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Care Home: Myford House Nursing And Residential Home

  • Woodlands Lane Horsehay Telford Shropshire TF4 3QF
  • Tel: 01952503286
  • Fax: 01952504966

Myford House is a care home for older people, registered to provide both personal and nursing care for up to 40 people and offers both single and double bedroom accommodation. All three floors are accessible via a passenger lift. An extension to the home is currently being built. 4102008 The home overlooks open countryside and is situated on the edge of Lightmoor village on the outskirts of Telford and is easily accessible either by public transport or by car. A small car park is at the front of the home and there is level access to the reception area. People who use the service and their representatives are able to gain information about Myford House from the Statement of Purpose and Service User Guide, including information on the fees charged which are currently noted as varying from 348 to 575 pounds per week, dependant on social and nursing needs and whether the room chosen is a single or shared room. Inspection reports produced by CQC can be obtained direct from the home or are available from our webiste at www.cqc.org.uk. Our last key inspection of Myford House was undertaken on 14th October 2008.

  • Latitude: 52.65299987793
    Longitude: -2.489000082016
  • Manager: Mrs Lisa Jacqueline Hatch
  • Price p/w: £462
  • UK
  • Total Capacity: 57
  • Type: Care home with nursing
  • Provider: Redwood Care Homes Ltd
  • Ownership: Private
  • Care Home ID: 11047
Residents Needs:
Dementia, Old age, not falling within any other category

Previous Inspections

This may not be the latest inspection for this service as we are having techinical problems updating from CQC - please check directly on the regulators website for the most recent report; bestcarehome hopes to be back to regular updates shortly.

For extracts, read the latest CQC inspection for Myford House Nursing And Residential Home.

Key inspection report Care homes for older people Name: Address: Myford House Nursing And Residential Home Woodlands Lane Horsehay Telford Shropshire TF4 3QF     The quality rating for this care home is:   two star good service A quality rating is our assessment of how well a care home is meeting the needs of the people who use it. We give a quality rating following a full review of the service. We call this full review a ‘key’ inspection. Lead inspector: Rosalind Dennis     Date: 0 2 1 2 2 0 0 9 This is a review of quality of outcomes that people experience in this care home. We believe high quality care should • • • • • Be safe Have the right outcomes, including clinical outcomes Be a good experience for the people that use it Help prevent illness, and promote healthy, independent living Be available to those who need it when they need it. The first part of the review gives the overall quality rating for the care home: • • • • 3 2 1 0 stars - excellent stars - good star - adequate star - poor There is also a bar chart that gives a quick way of seeing the quality of care that the home provides under key areas that matter to people. There is a summary of what we think this service does well, what they have improved on and, where it applies, what they need to do better. We use the national minimum standards to describe the outcomes that people should experience. National minimum standards are written by the Department of Health for each type of care service. After the summary there is more detail about our findings. The following table explains what you will see under each outcome area. Outcome area (for example Choice of home) These are the outcomes that people staying in care homes should experience. that people have said are important to them: They reflect the things This box tells you the outcomes that we will always inspect against when we do a key inspection. This box tells you any additional outcomes that we may inspect against when we do a key inspection. This is what people staying in this care home experience: Judgement: This box tells you our opinion of what we have looked at in this outcome area. We will say whether it is excellent, good, adequate or poor. Evidence: This box describes the information we used to come to our judgement. Care Homes for Older People Page 2 of 26 We review the quality of the service against outcomes from the National Minimum Standards (NMS). Those standards are written by the Department of Health for each type of care service. Copies of the National Minimum Standards – Care Homes for Older People can be found at www.dh.gov.uk or bought from The Stationery Office (TSO) PO Box 29, St Crispins, Duke Street, Norwich, NR3 1GN. Tel: 0870 600 5522. Online ordering from the Stationery Office is also available: www.tso.co.uk/bookshop The mission of the Care Quality Commission is to make care better for people by: • Regulating health and adult social care services to ensure quality and safety standards, drive improvement and stamp out bad practice • Protecting the rights of people who use services, particularly the most vulnerable and those detained under the Mental Health Act 1983 • Providing accessible, trustworthy information on the quality of care and services so people can make better decisions about their care and so that commissioners and providers of services can improve services. • Providing independent public accountability on how commissioners and providers of services are improving the quality of care and providing value for money. Reader Information Document Purpose Author Audience Further copies from Copyright Inspection report Care Quality Commission General public 0870 240 7535 (telephone order line) Copyright © (2009) Care