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Care Home: Glynn House

  • 24 Flint Green Birmingham B27 6QA
  • Tel: 01212440935
  • Fax: 01212440935
  • Planned feature Advertise here!

Glynn House is a care home offering residential care for up to 5 younger adults, men and women with a learning disability. There are currently two young men living at the home. The home is located in a residential area of Acocks Green in Birmingham and there are a range of community facilities nearby. These include shops, pubs, restaurants, sports clubs, places of worship and public transport links. People are able to park their cars on the road at the front of the home. There is a spacious garden for all people living at the home to use. The home has been refurbished to a high standard and offers a homely living environment. Accommodation is provided over three floors and bedrooms offer single occupancy with an en suite facility consisting of shower and toilet. The home is not suitable for people with mobility problems as stairs provide access to the upper floor rooms. This information is reflected within the statement of purpose. There is information of interest to people living at the home and their visitors on display at the home. There are no previous inspection reports for this service as this is the first inspection. The range of fees charged to live at the home is not included within the service user guide but is available from the home on request. We were told that the costs are met by the local authority based on the individual needs of people living there. Items excluded from the accommodation fee include personal clothing, toiletries and some leisure activities.

  • Latitude: 52.448001861572
    Longitude: -1.8259999752045
  • Manager: David Howard Newman
  • Price p/w: -
  • UK
  • Total Capacity: 5
  • Type: Care home only
  • Provider: Lindale Homes Ltd
  • Ownership: Private
  • Care Home ID: 18706
Residents Needs:
Learning disability

Latest Inspection

This is the latest available inspection report for this service, carried out on 18th March 2009. CSCI has not published a star rating for this report, though using similar criteria we estimate that the report is Adequate. The way we rate inspection reports is consistent for all houses, though please be aware that this may be different from an official CSCI judgement.

The inspector made no statutory requirements on the home as a result of this inspection and there were no outstanding actions from the previous inspection report.

For extracts, read the latest CQC inspection for Glynn House.

What the care home does well Information is made available to people before they visit the home so that they can make an informed choice about whether to move in. People`s needs are assessed before they move into the home so they can be confident their needs will be met there. People told us that they were happy living at the home. There are lots of opportunities for people to make decisions about their lives so that they do things for themselves, go out often and have a chance to practice their skills and stay as independent as possible. Plans that explain how to care for people and help them stay safe are well written so that people`s needs are understood and met. People are supported by staff who are enthusiastic, understanding and are deemed to be suitable to work with younger adults. People have access to a range of health and social care professionals and this should ensure that their health care needs are met. People are supported to keep in touch with their families and friends so that they do not lose relationships that are important to them. People living at the home are involved in preparing a variety of healthy meals, and these meet any taste preferences. People are provided with a homely living environment and are encouraged to personalise their rooms with items that are familiar to them, so that they are relaxed in their surroundings. There are good procedures to listen to people and keep them safe from possible harm. Health and safety is well managed so that people live in a safe home. People living at the home and staff told us: "I feel safe and happy living here". "I do my own food shopping. We write down what we want". "I like it here. The staff are very good". "This is a great home. The staff are very enthusiastic and excited about it here". "I was really happy to get this job. I am the same age as the people living here so we can relate to each other. We like doing the same things". What has improved since the last inspection? This is the first visit to the service. What the care home could do better: Health plans should be developed so that peoples` conditions are monitored to find out if treatments are effective. Systems need to be developed so that the home`s staff can check whether people receive the correct medication. CARE HOME ADULTS 18-65 Glynn House 24 Flint Green Birmingham B27 6QA Lead Inspector Amanda Lyndon Key Unannounced Inspection 18th March 2009 11:00 Glynn House DS0000072913.V374426.R01.S.doc Version 5.2 Page 1 The Commission for Social Care Inspection aims to: • • • • Put the people who use social care first Improve services and stamp out bad practice Be an expert voice on social care Practise what we preach in our own organisation Reader Information Document Purpose Author Audience Further copies from Copyright Inspection Report CSCI General Public 0870 240 7535 (telephone order line) This report is copyright Commission for Social Care Inspection (CSCI) and may only be used in its entirety. Extracts may not be used or reproduced without the express permission of CSCI www.csci.org.uk Internet address Glynn House DS0000072913.V374426.R01.S.doc Version 5.2 Page 2 This is a report of an inspection to assess whether services are meeting the needs of people who use them. The legal basis for conducting inspections is the Care Standards Act 2000 and the relevant National Minimum Standards for this establishment are those for Care Homes for Adults 18-65. They can be found at www.dh.gov.uk or obtained from The Stationery Office (TSO) PO Box 29, St Crispins, Duke Street, Norwich, NR3 1GN. Tel: 0870 600 5522. Online ordering: www.tso.co.uk/bookshop This report is a public document. Extracts may not be used or reproduced without the prior permission of the Commission for Social Care Inspection. Glynn House DS0000072913.V374426.R01.S.doc