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Care Home: Philia Lodge Rest Home

  • 113-115 Eastfield Road Peterborough PE1 4AU
  • Tel: 01733567758
  • Fax: 01733561353
  • Planned feature Advertise here!

Philia Lodge provides care, support and accommodation for up to nineteen older people. The home is close to the centre of Peterborough; accommodation is provided in two houses which have been linked together, extended and adapted to provide suitable accommodation for older people. The home has seventeen single bedrooms and one double bedroom; ten of the rooms are on the ground floor and in the new extension, the remainder are on the first floor, which is accessed by stairs or a spacious shaft lift. Communal areas consist of two lounges, extended conservatory, a dining room, and a seating area in the large hallway. Residents also have access to a wellmaintained garden to the rear, which is enclosed, and secure. A sensory garden, recently developed made the garden more desired area in the home. The home primarily accommodates service users that belong to the Jehovah`s Witnesses faith. Most staff belong to the same faith group. Previous inspection report is displayed in the hallway and is available to the users of the service, staff and visitors. The fee was available on request from the home, but was in the range of £357.56 to only one of £600.

  • Latitude: 52.580001831055
    Longitude: -0.23299999535084
  • Manager: Manager Post Vacant
  • Price p/w: ~
  • UK
  • Total Capacity: 19
  • Type: Care home only
  • Provider: Care Provision Healthcare Ltd
  • Ownership: Private
  • Care Home ID: 12306
Residents Needs:
Dementia, Old age, not falling within any other category

Latest Inspection

This is the latest available inspection report for this service, carried out on 29th August 2008. CSCI found this care home to be providing an Good service.

The inspector made no statutory requirements on the home as a result of this inspection and there were no outstanding actions from the previous inspection report.

For extracts, read the latest CQC inspection for Philia Lodge Rest Home.

What the care home does well Although the home had up to date documents with relevant information about the home, most information about the home was shared among people interested in it verbally. The advantage of this was that people talked directly to the users of the service and were getting information based on the users` personal experiences of living in this home. Sharing the same fate also helped people living here to form relationships based on respect and some similar interests and views. The staff group also belonged to the same faith and this helped them understand the lifestyle, wishes and even the type of the activities organised in the home to be in line with the faith they all shared. "It is very nice here. Time goes quickly. We have exercises twice a week, very appetising meals, staff are nice. We are generally very, very happy here", stated two users spoken to during the inspection. Staff files contained evidence of good checking process, some references were obtained from abroad (as in one file from Italy) and all new staff were checked within CRB (Criminal records Bureau) and POVA (Protection of Vulnerable Adults) lists.Keeping training high on the agenda resulted in staff all being trained on mandatory subjects and achieving an excellent level of qualified staff on NVQ programmes. The manager was now spending more time in the home, allowing more direct contact with people that lived here and creating more opportunities for outings for the users of the service. The new recording system and the rule to keep hard copies of essential documents provided much better evidenced good work, good care and better protection for people that used the service. What has improved since the last inspection? The manager was registered with the regulation authorities. The staff number was increased and a new increase of carers was on the way, with the intention to complete the increase by November this year. Two staff in the office created opportunities for outings, in addition to improved administration. A new extension was completed creating not only 6 more rooms, but also a nice sensory garden, new improved look of the building and resulting in increased communal space created for extra users of the service. As the conditions of users of the service started to deteriorate and some of them were affected by dementia, the home introduced the relevant training on dementia, changed the colour of the toilet to allow dementia sufferers better orientation and planning further training on this subject for all staff. The new sensory garden with various plants and strawberries also encouraged people that live in the home to spend some time outside. "Full of Beans", an exercise programme, was very much appreciated by the people living in the home. Quality assurance review helped the home identify areas for improvements and the action plan had already given some positive results: one-to-one sessions were created for each individual living in the home with volunteers from the congregation. What the care home could do better: Plans for further improvements made