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Care Home: Well House

  • Chestnut Way Brightlingsea Essex CO7 0UH
  • Tel: 01206303311
  • Fax: 01206306130
  • Planned feature Advertise here!

  • Latitude: 51.814998626709
    Longitude: 1.0190000534058
  • Manager: Ms Kerry Jane Williams
  • Price p/w: ~
  • UK
  • Total Capacity: 43
  • Type: Care home only
  • Provider: Southend Care Limited
  • Ownership: Private
  • Care Home ID: 17527
Residents Needs:
Old age, not falling within any other category, Dementia

Latest Inspection

This is the latest available inspection report for this service, carried out on 15th September 2009. CQC found this care home to be providing an Good service.

The inspector found no outstanding requirements from the previous inspection report, but made 1 statutory requirements (actions the home must comply with) as a result of this inspection.

For extracts, read the latest CQC inspection for Well House.

What the care home does well The home is well managed in the interests of the people who live there. The manager is competent and experienced and comments received back from people in surveys were complimentary about the way they manage the service. People are supported by a competent, stable staff team. Relatives of people living in the home spoke favourably about the way staff provide care. People`s health care needs are well met and there were good relationships between the home and health care professionals. There is a range of activities in place that are designed to meet people`s wishes and needs. The home encourages and promotes the involvement of family and friends. Relatives spoken with told us they are always made welcome and are consulted with and informed about their relative`s care. What has improved since the last inspection? There has been redecoration and refurbishment throughout the home as part of the ongoing programme of maintenance and redecoration, including people`s individual bedrooms. The recruitment practice has improved to ensure that all staff are Criminal Records Bureau (CRB) checked before commencing employment. What the care home could do better: They need to ensure that all staff are provided with training on safeguarding, this is to ensure that all staff have the necessary knowledge and skills to enable them to keep people safe. Inspecting for better lives Key inspection report Care homes for older people Name: Address: Well House Chestnut Way Brightlingsea Essex CO7 0UH     The quality rating for this care home is:   two star good service A quality rating is our assessment of how well a care home, agency or scheme is meeting the needs of the people who use it. We give a quality rating following a full assessment of the service. We call this a ‘key’ inspection. Lead inspector: Neal Cranmer     Date: 1 5 0 9 2 0 0 9 This is a report of an inspection where we looked at how well this care home is meeting the needs of people who use it. There is a summary of what we think this service does well, what they have improved on and, where it applies, what they need to do better. We use the national minimum standards to describe the outcomes that people should experience. National minimum standards are written by the Department of Health for each type of care service. After the summary there is more detail about our findings. The following table explains what you will see under each outcome area. Outcome area (for example Choice of home) These are the outcomes that people staying in care homes should experience. that people have said are important to them: They reflect the things This box tells you the outcomes that we will always inspect against when we do a key inspection. This box tells you any additional outcomes that we may inspect against when we do a key inspection. This is what people staying in this care home experience: Judgement: This box tells you our opinion of what we have looked at in this outcome area. We will say whether it is excellent, good, adequate or poor. Evidence: This box describes the information we used to come to our judgement. Copies of the National Minimum Standards – Care Homes for Older People can be found at www.dh.gov.uk or bought from The Stationery Office (TSO) PO Box 29, St Crispins, Duke Street, Norwich, NR3 1GN. Tel: 0870 600 5522. Online ordering from the Stationery Office is also available: www.tso.co.uk/bookshop The Commission for Social Care Inspection aims to: • • • • Put the people who use social care first Improve services and stamp out bad practice Be an expert voice on social care Practise what we preach in our own organisation Our duty to regulate social care services is set out in the Care Standards Act 2000. Care Homes for Older People Page 2 of 26 Reader Information Document Purpose Author Audience Further copies from Copyright Inspection report CSCI General public 0870 240 7535 (telephone order line) Copyright © (2010) Commission for Social Care Inspection (CSCI). This publication may be reproduced in whole or in part, free of charge, in any format or medium provided that it is not used for commercial gain. This consent is subject to the material being reproduced accurately and on proviso that it is not used in a derogatory manner or misleading context. The material should be acknowledged as CSCI copyright, with the title and date of publication of the document specified. www.cqc.org.uk Internet address Care Homes for Older People Page 3 of 26 Information about the care home Name of care home: Address: Well House Chestnut Way Brightlingsea Essex CO7 0UH 01206303311 01206306130 