Quality Commission (CQC). This publication may be reproduced in whole or in part, free of charge, in any format or medium provided that it is not used for commercial gain. This consent is subject to the material being reproduced accurately and on proviso that it is not used in a derogatory manner or misleading context. The material should be acknowledged as CQC copyright, with the title and date of publication of the document specified. www.cqc.org.uk Internet address Care Homes for Older People Page 3 of 26 Information about the care home Name of care home: Address: Myford House Nursing And Residential Home Woodlands Lane Horsehay Telford Shropshire TF4 3QF 01952503286 01952504966 Telephone number: Fax number: Email address: Provider web address: Name of registered provider(s): Redwood Care Homes Ltd Name of registered manager (if applicable) Mrs Lisa Jacqueline Hatch Type of registration: Number of places registered: care home 40 Conditions of registration: Category(ies) : Number of places (if applicable): Under 65 old age, not falling within any other category Additional conditions: The maximum number of service users who can be accommodated is: 40 The registered person may provide the following category of service only: Care Home with Nursing (Code N); To service users of the following gender: Either; Whose primary care needs on admission to the home are within the following categories: Old age, not falling within any other category (OP) 40 Date of last inspection Brief description of the care home Myford House is a care home for older people, registered to provide both personal and nursing care for up to 40 people and offers both single and double bedroom accommodation. All three floors are accessible via a passenger lift. An extension to the home is currently being built. Care Homes for Older People Page 4 of 26 Over 65 40 0 1 4 1 0 2 0 0 8 Brief description of the care home The home overlooks open countryside and is situated on the edge of Lightmoor village on the outskirts of Telford and is easily accessible either by public transport or by car. A small car park is at the front of the home and there is level access to the reception area. People who use the service and their representatives are able to gain information about Myford House from the Statement of Purpose and Service User Guide, including information on the fees charged which are currently noted as varying from 348 to 575 pounds per week, dependant on social and nursing needs and whether the room chosen is a single or shared room. Inspection reports produced by CQC can be obtained direct from the home or are available from our webiste at www.cqc.org.uk. Our last key inspection of Myford House was undertaken on 14th October 2008. Care Homes for Older People Page 5 of 26 Summary This is an overview of what we found during the inspection. The quality rating for this care home is: Our judgement for each outcome: two star good service Choice of home Health and personal care Daily life and social activities Complaints and protection Environment Staffing Management and administration peterchart Poor Adequate Good Excellent How we did our inspection: This inspection was carried out over one day by one inspector. The home did not know we were going to visit. The focus of inspections we, the Commission, undertake is upon outcomes for people who live in the home and their views of the service provided. This process considers the care homes capacity to meet regulatory requirements, standards of practice and focuses on aspects of service provision that need further development. Prior to the visit taking place we looked at all the information that we have received, or asked for, since the last key inspection. This included notifications received from the home. These are reports about things that have happened in the home that they have to let us know about by law, and an Annual Quality Assurance Assessment (AQAA). This is a document that provides information about the home and how they think it meets the needs of people living there. Four people living in different areas of the home were case tracked in detail. This involves establishing individuals experiences of living in the care home by meeting Care Homes for Older People Page 6 of 26 them, observing the care and support they receive, discussing their care with staff, looking at care files, and focusing on outcomes. Tracking peoples care helps us understand the experiences of people who use the service. Three people who we case tracked were able to tell us about their day to day life at the home and the support they receive from staff. Another person was not able to give us lots of information but was able to indicate they are satisfied with the home. We spoke with other people who were able to tell us they are satisfied with their care and feel safe. We also looked at feedback given by 10 people and 10 staff when they completed surveys for us and spoke with people visiting the home during the inspection. We looked around some areas of the home and observed a sample of care, staff and health and safety records. We spoke with staff during the inspection to establish their views of working at the home and if anything needs to be improved. The new manager, Ms Lisa Hatch and a representative of the company were present during the inspection and provided their assistance during the inspection. They were present when we provided feedback at the end of the inspection. Care Homes for Older People Page 7 of 26 What the care home does well: What has improved since the last inspection? What they could do better: If you want to know what action the person responsible for this care home is taking following this report, you can contact them using the details on page 