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Care Home: Longueville Court

  • Village Green Orton Longueville Peterborough PE2 7DN
  • Tel: 01733230709
  • Fax: 01733230716

Longueville Court was opened in 1995 as a modern, purpose-built, spacious care home on two floors, providing nursing and personal care for up to 105 people over the age of 65 years. The registration was varied in November 2004 for the home to provide care for up to 24 persons with physical disabilities in a dedicated unit within the home. Longueville Court is owned by Barchester Healthcare Homes Limited and is situated overlooking the quiet village green of Orton Longueville, approximately two miles from the centre of Peterborough. The building is a country house style, built on two levels and divided into four units. Memory Lane and Robin unit are on the ground floor and Skylark and Kingfisher units are on the first floor. Memory Lane provides care to elderly people who have dementia related care needs. Robin provides care to people who have physical disabilities, whilst Skylark and Kingfisher provide nursing care. Longueville Court provides en-suite facilities in all rooms except one. The building has an atmosphere of spaciousness and comfort. The company claim, `to have created places that are not at all clinical or institutionalised`, in their `Welcome to Barchester Healthcare` pamphlet. The home has attractive and secure inner courtyard garden and a sensory garden. CQC inspection reports are available from the CQC website and a copy is available to read at the home. Fees charged range from £789 to £1150 per week. 1 3 0 4 2 0 1 0

  • Latitude: 52.553001403809
    Longitude: -0.27700001001358
  • Manager: Miss Kerry Susan Charlotte Elliott
  • Price p/w: £970
  • UK
  • Total Capacity: 105
  • Type: Care home with nursing
  • Provider: Barchester Healthcare Homes Ltd
  • Ownership: Private
  • Care Home ID: 9962
Residents Needs:
Dementia, Dementia, Physical disability, Physical disability, Old age, not falling within any other category, Terminally ill

Previous Inspections

This may not be the latest inspection for this service as we are having techinical problems updating from CQC - please check directly on the regulators website for the most recent report; bestcarehome hopes to be back to regular updates shortly.

For extracts, read the latest CQC inspection for Longueville Court.

Random inspection report Care homes for older people Name: Address: Longueville Court Village Green Orton Longueville Peterborough PE2 7DN two star good service 13/04/2010 The quality rating for this care home is: The rating was made on: A quality rating is our assessment of how well a care home, agency or scheme is meeting the needs of the people who use it. We give a quality rating following a full review of the service. We call this review a ‘key’ inspection. This is a report of a random inspection of this care home. A random inspection is a short, focussed review of the service. Details of how to get other inspection reports for this care home, including the last key inspection report, can be found on the last page of this report. Lead inspector: Don Traylen Date: 0 2 0 9 2 0 1 0 Information about the care home Name of care home: Address: Longueville Court Village Green Orton Longueville Peterborough PE2 7DN 01733230709 01733230716 Kerry.elliot@barchester.com www.barchester.com/oulton Telephone number: Fax number: Email address: Provider web address: Name of registered provider(s): Name of registered manager (if applicable) Miss Kerry Susan Charlotte Elliott Type of registration: Number of places registered: Conditions of registration: Category(ies) : Barchester Healthcare Homes Ltd care home 105 Number of places (if applicable): Under 65 Over 65 0 0 39 101 1 0 101 dementia dementia dementia old age, not falling within any other category physical disability physical disability terminally ill Conditions of registration: 1 1 0 0 0 24 0 1 (one) named male over the age of 65 years with Physical Disabilities Dementia (DE) 1 - The one place for one person under 65 years is for a named individual only Care Homes for Older People Page 2 of 13 Dementia DE = 1 female, is for a named person for the duration of their residency only Date of last inspection Brief description of the care home Longueville Court was opened in 1995 as a modern, purpose-built, spacious care home on two floors, providing nursing and personal care for up to 105 people over the age of 65 years. The registration was varied in November 2004 for the home to provide care for up to 24 persons with physical disabilities in a dedicated unit within the home. Longueville Court is owned by Barchester Healthcare Homes Limited and is situated overlooking the quiet village green of Orton Longueville, approximately two miles from the centre of Peterborough. The building is a country house style, built on two levels and divided into four units. Memory Lane and Robin unit are on the ground floor and Skylark and Kingfisher units are on the first floor. Memory Lane provides care to elderly people who have dementia related care needs. Robin provides care to people who have physical disabilities, whilst Skylark and