by the home included the installation of a stair lift in addition to the existing passenger lift that had started failing recently. The home responded to the problem by creating an emergency plan for horizontal and vertical moving of the users, as a precautionary measure while the problem gets resolved and prior to the installation of the new alternative, a stair lift. Further training on dementia needed to be expanded to the next level and provide more in-depth information, especially addressing activities for people being affected by dementia. The manager and his assistant were aware that supervision for staff could be better and had prepared plans for improvements in this area. CARE HOMES FOR OLDER PEOPLE Philia Lodge Rest Home 113-115 Eastfield Road Peterborough PE1 4AU Lead Inspector Dragan Cvejic Unannounced Inspection 29th August 2008 08:00 29/08/08 08:00 X10015.doc Version 1.40 Page 1 The Commission for Social Care Inspection aims to: • • • • Put the people who use social care first Improve services and stamp out bad practice Be an expert voice on social care Practise what we preach in our own organisation Reader Information Document Purpose Author Audience Further copies from Copyright Inspection Report CSCI General Public 0870 240 7535 (telephone order line) This report is copyright Commission for Social Care Inspection (CSCI) and may only be used in its entirety. Extracts may not be used or reproduced without the express permission of CSCI www.csci.org.uk Internet address Philia Lodge Rest Home DS0000064347.V368585.R02.S.doc Version 5.2 Page 2 This is a report of an inspection to assess whether services are meeting the needs of people who use them. The legal basis for conducting inspections is the Care Standards Act 2000 and the relevant National Minimum Standards for this establishment are those for Care Homes for Older People. They can be found at www.dh.gov.uk or obtained from The Stationery Office (TSO) PO Box 29, St Crispins, Duke Street, Norwich, NR3 1GN. Tel: 0870 600 5522. Online ordering: www.tso.co.uk/bookshop This report is a public document. Extracts may not be used or reproduced without the prior permission of the Commission for Social Care Inspection. Philia Lodge Rest Home DS0000064347.V368585.R02.S.doc Version 5.2 Page 3 SERVICE INFORMATION Name of service Philia Lodge Rest Home Address 113-115 Eastfield Road Peterborough PE1 4AU Telephone number Fax number Email address Provider Web address Name of registered provider(s)/company (if applicable) Name of registered manager (if applicable) Type of registration No. of places registered (if applicable) 01733 567758 01733 561353 john@careprovision.co.uk Care Provision Healthcare Ltd John Frank-Onejuba Care Home 19 Category(ies) of Dementia (6), Old age, not falling within any registration, with number other category (19) of places Philia Lodge Rest Home DS0000064347.V368585.R02.S.doc Version 5.2 Page 4 SERVICE INFORMATION Conditions of registration: 1. The double room must only be used to accommodate a couple who have made an active choice to share; this must be clearly documented and a copy must be kept on each person`s file. 29/08/06 Date of last inspection Brief Description of the Service: Philia Lodge provides care, support and accommodation for up to nineteen older people. The home is close to the centre of Peterborough; accommodation is provided in two houses which have been linked together, extended and adapted to provide suitable accommodation for older people. The home has seventeen single bedrooms and one double bedroom; ten of the rooms are on the ground floor and in the new extension, the remainder are on the first floor, which is accessed by stairs or a spacious shaft lift. Communal areas consist of two lounges, extended conservatory, a dining room, and a seating area in the large hallway. Residents also have access to a wellmaintained garden to the rear, which is enclosed, and secure. A sensory garden, recently developed made the garden more desired area in the home. The home primarily accommodates service users that belong to the Jehovah’s Witnesses faith. Most staff belong to the same faith group. Previous inspection report is displayed in the hallway and is available to the users of the service, staff and visitors. The fee was available on request from the home, but was in the range of £357.56 to only one of £600. Philia Lodge Rest Home DS0000064347.V368585.R02.S.doc Version 5.2 Page 5 SUMMARY This is an overview of what the inspector found during the inspection. The quality rating for this service is 2 star. This means the people who use this service experience good quality outcomes. This was an unannounced inspection of the service. However, a thematic inspection and an annual service review had also been conducted since the last inspection and some of the elements were incorporated into this report. For this inspection, we followed the service through the regulatory reporting system, whereby the home informed us, The Commission for Social Care Inspection, about events affecting the home and service users. We asked the home to carry out a self-assessment of their provisions and to report to us in a format named AQAA, the Annual Quality