4. The report of this inspection is available from our website www.cqc.org.uk. You can get printed copies from enquiries@cqc.org.uk or by telephoning our order line 0870 240 7535. Care Homes for Older People Page 8 of 26 Details of our findings Contents Choice of home (standards 1 - 6) Health and personal care (standards 7 - 11) Daily life and social activities (standards 12 - 15) Complaints and protection (standards 16 - 18) Environment (standards 19 - 26) Staffing (standards 27 - 30) Management and administration (standards 31 - 38) Outstanding statutory requirements Requirements and recommendations from this inspection Care Homes for Older People Page 9 of 26 Choice of home These are the outcomes that people staying in care homes should experience. They reflect the things that people have said are important to them: People are confident that the care home can support them. This is because there is an accurate assessment of their needs that they, or people close to them, have been involved in. This tells the home all about them and the support they need. People who stay at the home only for intermediate care, have a clear assessment that includes a plan on what they hope for and want to achieve when they return home. People can decide whether the care home can meet their support and accommodation needs. This is because they, or people close to them, have been able to visit the home and have got full, clear, accurate and up to date information about the home. If they decide to stay in the home they know about their rights and responsibilities because there is an easy to understand contract or statement of terms and conditions between them and the care home that includes how much they will pay and what the home provides for the money. This is what people staying in this care home experience: Judgement: People using this service experience good quality outcomes in this area. We have made this judgement using a range of evidence, including a visit to this service. People have their needs assessed before they move in, which ensures that people are only admitted if the service is confident it can meet their needs. Evidence: We looked at the care records for two people who have moved to Myford House since the last key inspection. A representative from the home had fully assessed their needs by meeting them in hospital before they were admitted and seeking information about their illness and care needs. This helps to ensure that only people whose needs can be met at Myford House are admitted. The information from the initial assessment had been used to draw up care plans with the person and their representative. This helps staff to know how to give care based on the persons needs and wishes. We also saw that when a person had gone to hospital from the home staff contacted the hospital to find out if there had been a change in this persons needs before they returned to Myford House. This is good Care Homes for Older People Page 10 of 26 Evidence: practice as it enables staff to plan for the persons return to the home. We looked at the service user guide, which contains a good level of information about the home, so that people know what the service provides. Included within the guide is information on the fees charged by the home and what is included within the fee. The home does not provide intermediate care, a form of intensive rehabilitation, but does provide care to people who need support whilst recovering after illness or an operation. The home also provides short term and respite care. Care Homes for Older People Page 11 of 26 Health and personal care These are the outcomes that people staying in care homes should experience. They reflect the things that people have said are important to them: People’s health, personal and social care needs are met. The home has a plan of care that the person, or someone close to them, has been involved in making. If they take medicine, they manage it themselves if they can. If they cannot manage their medicine, the care home supports them with it, in a safe way. People’s right to privacy is respected and the support they get from staff is given in a way that maintains their dignity. If people are approaching the end of their life, the care home will respect their choices and help them feel comfortable and secure. They, and people close to them, are reassured that their death will be handled with sensitivity, dignity and respect, and take account of their spiritual and cultural wishes. This is what people staying in this care home experience: Judgement: People using this service experience good quality outcomes in this area. We have made this judgement using a range of evidence, including a visit to this service. People receive support and care in the way they prefer and need. Their health needs are met and their dignity is respected by the staff involved in their care. Evidence: People we spoke with gave very positive feedback about how they are cared for and viewed their needs are met at the home. We observed staff interacting well with people, providing guidance and help when needed. Throughout our inspection people appeared content and well looked after. We looked at the care files for the people we case tracked which shows people have detailed care plans and risk assessments in place. This means staff have information on how people prefer to have their needs met taking into account any risks to them. We observed that, for people assessed as being at risk of developing pressure sores they had specific mattresses on their beds and cushions on their chairs, which are designed to reduce the risk of pressure sores occurring and care plans described clearly what staff need to do. We saw that staff followed the plan, assisting