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Care Home: Chessington

  • 50 Marlpit Lane Seaton Devon EX12 2HN
  • Tel: 0129720383
  • Fax: 0129720383

Chessington care home is part of the company Voyagers Ltd. It is registered to provide support and personal care to three people who have a learning disability. The home is situated in a pleasant, quiet area of Seaton but is close to the local amenities. The house has three bedrooms, one of which is on the ground floor. There is one bathroom upstairs and a separate toilet downstairs. There is a pleasant lounge adjoined to a sunny conservatory at the front of the house and a large kitchen/dining area to the rear of the property. There is ample parking in the driveway. The home`s fees range from £1500 per week with no additional charges. These fees are negotiated on an individual basis depending on needs. The home informs residents` relatives and representatives when an inspection has taken place. A copy of the report is sent to all parties and the report is explained to service users.

  • Latitude: 50.707000732422
    Longitude: -3.0810000896454
  • Manager: Jonathan Mark Higgins
  • Price p/w: £1500
  • UK
  • Total Capacity: 3
  • Type: Care home only
  • Provider: Mr Jonathan Mark Higgins
  • Ownership: Private
  • Care Home ID: 4436
Residents Needs:
Learning disability

Previous Inspections

This may not be the latest inspection for this service as we are having techinical problems updating from CQC - please check directly on the regulators website for the most recent report; bestcarehome hopes to be back to regular updates shortly.

For extracts, read the latest CQC inspection for Chessington.

CARE HOME ADULTS 18-65 Chessington 50 Marlpit Lane Seaton Devon EX12 2HN Lead Inspector Rachel Doyle Key Unannounced Inspection 8th April 2008 10:30 Chessington DS0000061472.V361904.R02.S.doc Version 5.2 Page 1 The Commission for Social Care Inspection aims to: • • • • Put the people who use social care first Improve services and stamp out bad practice Be an expert voice on social care Practise what we preach in our own organisation Reader Information Document Purpose Author Audience Further copies from Copyright Inspection Report CSCI General Public 0870 240 7535 (telephone order line) This report is copyright Commission for Social Care Inspection (CSCI) and may only be used in its entirety. Extracts may not be used or reproduced without the express permission of CSCI www.csci.org.uk Internet address Chessington DS0000061472.V361904.R02.S.doc Version 5.2 Page 2 This is a report of an inspection to assess whether services are meeting the needs of people who use them. The legal basis for conducting inspections is the Care Standards Act 2000 and the relevant National Minimum Standards for this establishment are those for Care Homes for Adults 18-65. They can be found at www.dh.gov.uk or obtained from The Stationery Office (TSO) PO Box 29, St Crispins, Duke Street, Norwich, NR3 1GN. Tel: 0870 600 5522. Online ordering: www.tso.co.uk/bookshop This report is a public document. Extracts may not be used or reproduced without the prior permission of the Commission for Social Care Inspection. Chessington DS0000061472.V361904.R02.S.doc Version 5.2 Page 3 SERVICE INFORMATION Name of service Chessington Address 50 Marlpit Lane Seaton Devon EX12 2HN 01297 20383 01297 20383 voyagersltd@aol.com www.voyagersltd.co.uk Voyagers Ltd Mr Jonathan Mark Higgins Julie Farrell Care Home 3 Telephone number Fax number Email address Provider Web address Name of registered provider(s)/company (if applicable) Name of registered manager (if applicable) Type of registration No. of places registered (if applicable) Category(ies) of Learning disability (3) registration, with number of places Chessington DS0000061472.V361904.R02.S.doc Version 5.2 Page 4 SERVICE INFORMATION Conditions of registration: 1. The care home may provide accommodation together with personal care for up to three service users with a Learning Disability, between the ages of 18 and 65 13th April 2007 Date of last inspection Brief Description of the Service: Chessington care home is part of the company Voyagers Ltd. It is registered to provide support and personal care to three people who have a learning disability. The home is situated in a pleasant, quiet area of Seaton but is close to the local amenities. The house has three bedrooms, one of which is on the ground floor. There is one bathroom upstairs and a separate toilet downstairs. There is a pleasant lounge adjoined to a sunny conservatory at the front of the house and a large kitchen/dining area to the rear of the property. There is ample parking in the driveway. The home’s fees range from £1500 per week with no additional charges. These fees are negotiated on an individual basis depending on needs. The home informs residents’ relatives and representatives when an inspection has taken place. A copy of the report is sent to all parties and the report is explained to service users. Chessington DS0000061472.V361904.R02.S.doc Version 5.2 Page 5 SUMMARY This is an overview of what the inspector found during the inspection. The quality rating for this service is 2 star. This means the people who use this service experience good quality outcomes. This key inspection took place over four and a half hours on a weekday. The provider was present throughout and the manager who was about to undergo our registration process. Both were very helpful. We were able to speak to 2 staff members and spend time observing care. One person living at the Home has limited