Kingfisher provide nursing care. Longueville Court provides en-suite facilities in all rooms except one. The building has an atmosphere of spaciousness and comfort. The company claim, to have created places that are not at all clinical or institutionalised, in their Welcome to Barchester Healthcare pamphlet. The home has attractive and secure inner courtyard garden and a sensory garden. CQC inspection reports are available from the CQC website and a copy is available to read at the home. Fees charged range from £789 to £1150 per week. 1 3 0 4 2 0 1 0 Care Homes for Older People Page 3 of 13 What we found: Two inspectors carried out this Random inspection on 02/09/2010 in response to recent concerns and allegations made known to the Commission. We started at 09.55 am and finished at 16:00pm. We assessed the written care plans and the associated records of care for two people, one of whom was resident in Memory Lane, the dementia care unit of the home whilst the other person was resident in the part of the home for people who have a physical disability. Both people had high dependency needs. The plans were neat and orderly and presented in protective covers. Each care plan contained photographs of the person, details of next of kin, admission assessments, a medical summary and brief social history. The different elements of care were described and the actions to meet the identified needs were clear and extensively detailed. There were clear plans for personal care and hygiene and for moving and handling. Daily Progress and Evaluation notes had been maintained. Both plans had been recorded as having been reviewed monthly in the Care Plan Evaluation form. In one persons Care Profile Review, recorded by the home, there were three dates shown and a note that a relative had been invited to attend a review, although there was no information about the review, or if it had taken place, or of any resulting actions. There were risk assessments for some aspects of care in each persons plan. We spoke to one of the above two people, who receives a significant amount of care whilst in bed. They indicated to us they were content and comfortable. We observed this person was clean and appeared to be well cared for. Their care plan showed the wrong person as their next-of kin, which was relevant because their contract had recently been terminated by the home. The care plan showed this persons needs were high and more than two care assistants were needed at certain times to provide care. They were at risk because of weakened skin integrity and was rated as a high risk on the Waterlow scale used to assess the condition and risk of pressure sores to the skin. There were charts kept in the room indicating when repositioning to relieve pressure had taken place; another when checked during the night for sleep pattern and another chart when prescribed skin creams had been applied. These charts had been recorded on a daily basis, although it was not shown to what part of the body, or why cream had been applied. The written care plan did indicate where the cream was to be applied, although the record did not demonstrate if this had been followed or if any other treatment was being provided. We looked at the records kept of body maps to indicate whether any marks or injuries had been acquired. The records had been completed on a daily basis and showed that they were used to record new signs and markings. It was not certain how staff would recognise or know whether any mark was new, or recent, or had already been noticed and recorded. We found that some specific marks had not been recorded. There were written instructions in the care plan numbered 2a, for a trained nurse to observe and monitor daily the state of (a named body part) and to document in progress notes, but there were no instructions on what to look for, or what to record. Staff had recorded daily that they had not carried out a specified named activity relevant to this aspect of care, but had not recorded what was observed or should have been monitored. The unit manager informed us that a haemorrhage had once caused a bruising appearance, but this had not been recorded on the body map. Whilst the records of body maps were completed daily, they did not provide a daily description or picture, because the daily Care Homes for Older People Page 4 of 13 description of that persons body had not been recorded in full and only new injuries were reported and not the existing or healing injuries. We saw documents titled, Wound Assessment and Wound Care Evaluation and these had not been used in this persons record, to indicate if any clinical treatment had been provided, or of the progress of the injuries indicated on the body maps. The above missing information, on this persons body map charts and the treatment and healing progress should have been recorded and charted on the Wound Assessment and Wound Care Evaluation forms as a responsive safeguarding action to account for all injuries and possible harm and of attention and treatment provided. This persons care plan had recorded the times when seen by a GP and it was evident that a GP had attended and was available for the home to consult should they have