Telephone number: Fax number: Email address: Provider web address: Name of registered provider(s): Type of registration: Number of places registered: Conditions of registration: Category(ies) : Southend Care Limited care home 43 Number of places (if applicable): Under 65 Over 65 0 43 dementia old age, not falling within any other category Additional conditions: 43 0 The maximum number of service users who can be accommodated is: 43 The registered person may provide the following category of service only: Care home only - Code PC. to service users of the following gender: Either. whose primary care needs on admission to the home are within the following categories: Old age, not falling within any other category - Code OP. Dementia - Code DE. Date of last inspection Brief description of the care home Well House is a purpose built home for older people, situated in a residential area of Brightlingsea close to the town centre. Accommodation is all on one level and the home is divided into four units, each unit consisting of seven single bedrooms and one double bedroom. Each unit has its own lounge and dining area; there is an additional large communal lounge with a small sun lounge attached, and the home has secluded garden/courtyard areas outside. The home is registered to provide personal care for 43 Older People (over the age of 65), provides 24-hour personal care and support, and has appropriate equipment (e.g. mobile hoist, hand rails, etc.) to assist residents with limited mobility. Care Homes for Older People Page 4 of 26 Brief description of the care home Southend Care owns the home and the registered manager is Kerry Williams. The current scale of charges, as notified to the CSCI at the inspection of the 15th June 2007 is between £355:81 and £393:19 per week, with additional charges for personal items (toiletries, hairdresser, newspapers, chiropody, etc.). A copy of the most recent inspection report was displayed in the home, and a `Service Users? Guide? was available to prospective residents to inform them about the home. Care Homes for Older People Page 5 of 26 Summary This is an overview of what we found during the inspection. The quality rating for this care home is: Our judgement for each outcome: two star good service Choice of home Health and personal care Daily life and social activities Complaints and protection Environment Staffing Management and administration peterchart Poor Adequate Good Excellent How we did our inspection: The last inspection of the service was undertaken on the 15th of June 2007. A range of evidence was looked at when compiling this report. Documentary evidence was examined, such as care plans, rotas, menus and personnel files. The manager completed an Annual Quality Assurance Assessment, which is required by law to be completed by the service, with information about the home and sent it to us when requested. Throughout the report this document will be referred to as the AQAA. A Visit to the home was undertaken on the 15th of September 2009 and included a tour of the premises, discussions with people living in the home, the manager and members of the staff team. Observations of how members of staff interact and Care Homes for Older People Page 6 of 26 communicate with people living in the home have also been taken into account. On the day of the inspection we were given every assistance from the manager and the staff team. What the care home does well: What has improved since the last inspection? What they could do better: If you want to know what action the person responsible for this care home is taking following this report, you can contact them using the details set out on page 4. The report of this inspection is available from our website www.cqc.org.uk. You can get printed copies from enquiries@cqc.org.uk or by telephoning our order line –0870 240 7535. Care Homes for Older People Page 8 of 26 Details of our findings Contents Choice of home (standards 1 - 6) Health and personal care (standards 7 - 11) Daily life and social activities (standards 12 - 15) Complaints and protection (standards 16 - 18) Environment (standards 19 - 26) Staffing (standards 27 - 30) Management and administration (standards 31 - 38) Outstanding statutory requirements Requirements and recommendations from this inspection Care Homes for Older People Page 9 of 26 Choice of home These are the outcomes that people staying in care homes should experience. They reflect the things that people have said are important to them: People are confident that the care home can support them. This is because there is an accurate assessment of their needs that they, or people close to them, have been involved in. This tells the home all about them and the support they need. People who stay at the home only for intermediate care, have a clear assessment that includes a plan on what they hope for and want to achieve when they return home. People can decide whether the care home can meet their support and accommodation needs. This is because they, or people close to them, have been able to visit the home and have got full, clear, accurate and up to date information about the home. If they decide to stay in the home they know about their rights and responsibilities because there is an easy to understand contract or statement of terms and conditions between them and the care home that includes how much they will pay and what the home provides for the money. This is what people staying in this care home experience: Judgement: People using this service experience good quality outcomes in this