Assurance Assessment. We also sent questionnaires to the users of the service, their relatives and the staff and received a response from users, relatives and staff. We visited the home on 29/08/08 and talked to the newly registered manager, to several users of the service and to the staff. We checked 4 users’ files, 3 staff files and some other documents held by the home. We observed staff administering medication and checked the records and other relevant elements related to medication. We toured the building and the garden. The manager and his assistant accommodated our inspection and provided comments and evidence used to inform our report. What the service does well: Although the home had up to date documents with relevant information about the home, most information about the home was shared among people interested in it verbally. The advantage of this was that people talked directly to the users of the service and were getting information based on the users’ personal experiences of living in this home. Sharing the same fate also helped people living here to form relationships based on respect and some similar interests and views. The staff group also belonged to the same faith and this helped them understand the lifestyle, wishes and even the type of the activities organised in the home to be in line with the faith they all shared. “It is very nice here. Time goes quickly. We have exercises twice a week, very appetising meals, staff are nice. We are generally very, very happy here”, stated two users spoken to during the inspection. Staff files contained evidence of good checking process, some references were obtained from abroad (as in one file from Italy) and all new staff were checked within CRB (Criminal records Bureau) and POVA (Protection of Vulnerable Adults) lists. Philia Lodge Rest Home DS0000064347.V368585.R02.S.doc Version 5.2 Page 6 Keeping training high on the agenda resulted in staff all being trained on mandatory subjects and achieving an excellent level of qualified staff on NVQ programmes. The manager was now spending more time in the home, allowing more direct contact with people that lived here and creating more opportunities for outings for the users of the service. The new recording system and the rule to keep hard copies of essential documents provided much better evidenced good work, good care and better protection for people that used the service. What has improved since the last inspection? What they could do better: Plans for further improvements made by the home included the installation of a stair lift in addition to the existing passenger lift that had started failing recently. The home responded to the problem by creating an emergency plan for horizontal and vertical moving of the users, as a precautionary measure while the problem gets resolved and prior to the installation of the new alternative, a stair lift. Further training on dementia needed to be expanded to the next level and provide more in-depth information, especially addressing activities for people being affected by dementia. The manager and his assistant were aware that supervision for staff could be better and had prepared plans for improvements in this area. Philia Lodge Rest Home DS0000064347.V368585.R02.S.doc Version 5.2 Page 7 Please contact the provider for advice of actions taken in response to this inspection. The report of this inspection is available from enquiries@csci.gsi.gov.uk or by contacting your local CSCI office. The summary of this inspection report can be made available in other formats on request. Philia Lodge Rest Home DS0000064347.V368585.R02.S.doc Version 5.2 Page 8 DETAILS OF INSPECTOR FINDINGS CONTENTS Choice of Home (Standards 1–6) Health and Personal Care (Standards 7-11) Daily Life and Social Activities (Standards 12-15) Complaints and Protection (Standards 16-18) Environment (Standards 19-26) Staffing (Standards 27-30) Management and Administration (Standards 31-38) Scoring of Outcomes Statutory Requirements Identified During the Inspection Philia Lodge Rest Home DS0000064347.V368585.R02.S.doc Version 5.2 Page 9 Choice of Home The intended outcomes for Standards 1 – 6 are: 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. Prospective service users have the information they need to make an informed choice about where to live. Each service user has a written contract/ statement of terms and conditions with the home. No service user moves into the home without having had his/her needs assessed and been assured that these will be met. Service users and their representatives know that the home they enter will meet their needs. Prospective service users and their relatives and friends have an opportunity to visit and assess the quality, facilities and suitability of the home. Service users assessed and referred solely for intermediate care are helped to maximise their independence and return home. The Commission considers Standards 3 and 6 the key standards to be inspected. JUDGEMENT – we looked at outcomes for the following standard(s): 1,2,3,4 Quality in this outcome area is good. This judgement has been made using available evidence including a visit to this service. The service users were given accurate