Version 5.2 Page 3 SERVICE INFORMATION Name of service Glynn House Address 24 Flint Green Birmingham B27 6QA Telephone number Fax number Email address Provider Web address Name of registered provider(s)/company (if applicable) Name of registered manager (if applicable) Type of registration No. of places registered (if applicable) 0121 244 0935 0121 244 0935 Lindale Homes Ltd David Howard Newman Care Home 5 Category(ies) of Learning disability (5) registration, with number of places Glynn House DS0000072913.V374426.R01.S.doc Version 5.2 Page 4 SERVICE INFORMATION Conditions of registration: 1. The Registered person may provide the following category of service only: Care Home only To service users of the following gender: Either Whose primary care needs on admission to the home are within the following categories: 2. Learning disability (LD) 5 The maximum number of service users to be accommodated is: 5 Date of last inspection This is the service’s first inspection Brief Description of the Service: Glynn House is a care home offering residential care for up to 5 younger adults, men and women with a learning disability. There are currently two young men living at the home. The home is located in a residential area of Acocks Green in Birmingham and there are a range of community facilities nearby. These include shops, pubs, restaurants, sports clubs, places of worship and public transport links. People are able to park their cars on the road at the front of the home. There is a spacious garden for all people living at the home to use. The home has been refurbished to a high standard and offers a homely living environment. Accommodation is provided over three floors and bedrooms offer single occupancy with an en suite facility consisting of shower and toilet. The home is not suitable for people with mobility problems as stairs provide access to the upper floor rooms. This information is reflected within the statement of purpose. There is information of interest to people living at the home and their visitors on display at the home. There are no previous inspection reports for this service as this is the first inspection. The range of fees charged to live at the home is not included within the service user guide but is available from the home on request. We were told that the costs are met by the local authority based on the individual needs of people living there. Items excluded from the accommodation fee include personal clothing, toiletries and some leisure activities. Glynn House DS0000072913.V374426.R01.S.doc Version 5.2 Page 5 SUMMARY This is an overview of what the inspector found during the inspection. The quality rating for this service is two stars. This means that people who use this service experience good quality outcomes. The focus of our inspections is upon outcomes for people who live in the home and their views of the service provided. This process considers the care home’s capacity to meet regulatory requirements, minimum standards of practice and focuses on areas that need further development. Glynn House was registered in September 2008. Since then, time has been spent recruiting and training staff in preparation for the first people to come to stay there at the end of January 2009. This was our first inspection at the home and there were two people living there. The visit to the home was undertaken by one inspector over one day and We, the commission, were assisted throughout by the registered manager. The home knew that we were visiting as we had arranged to be there at a time that the people living there were at home. Prior to the visit taking place, we looked at all the information that we had received or asked for. We received a comprehensive Annual Quality Assurance Assessment (AQAA). This tells us how the home think they are performing in order to meet the needs of people living there. It also gives us some numerical information about staff and people living at the home. We sent out questionnaires to the two people who live at the home in order to obtain their views about the service provided. Both of them returned questionnaires to us and their comments are included in this report. Both people were case tracked. This involves discovering their experiences of living at the home and focuses on the outcomes for these people. We spent time speaking with both people living at the home and two staff members. We observed care practices and sampled care, staffing and health and safety records. We looked around the areas of the home used by these people to make sure it was warm, clean and comfortable for people. No immediate requirements were made at the time of the visit. This means that there was nothing urgent that needed to be done to make sure people stayed safe and well. Glynn House DS0000072913.V374426.R01.S.doc Version 5.2 Page 6 What the service does well: Information is made available to people before they visit the home so that they can make an informed choice about whether to move in. People’s needs are assessed before they move into the home so they can be confident their needs will be met there. People told us that they were happy living at the home. There are lots of opportunities for people to make decisions about their lives so that they do things for themselves, go out often and have a chance to practice their skills and stay as independent as possible. Plans that explain how to care for people and help them stay safe are well written so that people’s needs are understood and met. People are supported by staff who are enthusiastic, understanding and are deemed to be suitable to work with younger adults. People have access to a range of health and social care professionals and this should ensure that their health care needs are met. People are supported to keep in touch with their families and friends so that they do not lose relationships that are important to them. People living at the home are involved in preparing a variety of healthy meals, and these meet any taste preferences. People are provided with a homely living environment and are encouraged to personalise their rooms with items that are familiar to them, so that they are relaxed in their surroundings. There are good procedures to listen to people and keep them safe from possible harm. Health and safety is well managed so that people live in a safe home. People living at the home and staff told us: “I feel safe