Please wait

Please note that the information on this website is now out of date. It is planned that we will update and relaunch, but for now is of historical interest only and we suggest you visit cqc.org.uk

Care Home: Maple House

  • 23 Manor Road Aldershot Hampshire GU11 3DG
  • Tel: 01252325753
  • Fax: 01252341963

Maple house has recently changed its name from Manor house and has built a new extension that is nearing completion. It has also implemented a modernisation programme to existing areas includung shared rooms and replacing/updating furniture and equipment. The home is registered to accommodate 47 residents. The service offered is for older people with mental health frailty and nursing needs. The accommodation is offered over two floors with two lounge areas and a separate dinning room, seating is also available in the conservatory and garden area, accessed from the conservatory.

  • Latitude: 51.242000579834
    Longitude: -0.76800000667572
  • Manager: Mrs Lindsey Virginia Long
  • UK
  • Total Capacity: 47
  • Type: Care home with nursing
  • Provider: Dr Zyreida Denning
  • Ownership: Private
  • Care Home ID: 10244
Residents Needs:
Dementia, Old age, not falling within any other category

Latest Inspection

This is the latest available inspection report for this service, carried out on 24th July 2009. CQC found this care home to be providing an Good service.

The inspector made no statutory requirements on the home as a result of this inspection and there were no outstanding actions from the previous inspection report.

For extracts, read the latest CQC inspection for Maple House.

What the care home does well The homes pre-admission assessment process ensured that the home was able to identify the kind of support required for people considering moving into Maple House. The home had gathered information from a range of different people including health and social care practitioners ensuring a full picture of the persons care needs had been assessed before confirming arrangements to move in. The home provided residents with a safe and homely place to live. 3 out of 4 residents agreed that the home was` always` fresh and clean. One commented; `I am satisfied in here`. A relative of one of the residents commented;` wonderful extension`. A visiting relative commented; `my dad/mum wouldn`t get the same care from other homes, this has a family atmosphere`. Residents health care needs had been regularly monitored, reviewed and actioned. 3 out of 4 residents completing the CQC survey confirmed that the home always made sure they received the medical care they needed. All care plans sampled detailed the residents food preferences, and where necessary, special diets and needs had been recorded. All the residents completing the CQC Survey agreed that they liked the meals at the home. Residents completing the section of the CQC survey titled; what the home does well, all agreed that the home provided good activities and food. 4 out of 4 residents confirmed that the home arrange activities that they could take part in. Residents consulted confirmed this view. A resident completing the CQC survey confirmed the home respected their choices and provided them with the support to realise their needs;` the home looks after me very well. If I wanted to go to the pub they arrange for me to do this with one of the staff`. A relative completing the CQC survey stated; `the activities supervisor does a wonderful job`. Staff are very caring, always welcoming and kind to relatives`. Family and friends were encouraged to visit and attend special functions arranged by the home that included all the major celebratory dates such as birthdays, bank holidays and social events such as; barbecues and garden parties. A relative commenting on why they liked the home said ` I can visit at any time, day or night; I visited at 7 pm last night`. The home supported residents to continue to practice their religious and spiritual needs by making sure that multicultural services were available to the residents. A resident commenting in the CQC survey said; `I am very happy to be looked after by staff in this home`. What has improved since the last inspection? The home has endeavoured to provide good outcomes for the residents since the last key inspection. The home has built an extension to the main home that has in the words of the AQAA; `enabled us to have single rooms for residents`. The residents have acquired a new conservatory, furniture, a sensory garden and when completed, a family room for relatives wishing to spend the night. What the care home could do better: There were no requirements or recommendations necessary during this inspection. Key inspection report Care homes for older people Name: Address: Maple House 23 Manor Road Aldershot Hampshire GU11 3DG     The quality rating for this care home is:   two star good service A quality rating is our assessment of how well a care home is meeting the needs of the people who use it. We give a quality rating following a full review of the service. We call this full review a ‘key’ inspection. Lead inspector: Damian Griffiths     Date: 2 4 0 7 2 0 0 9 This is a review of quality of outcomes that people experience in this care home. We believe high quality care should • • • • • Be safe Have the right outcomes, including clinical outcomes Be a good experience for the people that use it Help prevent illness, and promote healthy, independent living Be available to those who need it when they need it. The first part of the review gives the overall quality rating for the care home: • • • • 3 2 1 0 stars - excellent stars - good star - adequate star - poor