and well organised information about the home enabling them to make an informed choice, both verbally and in written documents. The assessment for each individual was detailed and equipped the home with all the necessary information to decide if the prospective user’s needs could be met. EVIDENCE: The home reviewed and updated their documentation, which contained information about the service. However, the main method for sharing this information among potential users of the service was verbal communication. The home was well known among the followers of the same religion and this was sufficient for all interested Philia Lodge Rest Home DS0000064347.V368585.R02.S.doc Version 5.2 Page 10 parties. In addition, many users of the service became permanent residents after previous respite periods in this home. “My mum has got a contract”, stated a relative in her returned questionnaire. The home was also inspected under the thematic inspection rules less than a year ago when contracts were topic of the inspection. This inspection showed that the majority of users were fully aware of the contracts. It also showed that contracts were fair and appropriate. Four files of the users of the service were checked and all contained the details of the initial assessments carried out prior to offering places to these people. Their care plans were based on this initial information and addressed all aspects of care needs identified initially and soon after the admission. Two users of the service spoken to confirmed that their needs were met. Philia Lodge Rest Home DS0000064347.V368585.R02.S.doc Version 5.2 Page 11 Health and Personal Care The intended outcomes for Standards 7 – 11 are: 7. 8. 9. 10. 11. The service user’s health, personal and social care needs are set out in an individual plan of care. Service users’ health care needs are fully met. Service users, where appropriate, are responsible for their own medication, and are protected by the home’s policies and procedures for dealing with medicines. Service users feel they are treated with respect and their right to privacy is upheld. Service users are assured that at the time of their death, staff will treat them and their family with care, sensitivity and respect. The Commission considers Standards 7, 8, 9 and 10 the key standards to be inspected. JUDGEMENT – we looked at outcomes for the following standard(s): 7,8,9,10 Quality in this outcome area is good. This judgement has been made using available evidence including a visit to this service. An appropriate approach to healthcare needs, good records, good medication management and high respect for privacy and dignity ensured the full satisfaction of users of the service. EVIDENCE: Care plans were checked in four files. Sufficient and clearly described needs were discussed and agreed with users who signed the plans. Risk assessments were separate documents, but were well related to care plans and addressed the issues containing risk as presented in care plans. One of the examples contained a separate fire risk assessment for a user who was a registered blind. Review dates recorded showed that both care plans and risk assessments were reviewed monthly. Another file contained an extra review when the hearing condition of one user changed. Philia Lodge Rest Home DS0000064347.V368585.R02.S.doc Version 5.2 Page 12 The third file showed how the home reacted when a discrepancy on a weight chart indicated the need for action. Clear instruction about helping the user to eat and measuring amounts of food consumed were recorded in the revised care plan. Health care records included audiologist, optician, dentist and chiropodist’s appointments. A user with under-eating problems was assessed by a GP and the nutritionist on the initiative of the home and a mutual plan to help her resulted in weight gain, closely monitored on a weight chart. The staff were observed helping a user with dementia and slight mobility problems negotiate the slope and the entrance to the conservatory, in order to retain her independence and still remain safe. Medication issues were checked through inspecting the storage, records and procedure for administering medication. Two records were checked and were accurate. The home currently did not have to administer any controlled drugs, as no user was prescribed any of this type of medication. The staff spotted a discrepancy in MAR chart and the medication supplied by the pharmacist in a dose box and alerted the pharmacy, so the problem was resolved. The users’ files contained up to date risk assessments for those who were self medicating. The manager reported in their AQAA (Annual Quality Assurance Assessment): “1. There is a clear understanding of which drugs are “controlled drugs”. 2. There is now a clear separation of external and internal medicines. 