and happy living here”. “I do my own food shopping. We write down what we want”. “I like it here. The staff are very good”. “This is a great home. The staff are very enthusiastic and excited about it here”. Glynn House DS0000072913.V374426.R01.S.doc Version 5.2 Page 7 “I was really happy to get this job. I am the same age as the people living here so we can relate to each other. We like doing the same things”. What has improved since the last inspection? What they could do better: Please contact the provider for advice of actions taken in response to this inspection. The report of this inspection is available from enquiries@csci.gsi.gov.uk or by contacting your local CSCI office. The summary of this inspection report can be made available in other formats on request. Glynn House DS0000072913.V374426.R01.S.doc Version 5.2 Page 8 DETAILS OF INSPECTOR FINDINGS CONTENTS Choice of Home (Standards 1–5) Individual Needs and Choices (Standards 6-10) Lifestyle (Standards 11-17) Personal and Healthcare Support (Standards 18-21) Concerns, Complaints and Protection (Standards 22-23) Environment (Standards 24-30) Staffing (Standards 31-36) Conduct and Management of the Home (Standards 37 – 43) Scoring of Outcomes Statutory Requirements Identified During the Inspection Glynn House DS0000072913.V374426.R01.S.doc Version 5.2 Page 9 Choice of Home The intended outcomes for Standards 1 – 5 are: 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. Prospective service users have the information they need to make an informed choice about where to live. Prospective users’ individual aspirations and needs are assessed. Prospective service users know that the home that they will choose will meet their needs and aspirations. Prospective service users have an opportunity to visit and to “test drive” the home. Each service user has an individual written contract or statement of terms and conditions with the home. The Commission consider Standard 2 the key standard to be inspected. JUDGEMENT – we looked at outcomes for the following standard(s): 1, 2 & 4 Quality in this outcome area is good This judgement has been made using available evidence including a visit to this service. People have sufficient information to enable them to make an informed decision about whether they would like to live at the home. People’s needs are assessed before they move into the home so they can be confident their needs will be met there. EVIDENCE: The aim of Glynn House is to provide a homely, safe and inclusive living environment in which people develop self confidence and life skills. We saw that people are given a home folder, consisting of a service user guide, statement of purpose and service user handbook. Information is provided about forthcoming dates of group meetings involving people living at the home, house rules, and information about local places of interest and places of worship. The complaints and fire procedures are also included. The fee rates for the home were not included in this information, and this is recommended so that people know how much it would cost to live there. Information was Glynn House DS0000072913.V374426.R01.S.doc Version 5.2 Page 10 produced in a larger print format and we were told that this information could be produced in different formats and languages on request. The staff hand book includes information in a picture format about how people can expect the staff team to support them. There are currently two young men living at the home and both of these people had come to live there at the end of January 2009. Both people told us that they were asked if they wanted to move into the home and confirmed that it was there decision to live there. Both people and their families had viewed the home, chosen their bedrooms and asked any questions that they may have had. The men knew each other prior to coming to live at Glynn House and this has helped them to settle into living there. People told us that they had got to know each other even better since living at the home. We were told that prior to admission, people could visit the home as often as they liked, including tea and overnight visits. This helped people to prepare to move in. Assessments of peoples’ care needs were undertaken prior to coming to live at the home. This is in order to determine whether their care needs could be met there. Records sampled confirmed that people come to live at the home on a trial period of twenty eight days and following this a care review is undertaken involving people, their social worker, people important to them and the home’s staff. This provides all present with the opportunity to discuss whether the support provided is meeting the person’s assessed care needs and whether they wish to remain at the home. We saw that actions had been taken in response to any issues raised during these meetings. For example, one person required a dental appointment, and this was arranged. The home is looking to have a respite care facility so that people can come to stay there for short periods of time in order to have a break from their normal daily lives. One person said “I feel safe and happy living here”. Glynn House DS0000072913.V374426.R01.S.doc Version 5.2 Page 11 Individual Needs and Choices The intended outcomes for Standards 6 – 10 are: 6. 7. 8. 9. 10. Service users know their assessed and changing needs and personal goals are reflected in their individual Plan. Service users make decisions about their lives with assistance as needed. Service users are consulted on, and participate in, all aspects of life in the home. Service users are supported to take risks as part of an independent lifestyle. Service users know that information about them is handled appropriately, and that their confidences are kept. The Commission considers Standards 6, 7 and 9 the key standards to be inspected. JUDGEMENT – we looked at outcomes for the following standard(s): 6, 7, 8 & 9 Quality in this outcome area is good This judgement has been made using available evidence including a visit to this service. People that live in the home receive good support to make choices and decisions about their day-to day lives. EVIDENCE: On coming to live at the home, assessments of peoples’ individual care needs are undertaken, taking into account their culture, religion, race, disability and sexual orientation. Care plans are devised from this information. These are