concerns about their health. We looked at another persons care plan. We found their plan had not changed over the last 4 months and had been reviewed monthly. The plan was comprehensive and contained extensive and comprehensive details of how to meet this persons high dependency needs. A recent incident indicated that the care plan should have been amended to record the homes response and care arrangements in relation to this. It also appeared that alternative or additional methods of communication at night time could have been in place. Night time checks had been recorded on an hourly basis, as they had for everybody living on that unit, although they lacked detail of what was checked and how they had been conducted. There was no written care plan to inform staff that night time checks should be carried out or how they should be conducted. The monitoring would have been carried out differently than for other people, but had been recorded in the same brief way as that for all other people. As this persons communication was further compromised at night time, it was judged that a specific and explicit plan for this need should have been written. Safeguarding: There was not a specific safeguarding plan to indicate what protective measures were in place to safeguard two people who had been the subjects of harm. One care worker and three unit managers informed us of the protection that was in place, but this had not been written as a specific element of their care in their care plans. We discussed with one of the unit managers that they should improve some aspects of their recordings of care monitoring and care provision, so that records are precise and accurate and must be designed to safeguard people and to ensure a person is being monitored for their safety. When we spoke to care staff and to three nurse managers on two of the homes units they each told us the action they should take if an allegation of abuse were known to them. Staff and managers told us that each unit within the home is expected to refer to the Local Authority (LA) Safeguarding Team and they have the contact details to do this. We saw that a copy of the homes Safeguarding policy was kept on each of the two units we visited. The home had maintained clear and complete records of all allegations known to them and of the subsequent investigations that were undertaken. A recent allegation of abuse that was reported by the home after being brought to their attention by a resident. However, the referral to the Local Authority Safeguarding Team was not made until two days afterward. We were given a copy of the homes Safeguarding policy. Overall, the safeguarding policy Care Homes for Older People Page 5 of 13 was weak. The outcome of the policy was stated as, the residents rights of privacy and dignity are met at all times. The policy did not clarify whether the home is committed to protecting and ensuring vulnerable people will be protected from harm. Section 1.14 stated, Protecting residents from harm by others should not be routine policy... It did not refer to the reporting procedure, or to any urgency or timescale to report abuse, although it did state that the home must abide by the advice of the Local Authority Protection team (S1.20). Section 1.3 of the policy was ambiguously written. The policy also referred to the preceding Commission for regulating providers of social care and to the previous POVA Safeguarding Vulnerable Adults team, rather than SOVA Safeguarding (S1.15). The policy was dated September 2007. The manager informed us that the organisation is currently reviewing this document when we brought these matters to their attention. Staffing: In the specialist dementia care unit there were 21 people resident there on the day of inspection. There were two nurses and four care assistants looking after them. There were arrangements to provide one-to-one care for two people for 6 hours during the afternoon and evening. We were informed by the unit manager and given details of fifteen people receiving continuing care funding and twelve people who frequently require more than one care assistant to help them with their personal care. At 10 am we observed several people requiring assistance to eat and waiting for their breakfast. Two of the care assistants were carrying out kitchen tasks to prepare their breakfast whilst two other staff were assisting people in their rooms. We were told by staff that the doors into the lounge were closed to prevent people from going into the lounge whilst the breakfast was being served. Between 12.30 and 1.30 we observed that two care assistants were carrying out kitchen tasks of serving food from a hot store, as well as encouraging or assisting people to eat. The staff roster showed that two nurses and four care staff and two further staff providing 6 hours each of one to one care, were the regular pattern of care workers in that unit. Management: Staff informed us that the morale among them was strong and that they felt the home was being managed well. They told us they were pleased with the current day to day management of the home. They considered they could communicate readily and the manager was approachable if they had a