people to Care Homes for Older People Page 12 of 26 Evidence: stand and move at regular intervals. Peoples care records described the equipment and techniques needed by staff to move them safely. We later saw staff using the equipment safely and as described in the care plan. Staff had good approaches with people, providing reassurance and explanation when using the equipment and maintaining peoples dignity. Two people who currently have wounds, had documentation in their file showing the care needed of the wounds to promote healing, including the type of wound dressing and how often it needs to be changed. The wound had been checked and measured on a frequent basis so that staff could determine if the wound was healing. We saw from looking at care records that the home contacts healthcare professionals, such as GPs promptly when there are concerns about the health and well being of people. At the last inspection it was found that there was little evidence in care plans to show that care plans had been drawn up with people and their representatives and care plans did not contain sufficient detail about the care being given. This inspection finds improvement and the company representative and manager described how they propose to continue developing the care planning process. Four care staff we spoke with described how they look at peoples care plans so they know the care that is needed and that they are involved in updating information in care records as well as the nursing staff, which helps to ensure information in care records is current and up to date. Three visitors we spoke with confirmed staff keep them informed of any changes to their relatives condition and are very pleased with all aspects of the home and the care given to their relatives. We looked at the medication records for the people we case tracked and saw these records were up to date and properly completed. Medication is stored in locked trolleys and a locked cupboard so that people are not at risk of taking medication they are not prescribed. We saw written records showing that staff monitor the temperature of the medication fridge and the temperature of the room where medication is stored. We noticed that there have been occasions when the fridge temperature has been too low and the manager assured us that action would be taken quickly to rectify that. Care Homes for Older People Page 13 of 26 Daily life and social activities These are the outcomes that people staying in care homes should experience. They reflect the things that people have said are important to them: Each person is treated as an individual and the care home is responsive to his or her race, culture, religion, age, disability, gender and sexual orientation. They are part of their local community. The care home supports people to follow personal interests and activities. People are able to keep in touch with family, friends and representatives. They are as independent as they can be, lead their chosen lifestyle and have the opportunity to make the most of their abilities. People have nutritious and attractive meals and snacks, at a time and place to suit them. There are no additional outcomes. This is what people staying in this care home experience: Judgement: People using this service experience good quality outcomes in this area. We have made this judgement using a range of evidence, including a visit to this service. People are able to take part in activities and events which meet their needs, capabilities and preferences. People are offered a choice of meals to meet their dietary needs and preferences. Evidence: Five people we spoke with described how staff respect the choices they make and how they like to spend their day. For example, one person described how staff support her with choosing the clothing she wants to wear each day. Another person described how they like to stay in bed until late morning and staff respect this. Staff could describe peoples likes, dislikes and preferences and this reflected with what people told us and what was written in their care plan. On arrival at the home we found there to be a buzz of activity in the lounge with preparations for Christmas in place. During the afternoon of the inspection a brass band from a local school came to play carols at the home, which people and their visitors appeared to enjoy. A notice board in the reception shows a good range of forthcoming events and visits by outside entertainers. The home employs a member of staff as an activities co-ordinator to organise, plan Care Homes for Older People Page 14 of 26 Evidence: and provide activities. The member of staff demonstrates an enthusiasm to ensure people have activities to take part in if they choose. We saw written records, which shows how the home seeks information about peoples hobbies and lifestyles before they came to live at Myford House. The activities co-ordinator described how they try and use this information to plan activities appropriate for the persons current care needs. Each person has an activities record, detailing the activities they have participated in. This shows that a range of activities are provided, which may be as part of a group or on a one-to-one basis, for example fish and chip suppers, music, dominoes, leg and hand exercises, quizzes, watching films. The activities co-ordinator described how people who may be unwell or who are cared for in bed are still provided with opportunities to enhance their well-being such as through hand massage, reflecting on past events, singing, or by staff reading novels to them. A notice board shows forthcoming events and visits by outside entertainers and the home also produces a newsletter to keep people informed. People who were able to give