individualised plans about what the person is able to do independently and states what support is required from staff in order to meet the person’s needs. Care plans were sampled for both people living at the home. It was evident from the records that people are involved in the development and review of Glynn House DS0000072913.V374426.R01.S.doc Version 5.2 Page 12 their care plans. Care plans gave detailed information about how staff should support people in order to meet their individual needs. These had been written in good detail so that people should receive care and support in the ways they prefer. A key worker system was in place so that a designated staff member will work alongside each person living at the home in order to understand their specific needs better. One staff member said “ I know what one person would like and the other person doesn’t”. Each person had plans for staff to follow for behavioural management. The format was easy to understand and included triggers to behaviours, warning signs and how staff should respond to ensure behaviour is managed consistently and safely. From discussions with staff and observing practice at the home, it was evident that staff met during the visit had a good knowledge of this so that the appropriate support was provided. A record of any behaviours displayed was kept so that an assessment of these could be undertaken. It was evident that strategies used to minimise the risk of behaviours was consistent for the times that people were either at home or at college. As a result of this, records identified that strategies in place were effective. The home completes risk assessments for people so that consideration is given to supporting them to take responsible risks and promote their independence. Staff were able to describe the measures in place to reduce known risks to individual’s health and well being. It is expected that these will be further developed as the care plans develop and staff get to know people better. Safe handling plans identified that both people living at the home were fully mobile with no assistance required in this area. From discussion with staff and people who live in the home it was evident that people are encouraged to maintain and develop their independence. Realistic individual goals are agreed with people living at the home and tasks are broken down into steps so that progress can be tracked until people are competent in these areas. From discussions with people living at the home, staff and sampling of records we evidence that people have choices and make their own decisions about their daily lives. This includes the times they get up (apart from on a college day), the times they go to bed, how they spend their leisure time, what they eat, who they spend their time with what is bought for the house and what they spend their money on. People have their own key for the front door and a key to rooms so that they have independence and privacy in this area. Although people had only recently come to live at the home, there had already been a number of group meetings arranged involving people living there and the staff team. One of these meetings had been instigated by one of the people living there in order to discuss “House Rules”. This means that people who live there are involved in decisions about the home and are given the Glynn House DS0000072913.V374426.R01.S.doc Version 5.2 Page 13 opportunity to discuss anything they want or would like to change. The minutes of these were available and identified that people living at the home are involved in the minute taking and decided when the meeting was to be concluded. As a result of suggestions made during a recent meeting, arrangements had been made for people to go bowling, swimming, out for pub meals and an information board had been provided in the conservatory. The minutes of recent meetings were on display in the home and were produced in a large print format so people could read them. Dates of forthcoming meetings were on display so that people could choose if they wanted to attend. Glynn House DS0000072913.V374426.R01.S.doc Version 5.2 Page 14 Lifestyle The intended outcomes for Standards 11 - 17 are: 11. 12. 13. 14. 15. 16. 17. Service users have opportunities for personal development. Service users are able to take part in age, peer and culturally appropriate activities. Service users are part of the local community. Service users engage in appropriate leisure activities. Service users have appropriate personal, family and sexual relationships. Service users’ rights are respected and responsibilities recognised in their daily lives. Service users are offered a healthy diet and enjoy their meals and mealtimes. The Commission considers Standards 12, 13, 15, 16 and 17 the key standards to be inspected. JUDGEMENT – we looked at outcomes for the following standard(s): 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16 & 17 Quality in this outcome area is good This judgement has been made using available evidence including a visit to this service. People who live in the home experience a meaningful lifestyle that promotes their independence and is reflective of their individual needs and interests. EVIDENCE: Both of the people living at the home attend college on a full time basis and as previously discussed, it was evident that there was good communication between the home’s staff and college staff for the benefit of the personal development of the people living at Glynn House. People told us that they devised their own weekly activity programmes, with the support of staff. The plans were on display in the home and a copy was provided in peoples’ bedrooms so that they could refer to these at any times Glynn House DS0000072913.V374426.R01.S.doc Version 5.2 Page 15 they liked. People are encouraged to pursue the activities that they are interested in thus leading fulfilling, healthy and stimulating lifestyles. These include trips to local social clubs, sports clubs, parties, an art gallery and music lessons. One person said “They are looking to get me into a snooker club. I am learning how to play and have my own cue. I love my lap top and listening to my music. I hope to win X Factor so I will be famous”. People are encouraged to pursue their talents for example one person living at the home is very artistic and easel and painting equipment was available. People told us