matter they wanted to discuss. Staff meetings and resident and relative meetings are regularly arranged. The recent termination of a contract by the home showed they had written and informed the commissioning authority and had given verbal information to the next of kin. They had not confirmed this in writing to the next of kin, or to the person resident at the home. The manager assured us that they would immediately put this in writing to both people when we made her aware of this. Regulation 37 reports had been made regularly and appropriately by the home and have been sent to the Commission. What the care home does well: There were many aspects of the care plans that were good. The written plans were easily Care Homes for Older People Page 6 of 13 available in each unit for staff to access. They were written so that staff could follow instructions and were clear and ordered and well maintained working documents. Staff had acted and carried out their tasks appropriately and the records they had kept told us that staff had provided regular and attentive care and had not been neglectful in their care or attitude. Whilst the records and actions for monitoring people, their written care plans and the planned responses to allegations of harm can be improved, as expected by the requirements written in this report, we did not see any evidence of poor outcomes. We spoke to two relatives who were frequent visitors to the home. They told us that their relative was very well cared for and that they felt they were invited to be part of the care arrangements. They had read their relatives care plan and had been asked for their views and thoughts about the care. They confirmed they had been informed when anything significant had affected their relative. They also told us they had attended relatives meetings at the home. We met and spoke to a GP whom the home has arranged to visit and hold surgery at the home over two days a week. The GP informed us that he was aware of the needs of one person whose care we had assessed and that he confirmed that he had seen this person on several occasions. Comprehensive records were maintained for each safeguarding referral or case known by the home. The home has co-operated with the Local Authority Safeguarding team whenever necessary. Staff were informative and demonstrated they knew the care arrangements of certain people when we asked them. They were clear about their duties to report any allegation of abuse and told us that they would report abuse without delay. Staff knew they could independently report abuse directly to the Local Authority safeguarding team and they showed us where the contact details for reporting were kept. Staff informed us that their morale was strong and they felt the home was being managed well. They told us they were pleased with the current day to day management of the home. They considered they could communicate readily with the manager if they wanted to. Staff meetings and resident and relative meetings are regular events. We saw that there were arrangements listed in the reception area of the four activities the home was arranging on the day of inspection. These included word games and card games, a quiz and manicures. Regulation 37 reports had been made regularly and appropriately by the home and have been sent to the Commission. What they could do better: Care plans records must be improved so that it is clear when and what has been reviewed and who participated. Changes to care plans must be explicit. Specific attention to the personal care that is designed to safeguard people and carried out as routine monitoring for any physical injury or marks, should be suitably recorded. If body maps are used by the home for this purpose they should be descriptive and give a clear indication of what the persons appearance or condition is, at each and every time they are monitored. Care plans should include a suitable detailed plan, written as a response to protect the person, when that person is known to have been at risk of abuse, or has suffered abuse. Care Homes for Older People Page 7 of 13 The home must ensure that any allegation of abuse known to them is reported immediately to the Local Authority Safeguarding team. The homes safeguarding policy must indicate the above action. It is required that the policy for safeguarding/Protecting people from abuse is reviewed in light of the findings in this report. The staffing numbers should be kept under review to ensure that people in the Memory Lane unit are not restricted in their activity and that there are always sufficient numbers of care workers to ensure people are not left waiting for their meals. The home should develop a staffing analysis guide, or system related to the dependency levels of peoples needs, so that there is evidence to determine the numbers of staff working at any one time. When the home issues a notice of termination of a contract for accommodation and care, they must comply with the requirements of the Care Homes Regulations 2001, Regulation 40 and inform the next of kin and the person accommodated, as well as the commissioning authority, or person acting with a Power of Attorney for their financial matters