area. We have made this judgement using a range of evidence, including a visit to this service. People can be confident that their assessed needs will be identified and met. Evidence: The manager told us in the AQAA, Potential residents are informed of all services that are provided and are given a brochure with details. The service has a document referred to as the Statement of Purpose this document provides prospective residents with a range of information about the home including; the qualifications and experience of the provider, responsible individual and the manager of the home. other information included details relating to staffing levels, the accommodation provided, the admission process, what the fees were for staying in the home including what was and was not covered by the fees. The document also provided information about the activities provided by the home. Reference was also made to how prospective residents or their representatives might raise a concern or Care Homes for Older People Page 10 of 26 Evidence: complaint should the needs arise. Six surveys were returned by residents, all of which confirmed that people felt they had been provided with enough information to enable them to decide if the home was the right place for them to move into. The manager told us in the AQAA, Before any respite or permanent admission a full needs assessment is carried out by trained staff to ensure the home is able to meet the needs of the resident, including social care and specialised needs. Through discussion with the manager on the day of the inspection, it was evident that there was a comprehensive assessment process in place to access the needs of anyone wishing to move in to the home and ensure they were able to meet the persons assessed needs. The manager spoke with confidence and knowledge about the importance of a good pre-admission assessment process. A sample of four care plans (including that of the person most recently admitted to the home) examined all contained pre-admission assessments. The assessments all contained a history of the individual as well as a current breakdown of their current needs. The assessment looked at the persons needs around mobility, nutrition, communication, personal hygiene, medication, skin care and sleep pattern. On the day of our inspection visit a new resident was observed being admitted to the home, during the admission we observed the manager being supportive to the resident and their relatives. Discussion later in the day with the relatives of this person indicated how well they felt the admission process had been handled. Where people are placed in the home by the local authority, there is also a COM5 assessment of the persons needs which is carried out by a representative of the placing authority. The manager told us in the AQAA, We have three rooms permanently assigned for short stay/ respite residents. During the course of our inspection we were able to speak to a resident who was staying in the home for a period of respite care. They confirmed that they usually received the same room whenever they stayed in the home, or if not one of two others that were available. Care Homes for Older People Page 11 of 26 Health and personal care These are the outcomes that people staying in care homes should experience. They reflect the things that people have said are important to them: People’s health, personal and social care needs are met. The home has a plan of care that the person, or someone close to them, has been involved in making. If they take medicine, they manage it themselves if they can. If they cannot manage their medicine, the care home supports them with it, in a safe way. People’s right to privacy is respected and the support they get from staff is given in a way that maintains their dignity. If people are approaching the end of their life, the care home will respect their choices and help them feel comfortable and secure. They, and people close to them, are reassured that their death will be handled with sensitivity, dignity and respect, and take account of their spiritual and cultural wishes. This is what people staying in this care home experience: Judgement: People using this service experience good quality outcomes in this area. We have made this judgement using a range of evidence, including a visit to this service. People using the service can expect their personal and health care needs to be identified and provided for in a way that they would wish. Evidence: The manager told us in the AQAA, We have a comprehensive care plan formulated from information in the pre-admission assessment, the care plan details personal history, health care needs and social care needs. On the day of the inspection a sample of four care plans were examined. The care plans identified the persons care need, the objective for the person and provided staff with a good level of guidance about how the person needed to be supported to enable their health and personal care needs to be met. Specific individual care plans examined included details of peoples sensory and communication needs, mobility, food and drink, personal hygiene needs. This range of care plans was developed from peoples assessed needs. Care Homes for Older People Page 12 of 26 Evidence: Peoples individual care files contained ample evidence that their health care needs were being well met. There were records being kept of appointments with and visits from a range of health care professionals including district nurses, chiropodists, opticians and dentists. There were records in place to