3. We liaise with the pharmacist to ensure all relevant staff receive in-depth training on medication from the pharmacist.” Care plan entries regarding medication were also related and well documented, as one example showed: “Please give her Paracetamol regularly, not as PRN”. The same message was on the MAR chart, signed by a GP. Privacy and dignity were highly respected within the home. Many users addressed each other and all the guests as brothers and sisters, appropriate for the religious way of addressing people. The staff were fully aware of this fact and were observed respecting it when they addressed particular users. The home introduced one-to-one meetings for each individual with external members of the same congregation, thus creating an opportunity for a better advocacy service when it was needed. One couple, a husband and wife, occupied two rooms, one of which they decided to use a bedroom and the other as their own lounge. Some users had personal telephone lines installed in their bedrooms. Philia Lodge Rest Home DS0000064347.V368585.R02.S.doc Version 5.2 Page 13 Daily Life and Social Activities The intended outcomes for Standards 12 - 15 are: 12. 13. 14. 15. Service users find the lifestyle experienced in the home matches their expectations and preferences, and satisfies their social, cultural, religious and recreational interests and needs. Service users maintain contact with family/ friends/ representatives and the local community as they wish. Service users are helped to exercise choice and control over their lives. Service users receive a wholesome appealing balanced diet in pleasing surroundings at times convenient to them. The Commission considers all of the above key standards to be inspected. JUDGEMENT – we looked at outcomes for the following standard(s): 12,13,14,15 Quality in this outcome area is good. This judgement has been made using available evidence including a visit to this service. Service users autonomy, independence and wishes were respected and promoted. EVIDENCE: The home provided a structured and organised daily routine for service users. A weekly programme was displayed in the hall. Checked files contained records of activities that each individual either took part in, or, as seen in one file, refused to take part in. The AQAA explained: “We take residents to Park/Garden centres” “We have exercise three times a week”, commented the user spoken to, expressing her satisfaction with the activities. A married couple living in the home were spoken to just before they went out for a short walk and also confirmed that they were happy with the daily routine and with organised activities. The home expanded local connections by inviting volunteers from the congregation to offer one-to-one sessions with each individual and act on users’ behalf if necessary, thus taking advocacy roles. Philia Lodge Rest Home DS0000064347.V368585.R02.S.doc Version 5.2 Page 14 A user suffering from dementia was observed walking from the conservatory to the sensory garden and back and staff sensitively encouraged her to remain independent by pointing out to the potential risk of falls when she felt a bit unstable. The records showed that falls were rare and incidental, rather than the result of users having been left to walk alone while there were potential hazards. Breakfast time was seen as being relaxed, unhurried and comfortable for users of the service. Menus, temperature records and health and safety records in the kitchen were appropriate. Many users briefly contacted during the site visit praised the food. Two users of the service commented on how much they liked the tablecloths in the dining room and how the food was nicely presented. Philia Lodge Rest Home DS0000064347.V368585.R02.S.doc Version 5.2 Page 15 Complaints and Protection The intended outcomes for Standards 16 - 18 are: 16. 17. 18. Service users and their relatives and friends are confident that their complaints will be listened to, taken seriously and acted upon. Service users’ legal rights are protected. Service users are protected from abuse. The Commission considers Standards 16 and 18 the key standards to be. JUDGEMENT – we looked at outcomes for the following standard(s): 16,18 Quality in this outcome area is good. This judgement has been made using available evidence including a visit to this service. An effective and accessible procedure was in place to protect service users through safe working practices. EVIDENCE: The complaints procedure was displayed and available to service users, visitors and staff. The home had not received any complaints since the last inspection. A concern received was appropriately dealt with and satisfactorily resolved. The home had the policies and procedures in place that ensured the protection of service users. The staff spoken to stated that they knew their role in a potential complaints procedure. All staff received POVA (Protection of Vulnerable Adults) training to ensure better protection of users of the service. All responses in questionnaires showed that users of the service, their relatives and staff were fully aware of the complaints procedure. Philia Lodge Rest Home DS0000064347.V368585.R02.S.doc Version 5.2 Page 16 Environment The intended outcomes for Standards 19 – 26 are: 19. 20. 21. 22. 23. 24. 25. 