There is also a bar chart that gives a quick way of seeing the quality of care that the home provides under key areas that matter to people. There is a summary of what we think this service does well, what they have improved on and, where it applies, what they need to do better. We use the national minimum standards to describe the outcomes that people should experience. National minimum standards are written by the Department of Health for each type of care service. After the summary there is more detail about our findings. The following table explains what you will see under each outcome area. Outcome area (for example Choice of home) These are the outcomes that people staying in care homes should experience. that people have said are important to them: They reflect the things This box tells you the outcomes that we will always inspect against when we do a key inspection. This box tells you any additional outcomes that we may inspect against when we do a key inspection. This is what people staying in this care home experience: Judgement: This box tells you our opinion of what we have looked at in this outcome area. We will say whether it is excellent, good, adequate or poor. Evidence: This box describes the information we used to come to our judgement. Care Homes for Older People Page 2 of 30 We review the quality of the service against outcomes from the National Minimum Standards (NMS). Those standards are written by the Department of Health for each type of care service. Copies of the National Minimum Standards – Care Homes for Older People can be found at www.dh.gov.uk or bought from The Stationery Office (TSO) PO Box 29, St Crispins, Duke Street, Norwich, NR3 1GN. Tel: 0870 600 5522. Online ordering from the Stationery Office is also available: www.tso.co.uk/bookshop The mission of the Care Quality Commission is to make care better for people by: • Regulating health and adult social care services to ensure quality and safety standards, drive improvement and stamp out bad practice • Protecting the rights of people who use services, particularly the most vulnerable and those detained under the Mental Health Act 1983 • Providing accessible, trustworthy information on the quality of care and services so people can make better decisions about their care and so that commissioners and providers of services can improve services. • Providing independent public accountability on how commissioners and providers of services are improving the quality of care and providing value for money. Reader Information Document Purpose Author Audience Further copies from Copyright Inspection report Care Quality Commission General public 0870 240 7535 (telephone order line) Copyright © (2009) Care Quality Commission (CQC). This publication may be reproduced in whole or in part, free of charge, in any format or medium provided that it is not used for commercial gain. This consent is subject to the material being reproduced accurately and on proviso that it is not used in a derogatory manner or misleading context. The material should be acknowledged as CQC copyright, with the title and date of publication of the document specified. www.cqc.org.uk Internet address Care Homes for Older People Page 3 of 30 Information about the care home Name of care home: Address: Maple House 23 Manor Road Aldershot Hampshire GU11 3DG 01252325753 01252341963 virginialong@tiscaly.co.uk Telephone number: Fax number: Email address: Provider web address: Name of registered provider(s): Type of registration: Number of places registered: Dr Zyreida Denning care home 47 Conditions of registration: Category(ies) : Number of places (if applicable): Under 65 dementia old age, not falling within any other category Additional conditions: The maximum number of service users to be accommodated is 47 The registered person may provide the following category/ies of service only: Care home with nursing (N) to service users of the following gender: Either Whose primary care needs on admission to the home are within the following categories: Old age, not falling within any other category (OP) Dementia (DE) Date of last inspection Brief description of the care home Maple house has recently changed its name from Manor house and has built a new extension that is nearing completion. It has also implemented a modernisation programme to existing areas includung shared rooms and replacing/updating furniture and equipment. The home is registered to accommodate 47 residents. The service offered is for older people with mental health frailty and nursing needs. The accommodation is offered over two floors with two lounge areas and a separate dinning room, seating is also available in the conservatory and garden area, accessed Care Homes for Older People Page 4 of 30 Over 65 0 47 47 0 Brief description of the care home from the conservatory. Care Homes for Older People Page 5 of 30 Summary This is an overview of what we found during the inspection. The quality rating for this care home is: Our judgement for each outcome: two star good service Choice of home Health and personal care Daily life and social activities Complaints and protection Environment Staffing Management and administration peterchart Poor Adequate Good Excellent How we did our inspection: The inspection took place at 10 am in the morning on the 24th July. The registered manager was present throughout the inspection. Information included in this report was gathered by talking to residents, care staff and visiting relatives. Prior to the inspection a selection of Care Quality Commission (CQC) survey forms were sent to the home for distribution to people involved with the home. We received 9 completed CQC surveys in total. 