu that day and fresh fruit and drinks are left out on the on the table for them to help themselves Residents that we spoke with during our visit told us “ its nice here” “ everyone is lovely “ I have a nice room “ and “there is nice food to eat here.” Some visitors that we spoke with said, “ everyone is always so polite here, they have always got time to chat”. Assessments of potential residents healthcare needs are undertaken prior to admission to ensure that they can be met in the home and individual care plans are in place to identify the help and support that they need and how care staff will help them. They are reviewed on a regular basis to ensure that any changes are identified. There is low staff turnover, providing continuity of care for those who live there and robust recruitment procedures are in place to ensure that they are protected from those who have been judged as being unsuitable to work with vulnerable people. A strong and cohesive staff team seems to be being built in the home. What has improved since the last inspection? All of the requirements from the last inspection have been addressed. The manager has now been registered with The Commission and her enthusiasm and commitment to improving the lives of residents has resulted in the overall rating for the home being increased. Cloyda DS0000013381.V373099.R01.S.doc Version 5.2 Page 7 Redecoration and refurbishment of the home has continued and residents have been able to help choose the carpets and furnishings. A new plasma screen television has also been purchased with money that was donated to the home. The range of activities that residents are able to participate in has increased and entertainers visit on a regular basis. Care plans continue to improve and provide us with evidence that people are being supported in a way, which suits them and meets their needs. Medication procedures have been improved and the home has purchased a medication trolley to make administration safer and easier. All of the requirements issued by the fire safety officer have been addressed to make sure that residents will be protected in the event of a fire. What they could do better: Please contact the provider for advice of actions taken in response to this inspection. The report of this inspection is available from enquiries@csci.gsi.gov.uk or by contacting your local CSCI office. The summary of this inspection report can be made available in other formats on request. Cloyda DS0000013381.V373099.R01.S.doc Version 5.2 Page 8 DETAILS OF INSPECTOR FINDINGS CONTENTS Choice of Home (Standards 1–6) Health and Personal Care (Standards 7-11) Daily Life and Social Activities (Standards 12-15) Complaints and Protection (Standards 16-18) Environment (Standards 19-26) Staffing (Standards 27-30) Management and Administration (Standards 31-38) Scoring of Outcomes Statutory Requirements Identified During the Inspection Cloyda DS0000013381.V373099.R01.S.doc Version 5.2 Page 9 Choice of Home The intended outcomes for Standards 1 – 6 are: 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. Prospective service users have the information they need to make an informed choice about where to live. Each service user has a written contract/ statement of terms and conditions with the home. No service user moves into the home without having had his/her needs assessed and been assured that these will be met. Service users and their representatives know that the home they enter will meet their needs. Prospective service users and their relatives and friends have an opportunity to visit and assess the quality, facilities and suitability of the home. Service users assessed and referred solely for intermediate care are helped to maximise their independence and return home. The Commission considers Standards 3 and 6 the key standards to be inspected. JUDGEMENT – we looked at outcomes for the following standard(s): Standards 3,6 People using the service experience good quality outcomes in this area. This judgement has been made using available evidence including a visit to this service. No one is admitted in to the home without having a full needs assessment carried out by a senior member of staff to make sure that the home will be suitable for their needs. This home does not offer intermediate care so this standard does not apply. EVIDENCE: Most people who use this service are admitted through a Care Management arrangement and funded by the local authority. They would have an assessment undertaken by their care manager to outline the support that they would need. These were seen in the care plans that we looked at during the inspection. In addition a senior member of staff from the home would visit the person to undertake their own asessment and make sure that they could offer the support that would be required. Cloyda DS0000013381.V373099.R01.S.doc Version 5.2 Page 10 All the residents are given a copy of the Service User Guide so that they and their relatives are aware of the sevices and support that will be provided. These have been updated recently. Cloyda DS0000013381.V373099.R01.S.doc Version 5.2 Page 11 Health and Personal Care The intended outcomes for Standards 7 – 11 are: 7. 8. 9. 10. 