26. Service users live in a safe, well-maintained environment. Service users have access to safe and comfortable indoor and outdoor communal facilities. Service users have sufficient and suitable lavatories and washing facilities. Service users have the specialist equipment they require to maximise their independence. Service users’ own rooms suit their needs. Service users live in safe, comfortable bedrooms with their own possessions around them. Service users live in safe, comfortable surroundings. The home is clean, pleasant and hygienic. The Commission considers Standards 19 and 26 the key standards to be inspected. JUDGEMENT – we looked at outcomes for the following standard(s): 19,26 Quality in this outcome area is good. This judgement has been made using available evidence including a visit to this service. The home offered a nice, bright and appropriately equipped and maintained environment making the place not just safe but also a pleasant home for users of the service. EVIDENCE: The home had been through significant changes since the last key inspection. An extension with extra 6 bedrooms was completed. The conservatory was now used by the users of the service. The home was now accessible throughout for wheelchair users. “Partially sighted and blind people do have access”, stated their AQAA. A toilet door was painted into a different colour, making it more noticeable for people with dementia. Philia Lodge Rest Home DS0000064347.V368585.R02.S.doc Version 5.2 Page 17 Two users spoken to in detail during the site visit stated: “We are very happy with bedrooms. We have all we need. We can bring our own things.” After the completion of extension works, the garden became accessible again and the new sensory garden, with a nice pathway around the new extension was developed. Many new plants including strawberries now grew in the garden. A maintenance man commented that some users regularly come out in the garden and enjoy fresh air in a safe and nice environment. The only double bedroom was used by a married couple who converted one room into their bedroom and use the other as their lounge. The home currently experienced problems with passenger lift faults and, in addition to the emergency contingency plan, they were considering installing a stair lift to ensure better protection and easier movement for users of the service. The home was inspected recently by health and safety, fire service and council carried out an inspection of medication processes, ensuring infection control and safe working practices were in place. A tour of the building during the site visit showed that the home was clean, bright, well maintained and safe regarding infection control. The location of the laundry room in a separate part of the premises helped maintain infection control. Philia Lodge Rest Home DS0000064347.V368585.R02.S.doc Version 5.2 Page 18 Staffing The intended outcomes for Standards 27 – 30 are: 27. 28. 29. 30. Service users’ needs are met by the numbers and skill mix of staff. Service users are in safe hands at all times. Service users are supported and protected by the home’s recruitment policy and practices. Staff are trained and competent to do their jobs. The Commission consider all the above are key standards to be inspected. JUDGEMENT – we looked at outcomes for the following standard(s): 27,28,29,30 Quality in this outcome area is good. This judgement has been made using available evidence including a visit to this service. The home was considering the service users’ needs when the staffing level was decided and the recruitment process was initiated when there was a need to employ more staff. Staff were well trained, belonged to the same faith group as service users and were able to show respect for service users religious needs. EVIDENCE: The home employed staff with the same religious orientation. This helped staff better understand the needs, preferences and views of service users. This fact was a positive element of equal opportunities in the home where all service users belonged to the same faith. Another example of respecting equal opportunities was seen in the nationalities of workers, as some they came from locations as diverse Italy, Poland and India. Staff complement was sufficient to respond to the needs of people that used the service, but deteriorating health and development of dementia affecting more and more users of the service indicated the need for a review of the staffing level. The manager reported that they were considering an increase in staff number for the afternoon shift and the recruitment process was already running, new candidates had been interviewed, but the home was conducting all necessary checks. Philia Lodge Rest Home DS0000064347.V368585.R02.S.doc Version 5.2 Page 19 The staff files checked showed that all staff were properly checked before starting employment. Expanding mandatory training by introducing specific training on dementia was another positive move by the home to ensure the needs of the people cared for were responded to in the best possible way. Training records showed that staff received all mandatory training and updated all necessary mandatory subjects. The home exceeded minimum standard by achieving almost 90 of staff either holding or working towards the NVQ qualifications. Philia Lodge Rest Home DS0000064347.V368585.R02.S.doc Version 5.2 Page 20 Management and Administration The intended outcomes for Standards 31 – 38 are: 31. 32. 33. 34. 35. 36. 37. 