4 surveys were completed by residents and 5 surveys by care staff giving their views of the service. We were also able to gather information from talking to relatives visiting the home one of whom completed a CQC survey. Time was spent reading, reviewing care plans and records kept in the home. This included; preadmission assessments, risk assessments, the duty rota, training and recruitment records. Observation of residents and care worker communication also formed part of our information gathering process for this report. The home had completed an Annual Quality Assurance Assessment, self assessment Care Homes for Older People Page 6 of 30 (AQAA). This provided us with information relating to; what the home considers it does well, what it could do better, what had improved within the last 12 months and planned improvements. The AQAA had been completed on time by the registered manager and contained useful information about the home. The judgements have been made using the Key Lines of Regulatory Assessment (KLORA) which are guidelines that enable the Commission to be able to make an informed decision about the outcome areas. Care Homes for Older People Page 7 of 30 What the care home does well: What has improved since the last inspection? What they could do better: There were no requirements or recommendations necessary during this inspection. Care Homes for Older People Page 8 of 30 If you want to know what action the person responsible for this care home is taking following this report, you can contact them using the details on page 4. The report of this inspection is available from our website www.cqc.org.uk. You can get printed copies from enquiries@cqc.org.uk or by telephoning our order line 0870 240 7535. Care Homes for Older People Page 9 of 30 Details of our findings Contents Choice of home (standards 1 - 6) Health and personal care (standards 7 - 11) Daily life and social activities (standards 12 - 15) Complaints and protection (standards 16 - 18) Environment (standards 19 - 26) Staffing (standards 27 - 30) Management and administration (standards 31 - 38) Outstanding statutory requirements Requirements and recommendations from this inspection Care Homes for Older People Page 10 of 30 Choice of home These are the outcomes that people staying in care homes should experience. They reflect the things that people have said are important to them: People are confident that the care home can support them. This is because there is an accurate assessment of their needs that they, or people close to them, have been involved in. This tells the home all about them and the support they need. People who stay at the home only for intermediate care, have a clear assessment that includes a plan on what they hope for and want to achieve when they return home. People can decide whether the care home can meet their support and accommodation needs. This is because they, or people close to them, have been able to visit the home and have got full, clear, accurate and up to date information about the home. If they decide to stay in the home they know about their rights and responsibilities because there is an easy to understand contract or statement of terms and conditions between them and the care home that includes how much they will pay and what the home provides for the money. This is what people staying in this care home experience: Judgement: People using this service experience good quality outcomes in this area. We have made this judgement using a range of evidence, including a visit to this service. New residents considering moving into Maple House received a full preadmission assessment of their care needs to ensure that the home could provide the support they needed. Evidence: We received four completed surveys from the residents of Maple House. 2 out of 4 residents completing the CQC survey agreed that they had received enough information about the home before they moved in. We sampled five care plans belonging to the residents at the home. We were able to establish that all the residents had received a pre-admission assessment prior to the moving into the home. Important areas that were essential to maintaining the new residents health and social care needs had been recorded in the assessment. This included personal and family details, food preferences and special diets and important healthcare information, including; diabetes, tissue viability and pre-existing conditions, such as Parkinsons. Pre-admission information had been gathered from a number of sources including Care Homes for Older People Page 11 of 30 Evidence: family and friends. The home also worked closely with a well-known local organisation that offered end of life care and new and existing residents benefited from the additional input of social, mental health and healthcare practitioners involved in this area of care, such as, pain relief. A visiting relative commented; we looked at other homes, I go home confident that he/she doing well. They cant do enough for them. Maple House did not provide Intermediate Care. Care Homes for Older People Page 12 of 30 Health and personal care These are the outcomes that people staying in care homes should experience. They reflect the things that people have said are important to them: People’s health, personal and social care needs are met. The home has a plan of care that the person, or someone close to them, has been involved in making. If they take medicine, they manage it themselves if they can. If they cannot manage their medicine, the care home supports them with it, in a safe way. People’s right to privacy is respected and the support