show that peoples weight and fluid intake was being monitored on a regular basis. On the day of the inspection a member of staff was overheard arranging a home visit from the GP for a service user who was unwell. A visiting health care professional who was visiting the home on the day of our visit indicated that the home met peoples health care needs well. Discussion with a relative of one person living in the home indicated that they were always kept informed if their relative was unwell or had had a fall. Each person had a manual handling assessment in place that identified the factors that might have an impact on the persons manual handling needs. these included behavioral risk factors, physical risk factors and any identified handling constraints such as pain or skin conditions. The risk assessment went on to identify any necessary equipment required to enable the persons manual handling needs to be met. We observed that good practices were being followed by staff when supporting people with their moving and handling needs. Staff spoken with during the course of the inspection were knowledgeable about peoples moving and handling needs. On the day of the inspection the system for the storage, administration and recording of medication was examined and found to be robust. There was appropriate secure storage for medication including a controlled drugs cupboard. Medication Administration record (MAR) sheets examined were completed appropriately and records were well organised. Staff spoken with were aware of their responsibilities around following appropriate procedures when dealing with medication. Observation of interactions between staff and people living in the home were positive. People spoken with said that staff were always polite and respectful and always ensured that their privacy and dignity was maintained when supporting them with their personal care needs. Care Homes for Older People Page 13 of 26 Daily life and social activities These are the outcomes that people staying in care homes should experience. They reflect the things that people have said are important to them: Each person is treated as an individual and the care home is responsive to his or her race, culture, religion, age, disability, gender and sexual orientation. They are part of their local community. The care home supports people to follow personal interests and activities. People are able to keep in touch with family, friends and representatives. They are as independent as they can be, lead their chosen lifestyle and have the opportunity to make the most of their abilities. People have nutritious and attractive meals and snacks, at a time and place to suit them. There are no additional outcomes. This is what people staying in this care home experience: Judgement: People using this service experience good quality outcomes in this area. We have made this judgement using a range of evidence, including a visit to this service. People who live in the home can expect to be provided with a variety and choice in their daily lives and Peoples expectations and preferences with regard to their lifestyle are well met. Evidence: The manager told us in the AQAA, Daily activities are available such as baking, gardening and games. Also outside entertainment is arranged every few months and religious services are held in the main lounge. Care plans examined contained details of activities that people had taken part in, such as games and quizzes. Responses in surveys returned indicated that the home does arrange activities that people can take part in if they choose to. An activity plan is posted weekly on each unit, sampling of which indicated a range of activities being available to people to take part in if they so wished, the range of activities included: arts and craft, sing-a-long, music and movement, target ball, hand and nail care for the ladies and holy communion. An activities notice board was displayed in the main hall way with Care Homes for Older People Page 14 of 26 Evidence: photographs of people on a recent trip to the coast. The home has a small library facility which is replenished on a monthly basis by a visiting mobile library service. On the day of the inspection people were observed sitting around in quiet areas of the home reading books that they said they had taken from the library. The manager told us in the AQAA, We have no set times for visitors and they are invited to join in with any activities and people are asked where they would like to receive their visitors. The home has an open door policy on the receiving of visitors. Sampling of the homes visitors book showed that relatives were visiting the home on a regular basis. discussion with people living in the home confirmed that they were able to choose where to receive their visitors. One visiting relative said that they were always made to feel welcome and were always provided with refreshments. People living in the home said that the meals were good and that they were always provided with a choice. To enable people to make choices staff go around each morning with a menu to ask people what they would like. People spoken with said that there were always two choices available at each mealtime. A record of peoples likes and dislikes was seen to be kept in each of the care plans examined. Food stocks were sampled and were found to be adequate to meet the needs of the number of people living in the home. The menus that were looked at were varied and nutritious and provided people with a balanced diet. Peoples whose meals needed to be provided to