us their views, told us of their satisfaction with the meals and confirmed they are offered a choice of what they want to eat. We observed staff using good approaches with people who need help with eating and drinking and staff were observed providing people with regular drinks of what they wanted throughout the day, including for people who, because of their illness remained in their bedrooms. Due to the current building works at the home, people have a limited choice of where to choose to eat their meals, however the people we spoke with during the inspection recognised there is little that can be done until the homes extension is finished when it is intended there will be an increase in dining places. Care Homes for Older People Page 15 of 26 Complaints and protection These are the outcomes that people staying in care homes should experience. They reflect the things that people have said are important to them: If people have concerns with their care, they or people close to them know how to complain. Any concern is looked into and action taken to put things right. The care home safeguards people from abuse and neglect and takes action to follow up any allegations. People’s legal rights are protected, including being able to vote in elections. This is what people staying in this care home experience: Judgement: People using this service experience good quality outcomes in this area. We have made this judgement using a range of evidence, including a visit to this service. People know how to complain and concerns and complaints are listened to and acted upon. Staff know how to safeguard adults from harm and abuse. Evidence: The complaints procedure is displayed on a notice board in the reception and is also available within the service user guide. The procedure provides people with clear information on the process to follow and who to contact if people want to complain. The people and visitors we spoke with told us they are satisfied with the home and would tell the staff if they were not happy with something. They said they feel confident that the staff and manager would act to put things right. The AQAA from the manager stated that two complaints have been received in the last 12 months. We looked at the processes used by the company and manager to respond and act on complaints which shows the home deals with complaints effectively. The training records we looked at and the staff we spoke with demonstrates that all staff working at Myford House receive training on safeguarding vulnerable adults from the risk of abuse. Staff could describe to us their role in safeguarding adults from the risk of harm and abuse. The manager knows when to refer concerns to the local safeguarding adults team for investigation under their procedures. The staff team have attended awareness training in the Mental Capacity Act (2005) and Deprivation of Liberty Safeguards and we saw leaflets for staff and visitors to Care Homes for Older People Page 16 of 26 Evidence: refer to. The Act governs decision making on behalf of adults, and applies when people lose mental capacity at some point in their lives or where the incapacitating condition has been present since birth. It is important that staff know how to put the Act into every day practice and the procedure to follow when peoples freedom may need to be restricted. Staff gave good explanations to us about the Act and how it might apply to their work. Care Homes for Older People Page 17 of 26 Environment These are the outcomes that people staying in care homes should experience. They reflect the things that people have said are important to them: People stay in a safe and well-maintained home that is homely, clean, pleasant and hygienic. People stay in a home that has enough space and facilities for them to lead the life they choose and to meet their needs. The home makes sure they have the right specialist equipment that encourages and promotes their independence. Their room feels like their own, it is comfortable and they feel safe when they use it. This is what people staying in this care home experience: Judgement: People using this service experience good quality outcomes in this area. We have made this judgement using a range of evidence, including a visit to this service. People are provided with a homely environment and are happy with their bedrooms. Completion of planned refurbishments will further enhance the home. Evidence: We looked at the rooms for the people we case tracked, which were clean and wellmaintained. We saw that people are able to bring in items which are important to them, such as photographs, pictures and small items of furniture. There is currently a choice of single rooms and shared rooms for two people. Shared rooms have a large floor to ceiling curtain between the beds to provide privacy. All rooms have a wash hand basin and there are toilets and bathrooms nearby. We saw that most people have the facility of a commode in their rooms and the home has a procedure and suitable equipment for ensuring commodes are kept clean. We saw the home has equipment to help move people safely such as hoists and staff told us that there is enough of this equipment to meet peoples varying needs. There is a choice of stairs or passenger lift to the first and second floors. Building work has taken place over the past twelve months whilst an extension to the home is built. Building work was in progress at the time of our inspection and throughout the day staff were seen making an effort to ensure noise and disruption was kept to a minimum by closing doors and informing people what was happening. It is intended the extension will lead to additional and improved living accommodation, Care Homes for Older People Page 18 of 26 