verbal communication skills and was unable to participate fully in the inspection. Another person living at the Home was out in town for most of the inspection but was able to talk to us briefly on their return. Prior to the inspection the provider completed a questionnaire, which provides information about the people living at the home, staffing, fees and confirms that necessary policies and procedures are in place. This information helps the commission to prepare for the inspection, send out surveys to appropriate people and helps the commission form a judgement on how well the service is run. When the inspection took place, surveys were left for the people living at the home. One was returned. This was positive. They were also sent to staff, one was returned, and comment cards were sent to professionals who are connected to the home. During the inspection we “case tracked” the people living at the home. This means we spoke with them, made observations, spoke with staff and read records, starting from the admissions process through to the present. Medication practices were looked at and a tour of the peoples’ bedrooms took place. We also looked around the home and inspected other records. These included, the fire safety information, staff training records, menus, quality assurance records and three recruitment files. What the service does well: The atmosphere on the day of the inspection was relaxed and cheerful. Two staff members were fairly new but had good knowledge about the needs of the people living at the Home. Staff files confirmed that staff are recruited appropriately and safely and that good induction training has started. The staff team is more stable and staff are supported and guided with some good information in people’s files. People’s health needs are well met, monitored and are reviewed regularly with health professionals. Chessington DS0000061472.V361904.R02.S.doc Version 5.2 Page 6 The home is situated in a pleasant location close to local amenities. People living at the Home enjoy using local facilities for shopping, cafes, seafront walks, pubs and so on. On the day of the inspection one person went to a café and another was about to go for a walk as it was a lovely day. One person said that they liked the house and staff saying ‘they’re my mates’ and that they decide where and when they like to go. The house is homely and decorated and furnished to a good standard. Both people living there had personalised their rooms with creative help from staff. Measures have been taken to protect people’s health, welfare and safety, through appropriate policies and procedures, financial practices, care plans, some risk assessments and some staff training, further work on risk assessments is needed to fully protect everyone. The provider has systems in place that reviews the quality of services provided. What has improved since the last inspection? What they could do better: Chessington DS0000061472.V361904.R02.S.doc Version 5.2 Page 7 Where decisions are made on behalf of people, but in their best interests, records should be kept of when and who was involved in such decisions. Specialist advice should continue to be sought about finding methods of communicating with people with limited communication skills and enabling them to communicate with staff when they are unhappy. The home should continue to find specialist training for staff that helps them to meet peoples’ needs. A full environmental risk assessment of the premises and outside area should be undertaken and regularly reviewed to ensure that people remain safe. There are no requirements made following this inspection, which is commendable. Please contact the provider for advice of actions taken in response to this inspection. The report of this inspection is available from enquiries@csci.gsi.gov.uk or by contacting your local CSCI office. The summary of this inspection report can be made available in other formats on request. Chessington DS0000061472.V361904.R02.S.doc Version 5.2 Page 8 DETAILS OF INSPECTOR FINDINGS CONTENTS Choice of Home (Standards 1–5) Individual Needs and Choices (Standards 6-10) Lifestyle (Standards 11-17) Personal and Healthcare Support (Standards 18-21) Concerns, Complaints and Protection (Standards 22-23) Environment (Standards 24-30) Staffing (Standards 31-36) Conduct and Management of the Home (Standards 37 – 43) Scoring of Outcomes Statutory Requirements Identified During the Inspection Chessington DS0000061472.V361904.R02.S.doc Version 5.2 Page 9 Choice of Home The intended outcomes for Standards 1 – 5 are: 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. Prospective service users have the information they need to make an informed choice about where to live. Prospective users’ individual aspirations and needs are assessed. Prospective service users know that the home that they will choose will meet their needs and aspirations. Prospective service users have an opportunity to visit and to “test drive” the home. Each service user has an individual written contract or statement of terms and conditions with the home. The Commission consider Standard 2 the key standard to be inspected. JUDGEMENT – we looked at outcomes for the following standard(s): 2 Quality in this outcome area is good. This judgement has been made using available evidence including a visit to this service. The admission process provides staff with the information they require to ensure people’s needs can be met. EVIDENCE: There have been no new admissions since the last two inspections, the current people living at the Home have lived together for 3 years and there is one vacancy. Excellent detailed information is available in one person’s file. This has helped the provider ensure staff are aware of the person’s history and needs and this has been used when developing the care plan. The provider use their own admission forms to ensure that additional information from other sources is correct. Chessington DS0000061472.V361904.R02.S.doc Version 5.2 Page 10 Individual Needs and Choices The intended outcomes for Standards 6 – 10 are: 6. 