38. Service users live in a home which is run and managed by a person who is fit to be in charge, of good character and able to discharge his or her responsibilities fully. Service users benefit from the ethos, leadership and management approach of the home. The home is run in the best interests of service users. Service users are safeguarded by the accounting and financial procedures of the home. Service users’ financial interests are safeguarded. Staff are appropriately supervised. Service users’ rights and best interests are safeguarded by the home’s record keeping, policies and procedures. The health, safety and welfare of service users and staff are promoted and protected. The Commission considers Standards 31, 33, 35 and 38 the key standards to be inspected. JUDGEMENT – we looked at outcomes for the following standard(s): 31,33,35,36,38 Quality in this outcome area is good. This judgement has been made using available evidence including a visit to this service. The home ensured the safety and welfare of service users. Safe working practices were in place to protect both staff and users of the service. EVIDENCE: The manager of the home completed his NVQ 4 and RMA (Registered Manager’s Award) qualification and successfully went through the registration process. The quality assurance process was running continuously and the results from the last round of questionnaires were checked during the site visit. The home also used all their meetings to informally conduct a review of satisfaction with services with people that used the service and staff. Philia Lodge Rest Home DS0000064347.V368585.R02.S.doc Version 5.2 Page 21 The home generally did not deal with users’ money. Several users of the service stated that they control their own money. A staff supervision plan was created and the regular sessions were planned, ensuring the frequency corresponds to the required number of individual sessions per year. Staff also were supported through staff meetings. A maintenance man stated: I feel well supported and listened to although I am not here all the time. When I come, everyone is open and supportive to me. The manager contacts me regularly to check if I have any issues that need discussion.” Safe working practices were in place. The last fire department inspection resulted in a number of requirements, but, by the time of this inspection, all these requirements were met. Health and safety inspection did not result in any specific requirements and demonstrated that the home operated safely and in the best interests of the people that used the service. Philia Lodge Rest Home DS0000064347.V368585.R02.S.doc Version 5.2 Page 22 SCORING OF OUTCOMES This page summarises the assessment of the extent to which the National Minimum Standards for Care Homes for Older People have been met and uses the following scale. The scale ranges from: 4 Standard Exceeded 2 Standard Almost Met (Commendable) (Minor Shortfalls) 3 Standard Met 1 Standard Not Met (No Shortfalls) (Major Shortfalls) “X” in the standard met box denotes standard not assessed on this occasion “N/A” in the standard met box denotes standard not applicable CHOICE OF HOME Standard No Score 1 2 3 4 5 6 ENVIRONMENT Standard No Score 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 3 3 3 3 X N/A HEALTH AND PERSONAL CARE Standard No Score 7 3 8 3 9 3 10 3 11 X DAILY LIFE AND SOCIAL ACTIVITIES Standard No Score 12 3 13 3 14 3 15 3 COMPLAINTS AND PROTECTION Standard No Score 16 3 17 X 18 3 3 X X X X X X 3 STAFFING Standard No Score 27 3 28 4 29 3 30 3 MANAGEMENT AND ADMINISTRATION Standard No 31 32 33 34 35 36 37 38 Score 3 X 3 X 3 3 X 3 Philia Lodge Rest Home DS0000064347.V368585.R02.S.doc Version 5.2 Page 23 Are there any outstanding requirements from the last inspection? No STATUTORY REQUIREMENTS This section sets out the actions, which must be taken so that the registered person/s meets the Care Standards Act 2000, Care Homes Regulations 2001 and the National Minimum Standards. The Registered Provider(s) must comply with the given timescales. No. Standard Regulation Requirement Timescale for action RECOMMENDATIONS These recommendations relate to National Minimum Standards and are seen as good practice for the Registered Provider/s to consider carrying out. No. Refer to Standard Good Practice Recommendations Philia Lodge Rest Home DS0000064347.V368585.R02.S.doc Version 5.2 Page 24 Commission for Social Care Inspection Eastern Region Commission for Social Care Inspection Eastern Regional Contact Team CPC1, Capital Park Fulbourn Cambridge, CB21 5XE National Enquiry Line: Telephone: 0845 015 0120 or 0191 233 3323 Textphone: 0845 015 2255 or 0191 233 3588 Email: enquiries@csci.gsi.gov.uk Web: www.csci.org.uk © This report is copyright Commission for Social Care Inspection (CSCI) and may only be used in its entirety. Extracts may not be used or reproduced without the express permission of CSCI Philia Lodge Rest Home DS0000064347.V368585.R02.S.doc Version 5.2 Page 25 - Please note that this information is included on www.bestcarehome.co.uk under license from the regulator. Re-publishing this information is in breach of the terms of use of that website. 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