they get from staff is given in a way that maintains their dignity. If people are approaching the end of their life, the care home will respect their choices and help them feel comfortable and secure. They, and people close to them, are reassured that their death will be handled with sensitivity, dignity and respect, and take account of their spiritual and cultural wishes. This is what people staying in this care home experience: Judgement: People using this service experience good quality outcomes in this area. We have made this judgement using a range of evidence, including a visit to this service. Residents care plans detailing social and healthcare needs had been reviewed on a regular basis. This included medication administration that helped support consistency of care provision in a manner that respected the residents dignity and privacy. Evidence: The homes AQAA stated; every resident has a care plan written by their key worker within 48 hours of admission. We inspected 5 care plans including those belonging to 3 new residents to the home. Each care plan had been completed from information gathered during the preadmission process and focused on how best to support the residents social and healthcare needs. Care plans followed a standardised format and design providing consistent and easy to read, resident focused, information. Details were contained in colour-coded sections that included; personal and family information, social and health care information, risk assessments in all relevant areas, medication details, monitoring charts and a diary of residents activities. Risk assessments had been completed in the areas of support as mentioned above. As part of a risk assessment process some Care Homes for Older People Page 13 of 30 Evidence: residents with dementia care needs required additional monitoring, for example, Mrs X was subject to anxiety attacks and their behaviour could be quite challenging. Mrs X had received a behavioural plan that advise care staff of the most appropriate approach to assist Mrs X and reduce her anxiety in a positive way. New residents had received a care plan within the 48 hour time period as stated in the homes AQAA and were signed by the residents or their representative and their key worker. Residents health care needs had been regularly monitored, reviewed and actioned. Care plans showed that social and healthcare practitioners were regularly involved providing the healthcare support to the residents in areas such as; GP, mental health, palliative care and community nursing. Residents supported by the local authority, had received a annual review from a social care practitioner. Regular monitoring practice of residents healthcare needs were in evidence in the following areas; weight, tissue viability, behaviour and blood test results for diabetes. This showed that the home was fully involved in a multi-agency approach to meeting residents health care needs. This was also confirmed by a relative visiting the home who commented, my mother/father always appears to be well looked after, clean, and as well groomed as is possible. We sampled three care plans to see how the home supported residents with their medication. Medications recorded in residents care plans were consistent with medication administration records. Medication was administered by registered general nurses (RGN) who had also received training in this area of support. The homes AQAA stated; we have purchased new drug trolleys and a new CD cabinet. We observed care staff administering medication from the new trolleys and record the prescribed dosage in a medication administration record (MAR) book after residents had taken the medication. The trolley was always locked while the nurse was away from it. Medication that was not taken, spoilt or not required was stored in the trolley and recorded in the drug returns book. Controlled drugs were stored and recorded separately, as stated in the AQAA, and two signatures were required to confirm the prescribed dosage had been administered. We were advised a purpose built room would shortly be in use as a treatment room housing medication. This showed how the home continued to develop care support and to provide good outcomes for the residents. Nursing/care staff were observed providing care and supporting residents dignity and privacy, for example, always knocking before entering a residents room. The office Care Homes for Older People Page 14 of 30 Evidence: door was always open to residents and staff. We observed staff intervening to help a resident who was anxious and upset. The resident was invited to sit with the care staff in the office where they were able to employ distraction techniques that had a calming effect on them. Observations of staff practice confirmed that residents behavioural/care plans were being followed; care needs were being met preserving the privacy and dignity of the residents at Maple House. Care Homes for Older People Page 15 of 30 Daily life and social activities These are the outcomes that people staying in care homes should experience. They reflect the things that people have said are important to them: Each person is treated as an individual and the care home is responsive to his or her race, culture, religion, age, disability, gender and sexual orientation. They are part of their local community. The care home supports people to follow personal interests and activities. People are able to keep in touch with family, friends and representatives. They are as independent as they can be, lead their chosen lifestyle and have the opportunity to make the most of their abilities. People have nutritious and attractive