if paying for their care privately. If you want to know what action the person responsible for this care home is taking following this report, you can contact them using the details set out on page 2. Care Homes for Older People Page 8 of 13 Are there any outstanding requirements from the last inspection? Yes £ No R Outstanding statutory requirements These are requirements that were set at the previous inspection, but have still not been met. They say what the registered person had to do to meet the Care Standards Act 2000, Regulations 2001 and the National Minimum Standards. No. Standard Regulation Requirement Timescale for action Care Homes for Older People Page 9 of 13 Requirements and recommendations from this inspection: Immediate requirements: These are immediate requirements that were set on the day we visited this care home. The registered person had to meet these within 48 hours. No. Standard Regulation Requirement Timescale for action Statutory requirements These requirements set out what the registered person must do to meet the Care Standards Act 2000, Regulations 2001 and the National Minimum Standards. The registered person(s) must do this within the timescales we have set. No. Standard Regulation Requirement Timescale for action 1 7 13 Care plans must include a 20/09/2010 suitably detailed plan, written as a response to protect the person, when that person is known to have been at risk of abuse, or has suffered abuse. So that people know there is a plan to protect them from harm. 2 7 15 Care plans must include the detail of the monitoring that is being undertaken to ensure that people are safe. So that there is a detailed and timely record of any injury or wound or what is observed, or found when there is a monitoring arrangement in place designed to ensure people are safe. 24/09/2010 3 7 15 Care plans must be kept under review and must contain the most current care arrangements. 24/09/2010 Care Homes for Older People Page 10 of 13 Statutory requirements These requirements set out what the registered person must do to meet the Care Standards Act 2000, Regulations 2001 and the National Minimum Standards. The registered person(s) must do this within the timescales we have set. No. Standard Regulation Requirement Timescale for action So that peoples care plans are an accurate description of all their care arrangements. 4 18 13 Any allegations of abuse 09/09/2010 known to the home must be immediately referred to the Local Authority Safeguarding Team. So that people will be given immediate protection from harm. 5 18 13 The Safeguarding of Vulnerable Adults from Abuse policy must be reviewed. So that people have a suitable and satisfactory written policy to inform them they will be protected from abuse and the policy makes clear the homes objectives and attitude to abuse and to the timescales for reporting abuse. 6 37 40 When a contract for accommodation and care is terminated by the home, each of the relevant people must be informed in writing. So that the relevant people are informed and the home has a record of this action. 10/09/2010 20/09/2010 Care Homes for Older People Page 11 of 13 Recommendations These recommendations are taken from the best practice described in the National Minimum Standards and the registered person(s) should consider them as a way of improving their service. No Refer to Standard Good Practice Recommendations 1 27 Staffing levels in the Memory Lane unit should be kept under review, to ensure the needs of the people living there are met. Care Homes for Older People Page 12 of 13 Reader Information Document Purpose: Author: Audience: Further copies from: Inspection Report Care Quality Commission General Public 0870 240 7535 (telephone order line) Our duty to regulate social care services is set out in the Care Standards Act 2000. Copies of the National Minimum Standards –Care Homes for Older People can be found at www.dh.gov.uk or got from The Stationery Office (TSO) PO Box 29, St Crispins, Duke Street, Norwich, NR3 1GN. Tel: 0870 600 5522. Online ordering from the Stationery Office is also available: www.tso.co.uk/bookshop Helpline: Telephone: 03000 616161 Email: enquiries@cqc.org.uk Web: www.cqc.org.uk We want people to be able to access this information. If you would like a summary in a different format or language please contact our helpline or go to our website. © Care Quality Commission 2010 This publication may be reproduced in whole or in part in any format or medium for noncommercial purposes, provided that it is reproduced accurately and not used in a derogatory manner or in a misleading context. The source should be acknowledged, by showing the publication title and © Care Quality Commission 2010. Care Homes for Older People Page 13 of 13 - Please note that this information is included on www.bestcarehome.co.uk under license from the regulator. Re-publishing this information is in breach of the terms of use of that website. Discrete codes and changes have been inserted throughout the textual data shown on the site that will provide incontrovertable proof of copying in the event this information is re-published on other websites. 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