them in a pureed format to enable them to eat safely were seen to receive their meals individually presented to ensure that their meals taste and texture was preserved. During our inspection we discreetly observed the lunchtime meal on one unit (Hastings), the meal was seen to be nicely presented and staff were seen and heard informing and reminding people of what their meal was. Staff were observed to be attentive to peoples needs and the meal was taken in a pleasant relaxed atmosphere. People spoken with said how nice the meal was. Care Homes for Older People Page 15 of 26 Complaints and protection These are the outcomes that people staying in care homes should experience. They reflect the things that people have said are important to them: If people have concerns with their care, they or people close to them know how to complain. Any concern is looked into and action taken to put things right. The care home safeguards people from abuse and neglect and takes action to follow up any allegations. People’s legal rights are protected, including being able to vote in elections. This is what people staying in this care home experience: Judgement: People using this service experience good quality outcomes in this area. We have made this judgement using a range of evidence, including a visit to this service. People using the service can expect their concerns to be listened to and acted upon as stated in the homes complaints and safeguarding procedures. Evidence: The manager told us in the AQAA, All complaints are taken seriously and are recorded and dealt with as soon as possible. A copy of the complaints policy was posted on the wall in the main foyer of the building. Reference to the homes complaints policy was also contained in the homes Service Users Guide. The home retains a complaints log for the recording of any complaints received. The AQAA stated that two complaints had been received in respect of the home, one of which had been resolved within the stated time scale, the remaining complaint was still under going investigation. It was evident from discussion with the manager that the ethos of the home was to take every concern seriously and deal with issues as they arose to ensure that people were happy. People living in the home spoken with indicated that they knew how or to who they should speak to in the event that they were unhappy. These comments were also supported positively by the responses from surveys. Care Homes for Older People Page 16 of 26 Evidence: The manager told us in the AQAA, All staff have safeguarding training and are made fully aware of the whistle blowing policy. The home had in place policies and procedures which were designed to provide staff with the necessary level of information that they required to enable them to understand their responsibilities around keeping people safe. There is a robust recruitment process in place that ensure that relevant checks are carried out before someone is employed. The registered manager stated that safeguarding (previously known as POVA or adult protection) is discussed with all staff during their induction. The manager had a good understanding and knowledge of their responsibilities around safeguarding. However sampling of training records and further discussion with the manager indicated that only 50 of the staff team had received training in safeguarding. Discussion with a number of staff during our inspection indicated that they did have a good understanding of their responsibilities around safeguarding. However provision must be made to ensure that all staff have the same level of skill and knowledge, to ensure that people are kept safe. Care Homes for Older People Page 17 of 26 Environment These are the outcomes that people staying in care homes should experience. They reflect the things that people have said are important to them: People stay in a safe and well-maintained home that is homely, clean, pleasant and hygienic. People stay in a home that has enough space and facilities for them to lead the life they choose and to meet their needs. The home makes sure they have the right specialist equipment that encourages and promotes their independence. Their room feels like their own, it is comfortable and they feel safe when they use it. This is what people staying in this care home experience: Judgement: People using this service experience good quality outcomes in this area. We have made this judgement using a range of evidence, including a visit to this service. People can enjoy living in an environment that suits their lifestyle and which is homely, well maintained and clean. Evidence: The manager told us in the AQAA, The communal areas are decorated and furnished in a homely fashion and there is a large communal lounge where people can meet for social events. Communal areas were homely and the furnishings and fittings were of a good quality and were well maintained. Peoples individual rooms were personalised with a wide range of possessions, including photographs, ornaments and other memorabilia. People spoken with said they were very happy with their rooms. The manager told us in the AQAA, Rooms are cleaned daily and hygiene is strictly monitored and staff are aware of infection control guidelines. Liquid soap and paper towels were provided in toilet and bathroom areas so that good practices could be followed around hand washing. On the day of the inspection staff practices around infection control such as hand washing were observed to be good. The home employs house keepers who have responsibility for all cleaning