meals and snacks, at a time and place to suit them. There are no additional outcomes. This is what people staying in this care home experience: Judgement: People using this service experience good quality outcomes in this area. We have made this judgement using a range of evidence, including a visit to this service. The home provided a good range of activities to meet peoples different needs and provided a choice of food that most people liked. Family and friends were made to feel welcome and residents were supported to access the local community. Evidence: Residents completing the section of the CQC survey titled; what the home does well, all agreed that the home provided good activities and food. Residents consulted confirmed this view and a relative completing the survey stated; the activities supervisor does a wonderful job; better. The residents were observed enjoying a Sherry morning and later, a relaxing film of their choice. Residents requiring something more lively could attend a bingo session being held in the conservatory. Residents preferences had been recorded in, my timetabled activities, for example, Mrs X liked sitting in a recliner chair while watching the TV or listening to relaxing music. Mrs Z preferred to go shopping with her daughter. Residents accessed the local community and were supported to attend leisure and religious activities. Religious services were listed on the notice board, as was, a weekly activities list. Maple House provided a range of diverse religious services that reflected the multicultural needs of the residents and care staff. Activities such as; bingo, pet therapy and sherry mornings were also featured in the 2007 key inspection. The homes AQAA showed Care Homes for Older People Page 16 of 30 Evidence: how they were reviewing this area of care in the section titled, what we could do better, it stated; we would like a minibus instead of using dial a ride and we have tried a computer with some of our residents but we have been unsuccessful. Family and friends were encouraged to visit and attend special functions arranged by the home. The notice board proclaimed that; BBQ 30th July from 12 p.m. for residents, relatives and staff. A relative of one they liked the home said, I can visit at any time day or night, I visited at 7 pm last night. Commenting on the activities available to relatives and residents they confirmed that the home had celebrated, VE day. This confirmed the homes AQAA statement, we involve relatives in fundraising and keeping relatives aware of activities. Parties and celebrations take place on a regular basis. We have open visiting hours and encourage residents to have meals with their families. We celebrate golden anniversaries and birthdays with all the members of the families. A resident completing the CQC survey confirmed that the home respected their choices and provided them with the support to realise their needs, the home looks after me very well. If I wanted to go to the pub, they arrange for me to do this, with one of the staff. All care plans sampled, detailed the residents food preferences, and where necessary, special dietary needs. Mrs X preferred; fish, bacon, eggs and chicken. Mr G was a vegetarian and a diabetic. Mrs W preferred porridge for breakfast and Mrs G preferred breakfast in bed. Residents indicated in the CQC survey that they; always liked the meals at the home. A four-week cycle of menu plans were in place. Residents could choose from a variety of nutritious meals that were advertised on the homes notice board. The homes supper menu for Tuesday provided a broccoli and cauliflower cheese bake. Residents were able to choose a meal that was not on the menu if they preferred and if religious/cultural preferences dictated. Be AQAA confirmed the homes commitment to providing wholesome and nutritious food to its residents; we have built a kitchen on the top floor and employed two qualified chefs enabling us to tailor make our menus to suit the residents and staff dietary requirements. Residents with special dietary needs had received regular input from a dietician. To ensure the residents continued good health care, staff had regularly monitored and reviewed their dietary requirements for instance Mr Gs diabetes was regularly monitored by measuring his blood sugar levels and Mrs X was regularly weighed. Residents with difficulty eating and at risk of malnutrition also received regular monitoring. Care Homes for Older People Page 17 of 30 Complaints and protection These are the outcomes that people staying in care homes should experience. They reflect the things that people have said are important to them: If people have concerns with their care, they or people close to them know how to complain. Any concern is looked into and action taken to put things right. The care home safeguards people from abuse and neglect and takes action to follow up any allegations. People’s legal rights are protected, including being able to vote in elections. This is what people staying in this care home experience: Judgement: People using this service experience good quality outcomes in this area. We have made this judgement using a range of evidence, including a visit to this service. The home had a working complaints system and arrangements were in place to safeguard the residents living in the home. Evidence: The homes AQAA had stated, we try to action complaints within 48 hours. The complaints procedure was available on the notice board at the entrance to the home. A complaints and compliments book and a suggestions box were also available. Residents completing the CQC survey confirmed that they knew somebody to talk to if they were not happy. 