11. The service user’s health, personal and social care needs are set out in an individual plan of care. Service users’ health care needs are fully met. Service users, where appropriate, are responsible for their own medication, and are protected by the home’s policies and procedures for dealing with medicines. Service users feel they are treated with respect and their right to privacy is upheld. Service users are assured that at the time of their death, staff will treat them and their family with care, sensitivity and respect. The Commission considers Standards 7, 8, 9 and 10 the key standards to be inspected. JUDGEMENT – we looked at outcomes for the following standard(s): Standards 7,8,9,10 People using the service experience good quality outcomes in this area. This judgement has been made using available evidence including a visit to this service. The people who use this service have their healthcare needs met in a way which suits them and individual care plans are in place which reflect the care, and support that they currently need Medication policies and procedures are in place to ensure that residents are protected and they can be confident that they will be treated with respect and in a way that respects their privacy and dignity. EVIDENCE: The care plans of four residents currently living in the home were seen. They contained good information about their needs, the support that they require and the outcomes that were hoping to be achieved. Care plans have improved considerably over the last year however; The Registered Manager has identified further ways in which they could be changed in order to make them easier for staff to complete. Moving and handing assessments are in place for every resident as is documentation, which identifies those at risk from developing pressure sores. Residents complete dietary preference surveys on admission, so that staff Cloyda DS0000013381.V373099.R01.S.doc Version 5.2 Page 12 know what they like to eat, and for those at risk there are nutritional care plans in place. There are no trained nurses working in this home and entries in the care plans show that other healthcare professionals visit as required. This includes community nurses who undertake any nursing tasks that are required. There was still limited evidence to show that residents or their representatives had contributed to the care planning process. However, it is acknowledged that the majority of residents are very frail and confused and do not have the ability to participate. Also, many of them do not have relatives that are interested in becoming involved. Medication records were in order and all medication was locked away. Since the last inspection a medicine trolley has been purchased which can be wheeled around the home to make administration easier and the medication is supplied in blister packs. At the time of admission residents would be assessed as to their ability to look after their own medication however, no one is currently able to do this. The staff who support them with their medication are specifically trained to do this and community nurses would visit to give any injections that are required. There is a list of medication that can be given without a prescription, in line with a homely remedies procedure. Staff were observed treating residents very gently and with kindness and respect. Residents commented that “they are nice girls, they always come and help us” and “they are always lovely and kind”. Some visitors on the day of the inspection particularly commented on how polite every one who worked in the home was and said that they were always told what was going on. One resident, who had not been living in the home for very long, was able to tell us how worried that she had been before she moved in. She told us how lovely everyone had been to her and how happy she was that she had come there. It was noted that the home still does not employ any male carers. In order to offer residents a choice it was previously recommended that consideration should be given to addressing this shortfall. The opportunity to do this has not arisen as yet. Cloyda DS0000013381.V373099.R01.S.doc Version 5.2 Page 13 Cloyda DS0000013381.V373099.R01.S.doc Version 5.2 Page 14 Daily Life and Social Activities The intended outcomes for Standards 12 - 15 are: 12. 13. 14. 15. Service users find the lifestyle experienced in the home matches their expectations and preferences, and satisfies their social, cultural, religious and recreational interests and needs. Service users maintain contact with family/ friends/ representatives and the local community as they wish. Service users are helped to exercise choice and control over their lives. Service users receive a wholesome appealing balanced diet in pleasing surroundings at times convenient to them. The Commission considers all of the above key standards to be inspected. JUDGEMENT – we looked at outcomes for the following standard(s): Standards 12,13.14,15 People using the service experience excellent outcomes in this area. This judgement has been made using available evidence including a visit to this service. The daily life in this home suits the people who live there. They are encouraged to make choices, where possible, and they are able to participate in a range of activities, arranged to stimulate and interest them. Meals are varied and well presented. Their relatives and friends will always be made welcome when they visit. EVIDENCE: The outcomes for the people who live in this home with regard to their daily lives have improved considerably since the appointment of The Registered Manager. Considering that this is a relatively small home there is a wide range of activities organised to interest and entertain the residents. People are encouraged to exercise as much choice in their daily lives as they are able to. They get up and go to bed