tasks. On Care Homes for Older People Page 18 of 26 Evidence: the day of our inspection the standard of cleanliness throughout the home was found to be good and everywhere was fresh and odour free. There are comprehensive policies and procedures in place relating to infection control. It was noted that staff were wearing aprons and gloves when carrying out cleaning duties. The home has a range of communal areas where people can choose to go and spend quiet times, including secluded courtyard areas, one of the people spoken with said how much they had enjoyed sitting outside during the recent bout of good weather. Care Homes for Older People Page 19 of 26 Staffing These are the outcomes that people staying in care homes should experience. They reflect the things that people have said are important to them: People have safe and appropriate support as there are enough competent staff on duty at all times. They have confidence in the staff at the home because checks have been done to make sure that they are suitable to care for them. Their needs are met and they are cared for by staff who get the relevant training and support from their managers. There are no additional outcomes. This is what people staying in this care home experience: Judgement: People using this service experience good quality outcomes in this area. We have made this judgement using a range of evidence, including a visit to this service. People living in the home are cared for by a competent staff team who can meet their care needs. Evidence: The manager told us in the AQAA, We provide fully trained staff both day and night and the ratio of staff is determined by the residential forum. All staff undergo an induction training period of twelve weeks, this includes training in moving and handling, fire procedures and health and safety. Records examined confirmed that staffing levels were appropriate for the size of the home and the needs of the people living there. On a typical shift there were seven carers, and a senior carer on shift. At night there are three waking staff to deal with peoples night care needs. On the day of the inspection the staffing levels were observed to be good and their needs were being attended to promptly The staffing levels enabled the staff to care for people in a relaxed manner. Staff spoken with on the day of the inspection were able to demonstrate a good knowledge of good care practices and of the specific needs of the people living in the home. Care Homes for Older People Page 20 of 26 Evidence: When ask in the surveys What the home does well responses included; Provide good care and attention. The manager told us in the AQAA, Our recruitment policy ensures that two references and Criminal Records Bureau checks (CRB) and Protection of Vulnerable Adults (POVA) checks are obtained before new staff commence working. A sample of four personnel records were examined (all of which were of staff who had been newly appointed into the home, within the past six months). All contained appropriate documentation as required by regulations including proof of identity, two written references, an appropriately completed application form and an enhanced Criminal Records Bureau check (CRB). Personnel records examined contained evidence that staff had undergone a formal induction when they had commenced working in the home. The manager told us in the AQAA, All staff are offered National Vocational Qualification (NVQ) training and we provide other training such as dementia, food hygiene, infection control and first aid. Staff spoken with during the inspection said that access to staff training was generally quite good. However record keeping in relation to staff training was quite poor. The records presented showed that staff had received training in manual handling, fire awareness and first aid. The manager also provided a training matrix which was in the process of being designed to enable staffs training to be tracked. This matrix was however in the early stages of its development and gave very little indication of what training staff had or had not received up to the point of the inspection. Care Homes for Older People Page 21 of 26 Management and administration These are the outcomes that people staying in care homes should experience. They reflect the things that people have said are important to them: People have confidence in the care home because it is led and managed appropriately. People control their own money and choose how they spend it. If they or someone close to them cannot manage their money, it is managed by the care home in their best interests. The environment is safe for people and staff because appropriate health and safety practices are carried out. People get the right support from the care home because the manager runs it appropriately with an open approach that makes them feel valued and respected. The people staying at the home are safeguarded because it follows clear financial and accounting procedures, keeps records appropriately and ensures their staff understand the way things should be done. They get the right care because the staff are supervised and supported by their managers. This is what people staying in this care home experience: Judgement: People using this service experience good quality outcomes in this area. We have made this judgement using a range of evidence, including a visit to this service. People can expect to be cared for in an environment that is well managed. Evidence: The manager told us in the AQAA, We ensure that people are consulted with about their