that they had enjoyed their recent stay at their holiday cottage in Wales with the support of staff. Records sampled identified that activities are evaluated to determine how effective they have been and how competent the people are at doing them. Peoples’ comments about whether they enjoyed the activity were included and this information is used when planning forthcoming events. One person likes to go to church every Sunday morning and staff provide support so that he can do this. People told us that they visit friends and relatives and that their visitors are made welcome at the home. One person told us how he enjoyed his sister visiting him Glynn House and how he enjoyed cooking his family a meal recently. One person spoke about a friend who lived a distance away and stated that the staff team support him to maintain contact with this person. Records sampled identified that staff inform people important to people living at the home about any changes to care provided. People are involved in drawing up the weekly household task rota. This means that people are encouraged and supported to develop life skills such as doing their laundry, cleaning and tidying their bedrooms, getting their clothes ready for the next day and washing up after meals. We were told that the home was looking to build a “training flat” that would be fully equipped to assess peoples’ life skills and develop these skills. People living at the home are involved in the planning, preparation and cooking of their meals. Both people devise a weekly shopping list, participate in food shopping and budgeting for this. One person said “I do my own food shopping. We write down what we want”. Fridges and cupboards were well stocked, including fresh and frozen foods and a variety of healthy and not so healthy snacks that the people living there choose to eat. People living at the home confirmed that there was always food available for them to eat at the times that they wanted to so that they were never hungry. People told us that they enjoyed going out for meals on occasions and we were told that a particular restaurant is a favourite as it is a quieter venue. Glynn House DS0000072913.V374426.R01.S.doc Version 5.2 Page 16 Menus identified a variety of nutritious meals and reflected their cultural and taste preferences and healthy lifestyles. Photographs are being taken in order to produce menus in picture format making them easier to understand. Mealtimes were flexible to fit in with peoples’ daily activities. People living at the home take it in turns to cook the evening meal after college. One person said “I like my food here. I like beefburgers and chips. I cook them myself. I can cook salad aswell”. On the day of our visit, one person prepared hot chicken wraps and salad with the support and encouragement of a staff member. The other person was responsible for laying the table and washing up after the meal. We saw that staff sat down with the people living at the home whilst they were having their evening meal, talking about their trip to the local bowling alley that evening and this promotes a social occasion. Glynn House DS0000072913.V374426.R01.S.doc Version 5.2 Page 17 Personal and Healthcare Support The intended outcomes for Standards 18 - 21 are: 18. 19. 20. 21. Service users receive personal support in the way they prefer and require. Service users’ physical and emotional health needs are met. Service users retain, administer and control their own medication where appropriate, and are protected by the home’s policies and procedures for dealing with medicines. The ageing, illness and death of a service user are handled with respect and as the individual would wish. The Commission considers Standards 18, 19, and 20 the key standards to be inspected. JUDGEMENT – we looked at outcomes for the following standard(s): 18, 19 & 20 Quality in this outcome area is good This judgement has been made using available evidence including a visit to this service. There are effective systems in place to meet peoples’ personal and health care needs. EVIDENCE: Both people living at the home are young adults under the age of twenty years and lead healthy and active lifestyles. The personal and health care plans of both people living at the home were sampled at this visit. There was some good information about individuals’ personal care needs and preferences, which staff clearly understood so that people receive care in a manner that prefer. People who live at Glynn House have the skills to manage the majority of their personal care with only minimal staff support. This was reflected in their Glynn House DS0000072913.V374426.R01.S.doc Version 5.2 Page 18 individual plans to ensure that they were encouraged to do as much for themselves in order to develop their independence. We saw that people are supported to buy clothing that is appropriate for their age, gender and lifestyles. We saw that people buy their preferred personal care products so that they had a choice about this. Care plans had been written about the support required so that people can communicate effectively. These gave details of the abilities of people in this area and included specific instructions about ways staff can assist people in this area and the reasons for this. Records showed that people have regular appointments with health and social care professionals and the outcome of this contact had been documented so that staff had accurate information about individuals’ state of health. People can retain their own doctors when coming to live at the home, if the doctor is in agreement. Otherwise support is provided to register with a new doctor. Information was available about health conditions of people living at the home and these are being further developed into health plans so that they are personalised to reflect peoples’ individual needs. These are being produced in a booklet format and will include information relevant to the persons’ health care needs. This means that should a person need to go into hospital, the booklet including all relevant information will accompany them. Staff met during the visit had good knowledge of peoples’ care and support needs. The management of medication was reviewed and staff responsible for this had undertaken training in this area. In addition, ten staff members were enrolled at a local college to undertake further training in this area. People