7. 8. 9. 10. Service users know their assessed and changing needs and personal goals are reflected in their individual Plan. Service users make decisions about their lives with assistance as needed. Service users are consulted on, and participate in, all aspects of life in the home. Service users are supported to take risks as part of an independent lifestyle. Service users know that information about them is handled appropriately, and that their confidences are kept. The Commission considers Standards 6, 7 and 9 the key standards to be inspected. JUDGEMENT – we looked at outcomes for the following standard(s): 6, 7, 9 Quality in this outcome area is good. This judgement has been made using available evidence including a visit to this service. Care planning is very good meaning that staff understand peoples’ needs. Decisions made on behalf of people are done so in consultation with others but record keeping in relation to this and some risk assessments need some improvement. This means there is no evidence showing who was involved, what was agreed and when. EVIDENCE: Care plans included very good and detailed information about how staff were to meet peoples needs. They focussed on person centred care and encouraged people to participate in decision-making. The manager said how they tried to encourage good behaviour but that staff were not judgemental. There is a knowledge file and House journal to give staff additional information about relevant medical conditions. Chessington DS0000061472.V361904.R02.S.doc Version 5.2 Page 11 Monthly reports are written describing the progress made with each person living at the home. The reviews did not necessarily relate to the information in the care plans, but did provide good information on how people were progressing and were written in a person centred way. Copies of these were sent to care managers. More detailed reviews are also held with care manager, relatives and the person being cared for. The manager said that these are often difficult as the care managers didn’t always attend, which made advocacy a problem. They will look into providing an advocate for one person who may give positive responses in case they are asked to leave. Some decisions are made on behalf of the people living in the home. Some decisions are made in their best interests but may be viewed as being restrictive or invading their privacy or freedom of movement. Some issues discussed during the previous inspection have been addressed. However, a listening device is used in person’s bedroom because of their health needs. The providers said they have discussed this with the care manager and a member of a “Good Practice Committee”, who have agreed with its use. No record has been kept of these discussions. This would help ensure there is evidence that such decisions are discussed, when they came to an agreement and the named people involved. Assessments on areas of risk have been completed. Some of these assessments were good and provided staff with good guidance. However some other information did not always provide enough detail to ensure people remain safe. For example some information described the areas of risk but did not always say what would happen if the risk was not reduced, or guide staff fully on what to do to reduce it. The Home does not allow open access to the outside space and the conservatory door and front door have keypads. One person has to ask staff to leave the Home and the other person is unable to access the area unaided. This decision needs to be reassessed to look at how proportionate the risks and benefits to one person are or whether staff supervision is the solution. If the outside space poses risks these should be identified and minimised as much as possible. Chessington DS0000061472.V361904.R02.S.doc Version 5.2 Page 12 Lifestyle The intended outcomes for Standards 11 - 17 are: 11. 12. 13. 14. 15. 16. 17. Service users have opportunities for personal development. Service users are able to take part in age, peer and culturally appropriate activities. Service users are part of the local community. Service users engage in appropriate leisure activities. Service users have appropriate personal, family and sexual relationships. Service users’ rights are respected and responsibilities recognised in their daily lives. Service users are offered a healthy diet and enjoy their meals and mealtimes. The Commission considers Standards 12, 13, 15, 16 and 17 the key standards to be inspected. JUDGEMENT – we looked at outcomes for the following standard(s): 12, 13, 15, 16, 17 Quality in this outcome area is good. This judgement has been made using available evidence including a visit to this service. People are supported to make some choices about their lifestyles through using the local community, taking part in appropriate activities and maintaining relationships with families and friends. People benefit from balanced meals, which are tailored to meet their complex preferences. EVIDENCE: On the day of the inspection, one person was out having a drink in a café in