1 out of 3 residents confirmed that they did not know how to make a formal complaint, however residents had not noted this as a concern. One resident stated in the section of the CQC survey titled; what could the home do better; I am very happy to be looked after by staff in this home. Im very proud to be here with the friendly staff and manager. A relative of one of the residents, completing the CQC survey, was confident that the home would always contact them and would keep them informed of any concerns; I had a call at midnight on one occasion. 5 out of 5 care staff completing the CQC survey confirmed that they knew what to do if someone had concerns about the home. Two care staff consulted about whistle blowing procedures advised that they were aware of who to contact in the event that they were unhappy about the homes conduct. Care Homes for Older People Page 18 of 30 Evidence: In the section of the AQAA titled; our plans for improvements in the next 12 months, the home had confirmed its intentions of continued development in this area of care by stating; a course for all staff on hospitality anddealing with complaints is being investigated and more awareness for relatives on how to complain. The home was also aware of new government legislation connected with the Mental Capacity Act and had taken the steps to arrange for training and information. The AQAA stated in section titled; our plans for improvement in the next 12 months; we will be looking at restraint issue together with the new Deprivation of Liberty guidelines. Two care staff consulted about the homes safeguarding procedures were aware of the in-house procedures and gave examples of how they would detect possible physical abuse. Staff were knowledgeable and indicated how they would follow individual care plan details, consulting the residents and when necessary consulting the manager. Care staff were aware of contacting CQC as part of the homes acknowledged whistle blowing procedures. Care staff acknowledged that they had a buddy who supervised them during their induction period and that they had received a staff handbook detailing the homes policies and procedures. Care Homes for Older People Page 19 of 30 Environment These are the outcomes that people staying in care homes should experience. They reflect the things that people have said are important to them: People stay in a safe and well-maintained home that is homely, clean, pleasant and hygienic. People stay in a home that has enough space and facilities for them to lead the life they choose and to meet their needs. The home makes sure they have the right specialist equipment that encourages and promotes their independence. Their room feels like their own, it is comfortable and they feel safe when they use it. This is what people staying in this care home experience: Judgement: People using this service experience good quality outcomes in this area. We have made this judgement using a range of evidence, including a visit to this service. The standard of cleanliness at the home was very good providing residents with attractive, safe and homely place to live. Evidence: A new wing that could accommodate an additional 14 rooms was almost complete and residents were observed benefiting from the new ,light and airy, conservatory, where they could sit and observed the garden area. We were advised that a new room for families wishing to stay overnight and a medical treatment room would be available in the near future. The home was clean, airy and without any offensive odours, there were no obvious risks in evidence. We were advised that the fire safety officer was working with the home to advise on potential fire risks. 3 out of 4 residents agreed that the home was, always fresh and clean . One commented that; I am satisfied in here and a relative confirmed thier view of the new building, stated; a wonderful extension. The manager advised that this sensory garden area was still being developed and relatives were involved, sometimes providing plants . This highlighted how the building works were benefiting the residents and their families. The report also confirmed that: consultation regarding this development has taken place with professionals service users, relatives and staff which has been positive. Care Homes for Older People Page 20 of 30 Evidence: Care staff were using the garden area for their break, and the manager advised, that a small garden shed built at one side of the conservatory, was to become the new staff room. The manager went on to advised , that in the interests of good outcomes for residents and staff, she would be reviewing the use of alternative areas in the new wing. This was to ensure that care staff were properly rested when working with the residents. One comment made in the CQC staff survey confirmed their concerns in this area; the care staff here are a good ,hard working team, there could be better facilities for them. To help identify each floor of the care home each had been painted a particular colour. The residents front doors contained and small, boxed collage, a memory box, containing objects and symbols important to each resident, for instance: a WW2 fighter plane, a butterfly, a photo of a grandchild were on individuals doors. The relevance to each resident was detailed in the care plans inspected. Each one depicted something that signified the individual, it also provided a good memory prompt and provided an interesting and different way of identifying the room. Each residents rooms contained their own furniture and cherished objects. The two rooms inspected each had a new adjustable bed. We were