when they want to, they have a choice of meals every day and two of them are able to handle some of their own money. Cloyda DS0000013381.V373099.R01.S.doc Version 5.2 Page 15 They have been able to contribute to the redecoration and refurbishment of the home by choosing the furniture and carpets and some of them go to local day centres. Residents individual activities are recorded in their care plans and the manager has purchased a range of games, puzzles and DVD’s for them to enjoy. A new plasma television was purchased with money that was given to the home. Entertainers visit twice a month and there a regular outings and visits from volunteer groups. The local Brownies also visit and entertain residents with singing and dancing. The home holds a weekly cheese and wine party to which relatives are also invited and the local ice cream man includes the home on his round. Two staff members have completed a chair based exercise qualification to help residents if they want to. Spiritual needs are being addressed and there are monthly services held in the home Photographs are in the hall to show people some of the various organised activities that have taken place. The home hopes to employ a dedicated activities organiser in the future to further improve the daily lives of residents. The lunchtime meal was served during the inspection. The people that we spoke with said that they always enjoyed the meals that were served in the home. There is always a choice available and drinks and fruit are on the table for residents to have at any time throughout the day. Everyone had a drink with their meal and several residents were enjoying a glass of wine that is offered to them every day. Residents have been given the opportunity to influence the menus, which are reviewed regularly. A new chef has just been appointed and he will be meeting with them on a regular basis so that he knows what meals they would prefer. Cloyda DS0000013381.V373099.R01.S.doc Version 5.2 Page 16 Complaints and Protection The intended outcomes for Standards 16 - 18 are: 16. 17. 18. Service users and their relatives and friends are confident that their complaints will be listened to, taken seriously and acted upon. Service users’ legal rights are protected. Service users are protected from abuse. The Commission considers Standards 16 and 18 the key standards to be. JUDGEMENT – we looked at outcomes for the following standard(s): Standards 16,18 People using the service experience good outcomes in this area. This judgement has been made using available evidence including a visit to this service. The people who use this service have an appropriate system in place for the effective handling of complaints. Training, policies and procedures are in place to ensure their protection. EVIDENCE: Information is made available in the Service User Guide about how a complaint, concern or suggestion should be raised, and how this will be addressed. This information also includes details about how a concern may be referred to the Commission for Social Care Inspection. We saw that the complaints procedure is also in the entrance hall so that anyone visiting the home could read it. No complaints have been received about the home since the last inspection. The home has a copy of the Royal Borough of Kingston Council’s adult protection procedures. Staff members have all undergone training in the Protection of Vulnerable Adults since the last inspection. Recruitment procedures are in place to ensure that there is no one working in them home that has been judged as being unsuitable to be working with vulnerable people. Cloyda DS0000013381.V373099.R01.S.doc Version 5.2 Page 17 Cloyda DS0000013381.V373099.R01.S.doc Version 5.2 Page 18 Environment The intended outcomes for Standards 19 – 26 are: 19. 20. 21. 22. 23. 24. 25. 26. Service users live in a safe, well-maintained environment. Service users have access to safe and comfortable indoor and outdoor communal facilities. Service users have sufficient and suitable lavatories and washing facilities. Service users have the specialist equipment they require to maximise their independence. Service users’ own rooms suit their needs. Service users live in safe, comfortable bedrooms with their own possessions around them. Service users live in safe, comfortable surroundings. The home is clean, pleasant and hygienic. The Commission considers Standards 19 and 26 the key standards to be inspected. JUDGEMENT – we looked at outcomes for the following standard(s): Standards19, 26 People using the service experience adequate outcomes in this area. This judgement has been made using available evidence including a visit to this service. The people who use this service are living in an environment, which would benefit from further decoration and refurbishment to make it more pleasant for them and to improve their quality of life. EVIDENCE: Previous concerns about the home, including many about its decorative condition, had lead to a restriction being put on placements. Although this has since been lifted, it is disappointing to note that this work is taking a long time and that a great deal still remains to be done to bring the home up to a good standard. The lounge and dining room have been redecorated, although it was noted that the radiators still need to be covered, so that residents and staff do not burn themselves. New chairs have been purchased and it looks bright and welcoming. Cloyda DS0000013381.V373099.R01.S.doc Version 5.2 Page 19 Some bedrooms have been completed