were on small amounts of medication and there were no controlled drugs at the home. Neither of the people self administered their own medication, however we were told that a programme was being introduced to promote peoples’ knowledge and independence in this area. There were guidelines available to instruct staff when to administer a pain killer to a person living at the home and this ensures that the person received this as required. We were not able to audit stock balances of medication held at the home as a rolling balance of quantities held was not kept. We were told, however, that plans were in place to rectify this once the next monthly order was received. The system in place for recording medication taken out of and brought back into the home for people on leave should be reviewed so that it can be determined whether the person has received their medication as prescribed. Glynn House DS0000072913.V374426.R01.S.doc Version 5.2 Page 19 Concerns, Complaints and Protection The intended outcomes for Standards 22 – 23 are: 22. 23. Service users feel their views are listened to and acted on. Service users are protected from abuse, neglect and self-harm. The Commission considers Standards 22, and 23 the key standards to be inspected. JUDGEMENT – we looked at outcomes for the following standard(s): 22 & 23 Quality in this outcome area is good This judgement has been made using available evidence including a visit to this service. Arrangements ensure that the views of people living at the home are listened to and they are safeguarded from harm. EVIDENCE: The complaints procedure was not on display however we were told that this would be rectified without delay. The complaints procedure was, however included in information available in peoples’ bedrooms so that people know how to make a complaint if they need to. We were told that this information could be produced in other formats and languages on request. Complaint, comment and feedback forms were available for people to complete in order to make suggestions for improvements about the service provided at the home. We have not received any complaints about Glynn House and the home has not received any complaints. Both people told us that they would speak to the staff if they were not happy. There was an adult protection policy in place and this had the local multi agency guidelines to follow. This ensures that staff have guidelines to follow in the event of an allegation being made. There have been no allegations of an adult protection nature made at the home and staff had received training in this area. Staff told us that knew what actions to take should an allegation of Glynn House DS0000072913.V374426.R01.S.doc Version 5.2 Page 20 an adult protection nature be made. This means that people should be protected from harm. Both people living at the home need assistance to manage their money. There are systems in place to record individuals’ income and expenditure, which are audited for their ongoing protection. We saw that people are supported to buy presents and greeting cards for people important to them, in order to celebrate special occasions. People are supported to visit the bank in order to develop skills in this area. An up to date inventory of peoples’ belongings is maintained so that staff can keep track if anything goes missing and look after peoples’ possessions. Glynn House DS0000072913.V374426.R01.S.doc Version 5.2 Page 21 Environment The intended outcomes for Standards 24 – 30 are: 24. 25. 26. 27. 28. 29. 30. Service users live in a homely, comfortable and safe environment. Service users’ bedrooms suit their needs and lifestyles. Service users’ bedrooms promote their independence. Service users’ toilets and bathrooms provide sufficient privacy and meet their individual needs. Shared spaces complement and supplement service users’ individual rooms. Service users have the specialist equipment they require to maximise their independence. The home is clean and hygienic. The Commission considers Standards 24, and 30 the key standards to be inspected. JUDGEMENT – we looked at outcomes for the following standard(s): 24, 25, 26, 27, 28 & 30 Quality in this outcome area is good This judgement has been made using available evidence including a visit to this service. People live in a clean, safe and comfortable environment that meets their needs. EVIDENCE: Glynn House is situated in a residential area of Acocks Green in Birmingham. There are a range of shops, sports clubs, pubs and public transport routes within walking distance. This is important to the people who live there as they make regular use of these amenities. The home is suitable for its intended purpose, of providing domestic style accommodation and care in an ordinary environment. The home looks no different to others in the area and is not distinguishable as a care home. Glynn House DS0000072913.V374426.R01.S.doc Version 5.2 Page 22 Prior to registering with us, the building had been refurbished to a high standard and provided a homely living environment that is fit for purpose. Since coming to live there, people have been involved in buying items for the home, for example, household appliances and small items of furniture. There is a spacious back garden for all people living at the home to use. People told us that they were involved in a project to develop this area. All bedrooms offer single occupancy and have an en suite consisting of a shower and toilet. In response to a suggestion made by people living at the home, new dials had been fitted to the showers so that people could use these independently. All bedrooms were spacious and furniture was of a good quality. These had been personalised to reflect the age, gender and interests of the people living at the home and people were able to re decorate if they wished. We saw that peoples’ privacy is respected and staff knock on bedroom doors in order to ask for permission prior to entering. Accommodation is provided over three floors with stairs providing access to the upper floor rooms. This means that the home is not suitable for people with mobility problems. This is reflected in the statement of purpose so that people are aware of this prior to viewing the home. We were told that there was currently no need for aids or adaptations. There is a spacious kitchen/diner and people living at the home have been involved in purchasing items for this. People living at the home have a choice of eating at the table in the kitchen or eating at the large dining table in the conservatory. There is a separate comfortable lounge equipped with widescreen TV, satellite TV, computer games consoles and other equipment that reflected the ages and interests of the people living there. People living at the home are involved in ensuring that the home is kept clean and fresh. Sampling of household rotas and our observations during the visit confirmed that this was the case. There is a utility room consisting of washing machine, tumble dryer, ironing board and iron so that people have the appropriate equipment to wash and iron their personal clothing and bed linen. Glynn House DS0000072913.V374426.R01.S.doc Version 5.2 Page 23 Staffing The intended outcomes for Standards 31 – 36 are: 31. 