town on their own and another person was about to go out for a walk with staff. The manager said how one person loves ‘the wind in their hair’ and they try to go out as much as possible. The Home encourages families to visit and escort one person to a peer group once a week, which they enjoy. Other activities include swimming, horse riding, pampering sessions and music. Chessington DS0000061472.V361904.R02.S.doc Version 5.2 Page 13 The providers have looked at different types of communication with one person, who has complex needs, by using photographs, pictures and some signs. Staff were able to show us objects of reference and photographs that they use to try to understand this persons’ wishes. The manager is currently devising a comprehensive list of body language signals to ensure that a wider picture of this persons’ wishes is clear for staff. Staff were also able to give detailed examples of how they communicate with this person such as noticing that they wanted to sit somewhere particular or lifting a foot to show their shoe is uncomfortable. This information should be recorded as soon as possible. Discussions again took place about the benefit of using a speech and language therapist to ensure the appropriate method of communication is used and the manager said that they would follow this up. Meals are discussed each day rather than using a menu as there are only two people living at the Home with different nutritional preferences. The manager was able to discuss peoples’ dietary histories at length. The Home has worked to improve their nutritional intake and on admission this was poor due to habits gained prior to admission. For example one person used to only eat bacon sandwiches. Fruit and vegetables are introduced slowly and in creative ways. She said that they used to have a board to which new foods that one person would now eat were added. Now they eat a wider range. One person was seen to be gently encouraged to eat and they were able to get up and wander about as they wanted in between. The manager said that food is not portioned but that it is just divided up for ease of freezing and that people are able to have seconds as they want. One person is able to help with choosing food and shopping. They also visit the farm shop to choose fresh fruit and vegetables. Staff arrived during the inspection having been shopping and they discussed how they would try brown bread but had bought an alternative if people did not like it. Prior to the shop the cupboards were almost empty and it would be good practice to ensure that there is always a good amount of food to enable proper choice of food at all times. This was commented on by a staff member. Snacks that people like are also available for people to have when they want. One staff member commented that sometimes a lot of the food is the cheaper option and the Home should ensure that this is not always the case, focussing on quality food in the main. The manager said that they have tried contacting a community dietician for nutritional advice but had not heard from them. It was recommended that the Home keep a record of any attempts to contact health professionals and their responses. A trainer was due to arrive that day from Safer Food Better Business. One person said that they had no worries about the food and they often enjoyed eating out too. The other person appeared happy eating their lunch. Chessington DS0000061472.V361904.R02.S.doc Version 5.2 Page 14 Personal and Healthcare Support The intended outcomes for Standards 18 - 21 are: 18. 19. 20. 21. Service users receive personal support in the way they prefer and require. Service users’ physical and emotional health needs are met. Service users retain, administer and control their own medication where appropriate, and are protected by the home’s policies and procedures for dealing with medicines. The ageing, illness and death of a service user are handled with respect and as the individual would wish. The Commission considers Standards 18, 19, and 20 the key standards to be inspected. JUDGEMENT – we looked at outcomes for the following standard(s): 18, 19, 20 Quality in this outcome area is good. This judgement has been made using available evidence including a visit to this service. Peoples’ dignity and privacy is respected. Health and personal care needs are well met and monitored. EVIDENCE: Health care needs were well met with good input from the multidisciplinary team, including psychiatrist, psychologist and the chiropodist. One person is booked for a hospital appointment and the care plans detail exactly how staff should assist or encourage people to keep healthy. Reviews and monitoring take place and other intimate health needs are well documented and privacy taken into account. The manager was able to discuss in detail how the health and positive behaviour of both people living at the Home had improvements since their admission. People are prompted with daily life skills and encouraged to look after themselves. Health advice such as from the chiropodist was clearly recorded in the care plans and staff were taking appropriate action using this information. Mental health aspects are also well documented and people have a regular one to one session with staff to enable them to express Chessington DS0000061472.V361904.R02.S.doc Version 5.2 Page 15 what they want in private, which is recorded. For one person this can be at any time. A District Nurse had visited the Home that morning to provide regular nursing care. Both people at the Home have visited the dentist and the optician