however; others and the smaller lounge, corridors and bathrooms still need to be done. There is a missing piece of floorboard in the hallway upstairs. There were plans to pave areas in the garden and provide “wander paths” but this has not happened. Additionally, the garden now needs to have fences repaired or replaced. One bedroom downstairs is just being decorated however, this will not be able to be used until the hall outside and has been finished and there is carpet on the stairs. Residents have apparently expressed a wish for one of the bathrooms to be redesigned as a wet room. It is to be hoped that the Registered Providers will be influenced by their comments when upgrading the bathroom facilities. We looked at the laundry area, which is quite cramped. In order to make it easier to keep clean and tidy it would benefit from having the walls and floor finished with an impermeable material, which is easily cleaned. It was noted that anti-bacterial hand lotions are now available however, given the rising incidence of potentially serious infections such as Clostridium Difficile amongst elderly people, it is also recommended that liquid soap and disposable hand towels should be available to staff in residents bedrooms. Cloyda DS0000013381.V373099.R01.S.doc Version 5.2 Page 20 Staffing The intended outcomes for Standards 27 – 30 are: 27. 28. 29. 30. Service users’ needs are met by the numbers and skill mix of staff. Service users are in safe hands at all times. Service users are supported and protected by the home’s recruitment policy and practices. Staff are trained and competent to do their jobs. The Commission consider all the above are key standards to be inspected. JUDGEMENT – we looked at outcomes for the following standard(s): Standards 27,28,29,30 People using the service experience adequate outcomes in this area. This judgement has been made using available evidence including a visit to this service. There are sufficient numbers of staff on duty to support the people who live in the home. However there needs to be an increased emphasis on staff training so that they have the skills to meet resident’s needs. Recruitment procedures ensure that residents are protected from those who have been judged as being unsuitable to work with vulnerable people. EVIDENCE: The home is staffed 24 hours a day by care staff, many of whom have been there for some time. This creates a continuity of care and provides familiarity for the people who live there. Rotas show that there are always enough of them on duty to support residents and spend time with them. Recruitment procedures have always been robust and no one is employed before all the relevant checks have been completed. The majority of staff have completed an NVQ level 2 qualification and some are progressing to level 3. A training matrix shows annual training that has taken place and it was noted that health and safety training and fire training has not yet been completed. Also, that there are not enough people trained in first-aid to ensure that there is always one in the home. It is recommended that there should be an increased emphasis on training and mandatory sessions must be completed yearly. It is suggested that other training might focus on the problems experienced by those people who live in Cloyda DS0000013381.V373099.R01.S.doc Version 5.2 Page 21 the home. This will ensure that staff are able to deliver care in a person centred way. The Registered Manager is aware of the need to increase the amount of training for staff however; gaining the funding for this has been slow. Money will need to be made available for this training. Cloyda DS0000013381.V373099.R01.S.doc Version 5.2 Page 22 Management and Administration The intended outcomes for Standards 31 – 38 are: 31. 32. 33. 34. 35. 36. 37. 38. Service users live in a home which is run and managed by a person who is fit to be in charge, of good character and able to discharge his or her responsibilities fully. Service users benefit from the ethos, leadership and management approach of the home. The home is run in the best interests of service users. Service users are safeguarded by the accounting and financial procedures of the home. Service users’ financial interests are safeguarded. Staff are appropriately supervised. Service users’ rights and best interests are safeguarded by the home’s record keeping, policies and procedures. The health, safety and welfare of service users and staff are promoted and protected. The Commission considers Standards 31, 33, 35 and 38 the key standards to be inspected. JUDGEMENT – we looked at outcomes for the following standard(s): Standards 31,33,35,38 People using the service experience good outcomes in this area. This judgement has been made using available evidence including a visit to this service. The people who use this service live in a home which is being run by someone competent to do so, and in their best interests however, some restrictions prevent her from discharging her role as would be expected. EVIDENCE: The Registered Manager Ms Louise Sutton has many years experience of working with elderly people. She displayed enthusiasm and a commitment to improving the status of the home and the lives of those people who are using the service. She undertakes regular training to ensure that her skills and competence are updated and monitors the work of carers through regular supervision and appraisals. The manager is supported by a deputy who has worked at the home for many years and staff turnover is low. This