Evidence: such as bedrooms with en-suites, new bathrooms and lounges/dining areas. Despite the inconvenience of the building works, people told us of their satisfaction with the home and that their bedrooms are kept clean. The manager told us in the AQAA of some of the improvements which have taken place with the environment in the past twelve months including new equipment for infection control and that a replacement kitchen has been fitted. The home was recently awarded a five star rating from the local environmental health officer, which indicates very high standards of compliance with food safety legislation. Care Homes for Older People Page 19 of 26 Staffing These are the outcomes that people staying in care homes should experience. They reflect the things that people have said are important to them: People have safe and appropriate support as there are enough competent staff on duty at all times. They have confidence in the staff at the home because checks have been done to make sure that they are suitable to care for them. Their needs are met and they are cared for by staff who get the relevant training and support from their managers. There are no additional outcomes. This is what people staying in this care home experience: Judgement: People using this service experience good quality outcomes in this area. We have made this judgement using a range of evidence, including a visit to this service. People are supported by staff who have the skills and knowledge to meet their needs and who are suitable to work with vulnerable adults. Evidence: We spoke with staff, observed them working and discussed staffing levels with the manager and staff which indicated that sufficient skilled care and nursing staff were on duty to meet the needs of people currently living at home. We looked at surveys completed in October by three people living at the home, which showed that at that time people viewed there needed to be more staff. We received surveys which showed varying views on whether the home has sufficient staff. Six people who completed surveys for us described how there is always or usually enough staff, three people responded sometimes. All the people who responded described how they always receive the care and support they need. Four staff told us in surveys that there are usually enough staff and six commented sometimes. The manager described how the home uses agency staff in conjunction with its own staff when additional staff cover is needed, such as when sickness occurs or because staff have left. The home is currently in the process of recruiting more staff and the manager confirmed staffing levels are reviewed depending on the needs and numbers of people at the home. Six people who live at home told us they view there are enough staff to help them and they told us that if they press their call buzzer when they are in their bedrooms that Care Homes for Older People Page 20 of 26 Evidence: staff will answer it quickly. They also described how, if they need assistance during the night, staff respond to their requests sensitively and promptly. Four visitors we spoke with viewed that there always seems to be enough staff when they visit. We looked at written records which showed the training which has been undertaken by staff and training which is planned. This demonstrates that regular staff training takes place, including training in safe working practice topics such as fire safety, moving and handling, safe use of bed rails as well as more specific training such as dementia care, palliative care and the prevention of falls. This helps to ensure staff have the skills and knowledge to meet the needs of people living at Myford House. A nurse we spoke with described the support given to ensure nurses clinical skills are kept up to date. All staff we spoke with view they are provided with good training opportunities and gave us examples of the training they have done since working at the home. At the time of completing the AQAA, the manager informed us that almost 50 of care staff had achieved a recognised qualification in care (National Vocation Qualification). The manager confirmed during the inspection that almost all care staff have now either achieved or are studying for this qualification and this should contribute to ensuring the staff team have an effective knowledge of social care. We looked at the process used by the home to recruit three members of staff who have started working at the home since the last key inspection. All parts of the recruitment process were accurately recorded and demonstrated that pre-employment information, such as references and POVA (Protection of Vulnerable Adults) checks had been sought prior to two of these staff working at the home. For the other member of staff they had evidence on the file to show that the manager had been in contact with their previous employer to find out about the persons suitability for the post for which they were applying, but had not received this confirmation in writing. The manager acknowledged this deficit and took action to rectify it during the inspection, but this highlights a need to ensure recruitment practices fully meet our regulations. The manager confirmed that information is sought from agency staff employers to ensure agency staff who come to work at the home have been checked for their suitability to work with vulnerable adults. Meetings for staff take place on a regular basis. Minutes are kept of these meetings which show that nursing staff are kept updated with clinical matters and all staff are kept informed of issues relating to topics such as health and safety and care practice. Care Homes for Older People Page 21 of 26 Management and administration These are the outcomes