visits the Home. Staff told us how one person had been able to be involved in choosing glasses. One person said that staff supported them to maintain their independence as much as possible. They gave examples of how they were guided with their personal care and said staff were kind and caring in how they provided the guidance. The people living in the home are unable to manage their own medication. Consent has been obtained from one person for the home to administer and manage their medicines. Medication is supplied in liquids, boxes and bottles. It is kept in a locked cupboard in the kitchen. One person takes some medicines in liquid from, by mouth, through a syringe. All staff who administer medicines have received training and are about to have refreshers. On the day of the inspection, the medication cupboard was tidy and medication clearly labelled, mostly a blister pack system is used. Medication is dispensed at the time of administering and signed by the appropriate staff member. The medication policy has been updated with clearer instructions. Chessington DS0000061472.V361904.R02.S.doc Version 5.2 Page 16 Concerns, Complaints and Protection The intended outcomes for Standards 22 – 23 are: 22. 23. Service users feel their views are listened to and acted on. Service users are protected from abuse, neglect and self-harm. The Commission considers Standards 22, and 23 the key standards to be inspected. JUDGEMENT – we looked at outcomes for the following standard(s): 22, 23 Quality in this outcome area is good. This judgement has been made using available evidence including a visit to this service. People living at the home are assured they are listened to and complaints are dealt with appropriately. There are systems in place to ensure people are protected from abuse. EVIDENCE: One person living at the home said they felt they were listened to and any worries or concerns were dealt with. They said that they would be quite happy to talk to any of the staff and the manager. The manager is looking into providing an advocate for this person to ensure that their true feelings are able to be communicated. However, another person living at the home with limited verbal communication needs has no formal way to express if they are unhappy. The providers felt they and the staff knew the person well enough to understand when they were unhappy and are devising more detailed information so that all staff know what their body language may mean. This person has little contact with family but the staff try to involve the care manager although this has proved difficult. Staff have received training on abuse awareness and were able to describe various types of abuse and what to do should they suspect it. Information received from the provider prior to the inspection indicated that all staff had received training on abuse awareness including work on different scenarios. New staff receive information as part of their induction on abuse awareness and one newer staff member confirmed this. The home has a copy of the local Chessington DS0000061472.V361904.R02.S.doc Version 5.2 Page 17 Alerters’ guide to ensure staff have information on how to report abuse and the manager was aware how to do this. People’s finances are managed well with good records. A relative has power of attorney for one person; monies are paid into a bank account for the provider to access on behalf of that person. The provider keeps receipts of all monies spent. The providers act as Trustees with a building society account for the other person living at the home. Chessington DS0000061472.V361904.R02.S.doc Version 5.2 Page 18 Environment The intended outcomes for Standards 24 – 30 are: 24. 25. 26. 27. 28. 29. 30. Service users live in a homely, comfortable and safe environment. Service users’ bedrooms suit their needs and lifestyles. Service users’ bedrooms promote their independence. Service users’ toilets and bathrooms provide sufficient privacy and meet their individual needs. Shared spaces complement and supplement service users’ individual rooms. Service users have the specialist equipment they require to maximise their independence. The home is clean and hygienic. The Commission considers Standards 24, and 30 the key standards to be inspected. JUDGEMENT – we looked at outcomes for the following standard(s): 24, 30 Quality in this outcome area is good. This judgement has been made using available evidence including a visit to this service. People are provided with clean, safe and comfortable surroundings that meet their needs. EVIDENCE: The home is decorated and furnished to a good standard. One person uses a ground floor bedroom to help meet their needs. Bedrooms are large, bright and airy and furnished to peoples’ taste and preferences. Staff have been creative in helping to personalise their rooms. One person said that they liked their room. The home has a large lounge, light conservatory, downstairs toilet, kitchen / dining room. The bathroom with shower is on the second level. The house has a homely atmosphere and people seemed relaxed in their surroundings. Chessington DS0000061472.V361904.R02.S.doc Version 5.2 Page 19 The Home was clean and laundry is done regularly. There was plenty of soap and hand towels available and care plans also encouraged people to remain safe from infection in a person centred way. The Home has a maintenance programme although it is noted that the Home is in rented premises which means that the Provider must communicate with the landlord. The company are currently looking for larger premises in the area to enable people to have more space. Chessington DS0000061472.V361904.R02.S.doc Version 5.2 Page 20 Staffing The intended outcomes for Standards 31 – 36 are: 31. 