health and personal care, interests and preferences. Also the home carries out regular quality assurance to ensure the health, safety and welfare of service users and staff alike. The registered manager has been in post for 3-4 years and has 15 years previous experience of care of the elderly. The registered manager holds the registered managers award in management and care, and does other periodic training to enable them to stay current and up to date. The AQAA submitted by the manager prior to the inspection was completed to a good standard and contained appropriate information about all aspects of the home and the Care Homes for Older People Page 22 of 26 Evidence: service it provides. other evidence examined as part of the inspection process confirmed that most of the information provided in the AQAA was accurate. An annual quality audit is carried out by an external organisation, the audit is based on the National Minimum Standards. To help inform the audit surveys are sent out to service users, relatives and staff. Regulation 26 visits (these are visits that the provider is required to make on a monthly basis by regulation) are carried out monthly, sampling of reports following these visits indicated tat time was spent talking to service users during the visits. Copies of reports following the visits were provided to the home and were available for inspection. Discussion with people living in the home indicated that the manager did spend time consulting with them about issues relating to the running of the home. One comment received included; The manager runs the home very well, in our best interests. Money held on behalf of people living in the home was safely locked away in the office safe, with only team leaders and the registered manager having access. Sampling of records showed that there was a basic audit trail of expenditure and income in place. All three of the records sampled were found to be in order. Records relating to the health and safety of individuals living and working in the home were well maintained with appropriate training undertaken by staff in safe working practices. The testing of equipment and servicing records seen were all up to date and current. It was evident from the tour of the home that the premises and grounds were well maintained. it was evident from the staff files sampled that there was a robust system in place for the supervision of staff. The supervision process included formal one-to-one supervision and observation of practice. On the day of the inspection staff spoken with felt well supported. Care Homes for Older People Page 23 of 26 Are there any outstanding requirements from the last inspection? Yes £ No R Outstanding statutory requirements These are requirements that were set at the previous inspection, but have still not been met. They say what the registered person had to do to meet the Care Standards Act 2000, Care Homes Regulations 2001 and the National Minimum Standards. No. Standard Regulation Requirement Timescale for action Care Homes for Older People Page 24 of 26 Requirements and recommendations from this inspection: Immediate requirements: These are immediate requirements that were set on the day we visited this care home. The registered person had to meet these within 48 hours. No. Standard Regulation Requirement Timescale for action Statutory requirements These requirements set out what the registered person must do to meet the Care Standards Act 2000, Care Homes Regulations 2001 and the National Minimum Standards. The registered person(s) must do this within the timescales we have set. No. Standard Regulation Requirement Timescale for action 1 18 13 The registered person must ensure that all staff receive training on safeguarding vulnerable adults. This is to ensure that people are supported by a staff team who are knowledgeable about ensuring that people are kept safe. 31/12/2009 Recommendations These recommendations are taken from the best practice described in the National Minimum Standards and the registered person(s) should consider them as a way of improving their service. No. Refer to Standard Good Practice Recommendations Care Homes for Older People Page 25 of 26 Helpline: Telephone: 03000 616161 or Textphone: or Email: enquiries@cqc.org.uk Web: www.cqc.org.uk We want people to be able to access this information. If you would like a summary in a different format or language please contact our helpline or go to our website. Copyright © (2010) Commission for Social Care Inspection (CSCI). This publication may be reproduced in whole or in part, free of charge, in any format or medium provided that it is not used for commercial gain. This consent is subject to the material being reproduced accurately and on proviso that it is not used in a derogatory manner or misleading context. The material should be acknowledged as CSCI copyright, with the title and date of publication of the document specified. Care Homes for Older People Page 26 of 26 - Please note that this information is included on www.bestcarehome.co.uk under license from the regulator. Re-publishing this information is in breach of the terms of use of that website. Discrete codes and changes have been inserted throughout the textual data shown on the site that will provide incontrovertable proof of copying in the event this information is re-published on other websites. The policy of www.bestcarehome.co.uk is to use all legal avenues to pursue such offenders, including recovery of costs. You have been warned!

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