32. 33. 34. 35. 36. Service users benefit from clarity of staff roles and responsibilities. Service users are supported by competent and qualified staff. Service users are supported by an effective staff team. Service users are supported and protected by the home’s recruitment policy and practices. Service users’ individual and joint needs are met by appropriately trained staff. Service users benefit from well supported and supervised staff. The Commission considers Standards 32, 34 and 35 the key standards to be inspected. JUDGEMENT – we looked at outcomes for the following standard(s): 32, 33, 34 & 35 Quality in this outcome area is good This judgement has been made using available evidence including a visit to this service. People are supported by staff who have good understanding of their individual needs. The recruitment procedure protects people from harm. EVIDENCE: The registered manager had recently recruited a staff team who were deemed to be suitable to work with younger adults. We were told that the staffing levels would be adjusted to reflect the developing service provided at the home. The building is empty during the hours that the people living there are at college, however arrangements are in place so that people can contact a staff member in an emergency or should they have to return home early. In addition, people living at the home have the registered manager’s telephone number so that they can contact him at any time they like. Glynn House DS0000072913.V374426.R01.S.doc Version 5.2 Page 24 We were told that, and staffing rotas identified that, there were at least two care staff on duty after college and at weekends so that people were fully supported and activities could be provided. One staff member is on duty overnight. The cultural mix of staff reflected that of people living at the home so that care was provided in an understanding manner. One staff member said “I was really happy to get this job. I am the same age as the people living here so we can relate to each other. We like doing the same things”. There were no staff vacancies, however we were told that they were hoping to develop a team of casual staff to cover staff holidays. There has been no staff sickness and no agency staff used and this means that people are supported by people who are familiar with their care needs. People living at the home told us that they take part in the selection of new staff so that they have a say in who supports them. Staff recruitment files sampled contained all necessary information about the people prior to starting work at the home in order to safeguard people living there. New people, who work at the home, receive induction training which lasts over two weeks and is based upon New Common Induction Standards for Care. Staff met during the visit confirmed that this had provided them with the necessary skills and knowledge to support people living at the home. The home has a rolling programme of training so that staff have access to regular sessions and updates to assist them to care for the people who live there. Training records showed that staff had recently undertaken training in a number of areas including how to promote diversity, person centred care, disability awareness and behaviour management. Records sampled identified that staff had also undertaken recent training in health and safety issues, for example, food hygiene, fire safety, emergency first aid, safe lifting and handling and infection control training. This should provide people with a safe living environment. People living at the home have taken part in first aid, fire safety training and fire drills so that they know what to expect in an emergency. Plans are in place to introduce a “training club” in order to update staff on training issues and staff are enrolling in a learning disability training course. There are currently 50 of staff who have completed a National Vocational Qualification (NVQ) Level 2 in care. This should ensure that the staff have the knowledge and skills to care for people living at the home. The two staff on duty on the afternoon of the visit took an active part in the inspection process and were able to answer our questions about people’s care and support needs with confidence. The interaction between staff and people who live in the home was relaxed and friendly, which indicates that positive relationships have been formed. In the surveys returned to us, people told us that the staff treated them well. Glynn House DS0000072913.V374426.R01.S.doc Version 5.2 Page 25 One person said “I like it here. The staff are very good”. One staff member told us “This is a great home. The staff are very enthusiastic and excited about it here”. Records identified that staff meetings are held regularly. This means that staff are involved in the running of the home and are kept up to date with training and development opportunities. Glynn House DS0000072913.V374426.R01.S.doc Version 5.2 Page 26 Conduct and Management of the Home The intended outcomes for Standards 37 – 43 are: 37. 38. 39. 40. 41. 42. 