32. 33. 34. 35. 36. Service users benefit from clarity of staff roles and responsibilities. Service users are supported by competent and qualified staff. Service users are supported by an effective staff team. Service users are supported and protected by the home’s recruitment policy and practices. Service users’ individual and joint needs are met by appropriately trained staff. Service users benefit from well supported and supervised staff. The Commission considers Standards 32, 34 and 35 the key standards to be inspected. JUDGEMENT – we looked at outcomes for the following standard(s): 32, 34, 35, 36 Quality in this outcome area is good. This judgement has been made using available evidence including a visit to this service. People in the home are supported by enough caring, skilled and competent staff to meet their needs. Recruitment practices ensure that people are protected. EVIDENCE: The manager has been ensuring that all staff have formal supervision sessions. Good records were seen of these and included looking at staff competency. She gets feedback from the National Vocational Qualification (NVQ) tutor on their work to inform these sessions. There are 13 staff employed in total including 4 male staff. Eight staff are doing NVQ level2, 1 is doing NVQ3. The home provides 2 carers on duty at all times. This means because one person living at the home is more independent and goes out on their own, two to one support can be provided for the other person, which is important on outings away from the home. This person was about to go out for a walk with two carers. At night the 2 carers “sleep in”. Chessington DS0000061472.V361904.R02.S.doc Version 5.2 Page 21 The providers said they came to the home regularly and were also available by telephone. The Home are starting to have staff meetings and minute them now that the staff team is more stable. Staff records showed that new staff have received induction training and supervision where care practices are beginning to be discussed. The provider said and indicated in the information provided to the commission prior to the inspection, that staff have received training on, Epilepsy, First Aid, Safe Handling of Food and Safe Medicine and Protection of Vulnerable Adults. The manager said they hope to arrange training Total Communication, Autism and manual handling in the near future. At present none of the staff have any specialist training in the field of Learning Disability such as Breakaway or Gentle Teaching although their knowledge of how to care for the people living at the Home is good and well grounded in good practice principles. However, it is good practice to keep up to date with current research and practices in this field. The manager said that they would seek out training in this area. Three recruitment files were looked at and all contained the necessary information to keep people safe. It would be good practice to make it clear in which capacity all references were from. The providers said people who live at the home form part of the interview panel. This ensures they are involved in the recruitment of new staff and gives them a choice of will be supporting and caring for them. The providers said that the person with limited verbal communication indicates clearly people they do not like or want by ignoring them. It was seen that this would be the case during the inspection. Chessington DS0000061472.V361904.R02.S.doc Version 5.2 Page 22 Conduct and Management of the Home The intended outcomes for Standards 37 – 43 are: 37. 38. 39. 40. 41. 42. 43. Service users benefit from a well run home. Service users benefit from the ethos, leadership and management approach of the home. Service users are confident their views underpin all self-monitoring, review and development by the home. Service users’ rights and best interests are safeguarded by the home’s policies and procedures. Service users’ rights and best interests are safeguarded by the home’s record keeping policies and procedures. The health, safety and welfare of service users are promoted and protected. Service users benefit from competent and accountable management of the service. The Commission considers Standards 37, 39, and 42 the key standards to be inspected. JUDGEMENT – we looked at outcomes for the following standard(s): 37, 39, 42 Quality in this outcome area is good. This judgement has been made using available evidence including a visit to this service. People living at the home benefit from a home that is run well with good leadership. The quality assurance systems to ensure the home is run in people’s best interests is fully implemented. EVIDENCE: The provider and responsible individual run and manage Chessington. Both the provider and manager in post are in the process of completing the Registered Manager’s Award. The manager is going through our registration process at the moment, which includes an interview. The Provider obviously enjoys running the Home saying’ I wouldn’t want to do anything else now’. Staff felt that the Provider was supportive and ‘doing everything with good intention’. Chessington DS0000061472.V361904.R02.S.doc Version 5.2 Page 23 Peoples’ records, some risk assessments and records of consultation processes as previously mentioned are still not consistently recorded well although all staff had the knowledge about the reasoning behind them. This should improve now a manager is registered with the