that people staying in care homes should experience. They reflect the things that people have said are important to them: People have confidence in the care home because it is led and managed appropriately. People control their own money and choose how they spend it. If they or someone close to them cannot manage their money, it is managed by the care home in their best interests. The environment is safe for people and staff because appropriate health and safety practices are carried out. People get the right support from the care home because the manager runs it appropriately with an open approach that makes them feel valued and respected. The people staying at the home are safeguarded because it follows clear financial and accounting procedures, keeps records appropriately and ensures their staff understand the way things should be done. They get the right care because the staff are supervised and supported by their managers. This is what people staying in this care home experience: Judgement: People using this service experience good quality outcomes in this area. We have made this judgement using a range of evidence, including a visit to this service. The manager, Ms Lisa Hatch communicates a clear sense of direction, leadership and ensures the home is safe and run in the best interests for the people who live there. Evidence: Since the last inspection there has been a change in the management arrangements in that a new manager, Ms Lisa Hatch started working at the home in August 2009, following the resignation of the previous manager. We received good feedback from people who live at the home and their visitors describing the manager as approachable and someone who they feel they can speak with. Staff also gave positive feedback and said they feel supported to give good care. Throughout the inspection there was a relaxed, friendly atmosphere and staff were clearly working as a team. A representative of the company monitors quality at regular intervals with monthly unannounced visits and we observed the reports produced as a result of these visits. We also looked at how the home provides people with opportunities to comment on different aspects of the home through surveys. The manager also described in the Care Homes for Older People Page 22 of 26 Evidence: AQAA how the home intends to improve communication through regular meetings with people who live at the home, their relatives and staff. Information was provided within the AQAA to confirm servicing and maintenance of equipment is undertaken and policies and procedures are reviewed. We looked at a selection of maintenance and servicing records during the inspection, all were up to date and demonstrate that systems are in place to ensure the home and equipment is safe, such as the checking of bed rails and hoist equipment. We saw a fire drill had recently taken place, so staff should be aware of the procedures to follow in the event of a fire. We looked at records relating to the management of small amounts of personal monies and the process used by the home appeared robust with receipts kept to show spending and transactions checked by two people, which should ensure peoples money is held safely. Since starting work at the home the manager has kept us informed of the occurrence of accidents and incidents and has demonstrated that she knows when to refer to other agencies. The manager responded to a request by the Commission to complete an AQAA, which is an opportunity for services to share with us areas they believe they are doing well, and where they could improve. The manager provided us with clear, relevant information of what the home does well, improvements which have occurred and plans for future improvement. Care Homes for Older People Page 23 of 26 Are there any outstanding requirements from the last inspection? Yes £ No R Outstanding statutory requirements These are requirements that were set at the previous inspection, but have still not been met. They say what the registered person had to do to meet the Care Standards Act 2000, Care Homes Regulations 2001 and the National Minimum Standards. No. Standard Regulation Requirement Timescale for action Care Homes for Older People Page 24 of 26 Requirements and recommendations from this inspection: Immediate requirements: These are immediate requirements that were set on the day we visited this care home. The registered person had to meet these within 48 hours. No. Standard Regulation Requirement Timescale for action Statutory requirements These requirements set out what the registered person must do to meet the Care Standards Act 2000, Care Homes Regulations 2001 and the National Minimum Standards. The registered person(s) must do this within the timescales we have set. No. Standard Regulation Requirement Timescale for action Recommendations These recommendations are taken from the best practice described in the National Minimum Standards and the registered person(s) should consider them as a way of improving their service. No Refer to Standard Good Practice Recommendations Care Homes for Older People Page 25 of 26 Helpline: Telephone: 03000 616161 Email: enquiries@cqc.org.uk Web: www.cqc.org.uk We want people to be able to access this information. If you would like a summary in a different format or language please contact our helpline or go to our website. Copyright © (2009) Care Quality Commission (CQC). This publication may be reproduced in whole or in part, free of charge, in any format or medium provided that it is not used for commercial gain. This consent is subject to the material being reproduced accurately and on proviso that it is not used in a derogatory manner or misleading context. 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