provides a stable environment for residents allowing them to feel comfortable and safe and provides direction and leadership for staff. Cloyda DS0000013381.V373099.R01.S.doc Version 5.2 Page 23 The Registered Providers of this home are Mr and Mrs Patel although; over the last year their son has been assuming day-to-day control. At the time of this inspection he was abroad. It would seem that the manager’s job description does not seem to have enabled her to take responsibility for fulfilling her role in the way that would be expected. She has been given limited budgetary control of the home, which has lead to delays in funding staff training, including mandatory training, difficulties in food ordering and to the purchasing of equipment for the home. Also she has not been able to access supervision for herself in order to discuss her performance and identify any training needs. It is recommended that consideration should be given to addressing this situation, as there is a risk that it could affect the homes rating in the future. There are regular meetings in the home for residents and their relatives to enable them to discuss what is happening in the home and suggest ideas for the future. In this way the décor of the new sitting room was decided. One of these meetings had raised the possibility of converting a bathroom into a shower room however, this has not happened as yet. It is to be hoped that the Registered Providers will continue to allow residents comments to influence the way that the home is run. Records show that services and equipment are generally maintained as necessary and all of the previous requirements that were issued by the fire officer have been addressed. It was noted that the electrical installation is due to be serviced this month. The last visit by the environmental health officer resulted in some improvements being required with regard to kitchen practices. These have now been complied with. Cloyda DS0000013381.V373099.R01.S.doc Version 5.2 Page 24 SCORING OF OUTCOMES This page summarises the assessment of the extent to which the National Minimum Standards for Care Homes for Older People have been met and uses the following scale. The scale ranges from: 4 Standard Exceeded 2 Standard Almost Met (Commendable) (Minor Shortfalls) 3 Standard Met 1 Standard Not Met (No Shortfalls) (Major Shortfalls) “X” in the standard met box denotes standard not assessed on this occasion “N/A” in the standard met box denotes standard not applicable CHOICE OF HOME Standard No Score 1 2 3 4 5 6 ENVIRONMENT Standard No Score 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 X X 3 X X N/A HEALTH AND PERSONAL CARE Standard No Score 7 3 8 3 9 3 10 3 11 X DAILY LIFE AND SOCIAL ACTIVITIES Standard No Score 12 4 13 4 14 4 15 4 COMPLAINTS AND PROTECTION Standard No Score 16 3 17 X 18 3 2 X X X X X X 2 STAFFING Standard No Score 27 3 28 3 29 3 30 1 MANAGEMENT AND ADMINISTRATION Standard No 31 32 33 34 35 36 37 38 Score 2 X 3 X 3 X X 3 Cloyda DS0000013381.V373099.R01.S.doc Version 5.2 Page 25 Are there any outstanding requirements from the last inspection? NO STATUTORY REQUIREMENTS This section sets out the actions, which must be taken so that the registered person/s meets the Care Standards Act 2000, Care Homes Regulations 2001 and the National Minimum Standards. The Registered Provider(s) must comply with the given timescales. No. 1 Standard OP30 Regulation 18 Requirement All care staff must update mandatory training yearly to ensure the safety of both themselves and the people who live in the home. Timescale for action 31/01/09 Cloyda DS0000013381.V373099.R01.S.doc Version 5.2 Page 26 RECOMMENDATIONS These recommendations relate to National Minimum Standards and are seen as good practice for the Registered Provider/s to consider carrying out. No. 1 Refer to Standard OP19 Good Practice Recommendations It is recommended that the redecoration and refurbishment of the home should be completed more quickly in order to provide a pleasant environment for residents to live in. It is recommended that liquid soap and disposable hand towels should be provided next to washbasins in resident’s rooms to help with infection control procedures. It is recommended that laundry walls and floors should be replaced with materials that are easy to keep clean to help with infection control procedures It is recommended that staff training should be provided which focuses on the problems that are experienced by the people who live in the home so that staff develop a greater understanding of their needs. It is recommended that the Registered Managers job description be revised in order for her to be able to fulfil her duties fully. 2 3 4 OP26 OP26 OP30 5 OP31 Cloyda DS0000013381.V373099.R01.S.doc Version 5.2 Page 27 Commission for Social Care Inspection London Regional Office 4th Floor Caledonia House 223 Pentonville Road London N1 9NG National Enquiry Line: Telephone: 0845 015 0120 or 0191 233 3323 Textphone: 0845 015 2255 or 0191 233 3588 Email: enquiries@csci.gsi.gov.uk Web: www.csci.org.uk © This report is copyright Commission for Social Care Inspection (CSCI) and may only be used in its entirety. Extracts may not be used or reproduced without the express permission of CSCI Cloyda DS0000013381.V373099.R01.S.doc Version 5.2 Page 28 - Please note that this information is included on www.bestcarehome.co.uk under license from the regulator. Re-publishing this information is in breach of the terms of use of that website. 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