commission. The provider and responsible individual regularly review the care people receive, through care plan reviews, consulting with the people living at the home and having good contact with care managers. The provider even knew their telephone number off by heart. The home sent surveys to care managers, district nurses and relatives, to seek their views on the services they provide. The provider has devised a quality assurance statement that sets out the standards they want to achieve to ensure the services they provide are in the best interests of the people living at the home. The plan sets out how they intend to carry out these standards with time scales and who is responsible, which means that other staff will be aware of when these monitors are due and what action needs to be taken. Information was provided by the home prior to the site visit indicating all necessary polices and procedures are in place and up to date. These are not inspected on the day but the information is used to help form a judgement as to whether the home has the correct policies to keep the people using the service and staff safe. In this instance policies and procedures were in place. The home does not have a fire alarm system, the fire department advised the home to install smoke detectors, which they have. A fire blanket and a fire extinguisher are installed in the kitchen. The provider checks the smoke detectors each week and keeps a record of the checks. This ensures peoples’ welfare and safety is protected. The provider has completed risk assessments relating to reducing the risk of fire but needs to ensure that there is a full environmental and premises risk assessment done including the outside space so that people can take well-informed risks that are proportionate. Chessington DS0000061472.V361904.R02.S.doc Version 5.2 Page 24 SCORING OF OUTCOMES This page summarises the assessment of the extent to which the National Minimum Standards for Care Homes for Adults 18-65 have been met and uses the following scale. The scale ranges from: 4 Standard Exceeded 2 Standard Almost Met (Commendable) (Minor Shortfalls) 3 Standard Met 1 Standard Not Met (No Shortfalls) (Major Shortfalls) “X” in the standard met box denotes standard not assessed on this occasion “N/A” in the standard met box denotes standard not applicable CHOICE OF HOME Standard No Score 1 X 2 3 3 X 4 X 5 X INDIVIDUAL NEEDS AND CHOICES Standard No 6 7 8 9 10 Score CONCERNS AND COMPLAINTS Standard No Score 22 3 23 3 ENVIRONMENT Standard No Score 24 3 25 X 26 X 27 X 28 X 29 X 30 3 STAFFING Standard No Score 31 X 32 3 33 X 34 3 35 2 36 3 CONDUCT AND MANAGEMENT OF THE HOME Standard No 37 38 39 40 41 42 43 Score 3 2 X 2 X LIFESTYLES Standard No Score 11 X 12 3 13 3 14 X 15 3 16 3 17 3 PERSONAL AND HEALTHCARE SUPPORT Standard No 18 19 20 21 Score 3 3 3 X 3 X 3 X X 3 X Chessington DS0000061472.V361904.R02.S.doc Version 5.2 Page 25 Are there any outstanding requirements from the last inspection? No STATUTORY REQUIREMENTS This section sets out the actions, which must be taken so that the registered person/s meets the Care Standards Act 2000, Care Homes Regulations 2001 and the National Minimum Standards. The Registered Provider(s) must comply with the given timescales. No. Standard Regulation Requirement Timescale for action RECOMMENDATIONS These recommendations relate to National Minimum Standards and are seen as good practice for the Registered Provider/s to consider carrying out. No. 1. Refer to Standard YA7 Good Practice Recommendations Any discussions and agreements reached with other professionals about decisions made on behalf of service users that may infringe upon their privacy, rights or freedom of movement should be recorded appropriately. This will ensure there is a record of the date and the people involved in such decisions. This is carried over from the previous inspection. 2. YA9 Risk assessments should provide enough detail to ensure staff fully understand what would happen if they did not reduce the risk. The detail should include clear action on what to do to minimise the risk and be proportionate to enable people to take risks at times if the benefit is greater than the risk. Chessington DS0000061472.V361904.R02.S.doc Version 5.2 Page 26 3. YA35 The provider should continue to seek specialist training for all staff that helps to meet the needs of the people living at the home such a Total Communication, Breakaway and/or Gentle Teaching and ensure that staff keep up to date in good practices. This is carried over from the previous inspection. Chessington DS0000061472.V361904.R02.S.doc Version 5.2 Page 27 Commission for Social Care Inspection South West Colston 33 33 Colston Avenue Bristol BS1 4UA National Enquiry Line: Telephone: 0845 015 0120 or 0191 233 3323 Textphone: 0845 015 2255 or 0191 233 3588 Email: enquiries@csci.gsi.gov.uk Web: www.csci.org.uk © This report is copyright Commission for Social Care Inspection (CSCI) and may only be used in its entirety. Extracts may not be used or reproduced without the express permission of CSCI Chessington DS0000061472.V361904.R02.S.doc Version 5.2 Page 28 - Please note that this information is included on www.bestcarehome.co.uk under license from the regulator. Re-publishing this information is in breach of the terms of use of that website. Discrete codes and changes have been inserted throughout the textual data shown on the site that will provide incontrovertable proof of copying in the event this information is re-published on other websites. 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