43. Service users benefit from a well run home. Service users benefit from the ethos, leadership and management approach of the home. Service users are confident their views underpin all self-monitoring, review and development by the home. Service users’ rights and best interests are safeguarded by the home’s policies and procedures. Service users’ rights and best interests are safeguarded by the home’s record keeping policies and procedures. The health, safety and welfare of service users are promoted and protected. Service users benefit from competent and accountable management of the service. The Commission considers Standards 37, 39, and 42 the key standards to be inspected. JUDGEMENT – we looked at outcomes for the following standard(s): 37, 39 & 42 Quality in this outcome area is good This judgement has been made using available evidence including a visit to this service. The home is run in the best interests of the people living there, ensuring their safety and well being. EVIDENCE: The registered person is also the registered manager of Glynn House. He has numerous years’ experience of caring for younger adults who have a learning disability and in management roles. He has completed the registered managers award and also has a higher diploma in the management of care services. He is a qualified trainer. Glynn House DS0000072913.V374426.R01.S.doc Version 5.2 Page 27 It was evident that a good rapport had built up between the manager, people living at the home and the staff team. Staff told us that they had full support from the management team and that the registered manager was an excellent trainer. The manager is supported by a deputy manager who we met during our visit. She has a care qualification and is working towards a management qualification. An external senior person undertakes quality monitoring visits and the home do not know that he is visiting. We sampled the report of the visit undertaken in March 2009 and saw evidence that actions had been taken to address any issues raised. It is recommended that these visits are undertaken at times that people living there are at home so that they have the opportunity to discuss their views about the service provided there. Due to being a new service, the quality monitoring systems in place at the home are being developed. A care audit had recently been undertaken in order to assess the standard of care provided, so that actions can be taken to address any issues raised. This report has identified some of the ways that the views of people are sought such as group meetings, people’s involvement in the recruitment of staff and their inclusion in training. We were told that questionnaires had recently been distributed to health and social care professionals, families and friends of people living there in order to find out what they think about the home and how they can improve. Prior to the inspection, the registered manager had completed an Annual Quality Assurance Assessment (AQAA), and returned it to us. This included comprehensive details about the home, staff and people who live there and what the new service hoped to achieve for the benefit of the people living there. Health and safety and maintenance records were sampled. A number of checks are made by staff and actions are taken to make sure that peoples’ health and safety is maintained. Records showed that the fire alarm system had been regularly tested and serviced to make sure that it was working properly. There are a number of risk assessments in place to ensure that the environment and equipment is safe. We saw that actions had been taken to rectify any hazards identified. There have not been any accidents involving people living at the home. Glynn House DS0000072913.V374426.R01.S.doc Version 5.2 Page 28 Glynn House DS0000072913.V374426.R01.S.doc Version 5.2 Page 29 SCORING OF OUTCOMES This page summarises the assessment of the extent to which the National Minimum Standards for Care Homes for Adults 18-65 have been met and uses the following scale. The scale ranges from: 4 Standard Exceeded 2 Standard Almost Met (Commendable) (Minor Shortfalls) 3 Standard Met 1 Standard Not Met (No Shortfalls) (Major Shortfalls) “X” in the standard met box denotes standard not assessed on this occasion “N/A” in the standard met box denotes standard not applicable CHOICE OF HOME Standard No Score 1 2 2 3 3 X 4 3 5 X INDIVIDUAL NEEDS AND CHOICES Standard No 6 7 8 9 10 Score CONCERNS AND COMPLAINTS Standard No Score 22 3 23 3 ENVIRONMENT Standard No Score 24 3 25 3 26 3 27 3 28 3 29 X 30 3 STAFFING Standard No Score 31 X 32 3 33 3 34 3 35 3 36 X CONDUCT AND MANAGEMENT OF THE HOME Standard No 37 38 39 40 41 42 43 Score 3 3 3 3 X LIFESTYLES Standard No Score 11 3 12 3 13 3 14 3 15 3 16 3 17 3 PERSONAL AND HEALTHCARE SUPPORT Standard No 18 19 20 21 Score 3 2 2 X 3 X 2 X X 3 X Glynn House DS0000072913.V374426.R01.S.doc Version 5.2 Page 30 N/A Are there any outstanding requirements from the last inspection? STATUTORY REQUIREMENTS This section sets out the actions, which must be taken so that the registered person/s meets the Care Standards Act 2000, Care Homes Regulations 2001 and the National Minimum Standards. The Registered Provider(s) must comply with the given timescales. No. Standard Regulation Requirement Timescale for action RECOMMENDATIONS These recommendations relate to National Minimum Standards and are seen as good practice for the Registered Provider/s to consider carrying out. No. 1 2 3 4 Refer to Standard YA1 YA19 YA20 YA39 Good Practice Recommendations Fee rates should be included in information about the home so that people know how much it would cost to live there. Health plans should be developed so that peoples’ conditions are monitored to find out if treatments are effective. Systems in place for the management of medication should be reviewed in order to assess whether people have received their medication as prescribed. Arrangements in place for quality monitoring visits should include the views of people living at the home. Glynn House DS0000072913.V374426.R01.S.doc Version 5.2 Page 31 Commission for Social Care Inspection West Midlands West Midlands Regional Contact Team 3rd Floor 77 Paradise Circus Queensway Birmingham, B1 2DT National Enquiry Line: Telephone: 0845 015 0120 or 0191 233 3323 Textphone: 0845 015 2255 or 0191 233 3588 Email: enquiries@csci.gsi.gov.uk Web: www.csci.org.uk © This report is copyright Commission for Social Care Inspection (CSCI) and may only be used in its entirety. Extracts may not be used or reproduced without the express permission of CSCI Glynn House DS0000072913.V374426.R01.S.doc Version 5.2 Page 32 - Please note that this information is included on www.bestcarehome.co.uk under license from the regulator. Re-publishing this information is in breach of the terms of use of that website. 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