advised that all residents had such beds. Each room has its own sink with hot water temperatures that were comfortable for hand washing. The home had received full risk assessment of current and future building works to ensure the safety of residents. Stairways were clear and fully accessible and a new lift had been installed. The homes AQAA, indicated that all shared rooms were in the process of being converted, into single rooms and that the process would be completed by 2011. The manager advised that a handyman/decorator was in the process of being enlisted subject to documentation being submitted. This would reduce the risk of harm by managing maintenance work more effectively and reduce any possible inconvenience to residents. New and existing bathrooms were clean and tidy and contained equipment that enabled the care staff to assist the residents to bathe in safety. Additional bathrooms had been built to accommodate new and existing residents to the home. Existing bathroom floors were in need of some attention, as lino was worn and due for replacement, and some non slip floors were in need of resurfacing. We were advised that the home would be addressing these issues as a matter of routine following a review of all building works currently being completed. Care Homes for Older People Page 21 of 30 Evidence: A new and detached laundry room had recently been built. This housed new washing machines and laundry equipment that was observed to be in good working order. A member of staff had been allocated responsibility for residents laundry. The addition of this new building ensured that the homes capacity to manage additional and existing laundry efficiently. Care Homes for Older People Page 22 of 30 Staffing These are the outcomes that people staying in care homes should experience. They reflect the things that people have said are important to them: People have safe and appropriate support as there are enough competent staff on duty at all times. They have confidence in the staff at the home because checks have been done to make sure that they are suitable to care for them. Their needs are met and they are cared for by staff who get the relevant training and support from their managers. There are no additional outcomes. This is what people staying in this care home experience: Judgement: People using this service experience good quality outcomes in this area. We have made this judgement using a range of evidence, including a visit to this service. The skill mix of care staff ensured that the care needs of the residents could be met. The home employed robust recruitment practices and training programmes that promoted the safeguarding of residents at Maple house. Evidence: Under the title what we do well; the homes AQAA confirmed the home displays a rota which clearly shows what staff are on duty. Photographs of the care staff on duty had been placed on display at the entrance to the home. This gave visitors and residents the home the opportunity and convenience of seeing the name and likeness of who was on duty that day. We received five completed CQC surveys from care staff. They all agreed that they had received training that; Helped them understand and meet the individual needs of residents. Helped to keep up-to-date with new ways of working. Helped with training that gave them enough knowledge about health care and medication. Care Homes for Older People Page 23 of 30 Evidence: Comments from staff included; our care home support very well in terms of providing high-quality care to service users. All care is received NVQ in health and social care training. The home was committed to improving communication and stated in the AQAA section titled; what we could better and how we are going to do this; communication could be improved on. It went on to say confirmed that it had employed the local college to give; English classes in our nursing home, every Wednesday. This is also confirmed by care staff completing CQC survey; The home manager helps oversee staff to improve their English skills by providing ESOL English classes for them. We inspected the staff rota and checked to see if the staff on duty possessed the skills to care for the residents. Staff on duty consisted of RGNs and care staff who had received training in the following areas that included; fire safety, falls prevention, promoting continence, administration of medication, dementia, health and safety, challenging behaviour, first aid , infection control, manual handling and safeguarding. Individual training and the subsequent skill mix of staff on duty ensured that care staff were equipped with the necessary skills to meet the assessed care needs of the residents. We inspected the personnel files 6 new and existing care staff to confirm the homes AQAA statement; We undertake a robust recruitment process. The home had made sure that new staff to the home had received a PoVA first and enhanced, criminal records bureau clearances prior to working without supervision. All personnel files contained photographic evidence of identity, references from previous employers including employment histories. Utility bills provided proof of address and where necessary, car insurance details were on file. This confirmed that the home employed robust recruitment procedures in order to safeguard residents. A full training programme provided specialist and basic training skills necessary and relevant for care staff to meet the care needs of residents. The homes AQAA confirmed that over 50 , 12/19, of permanent care staff had achieved a, National Vocational Qualification level 2 (NVQ 2) award. All new staff had received a full induction. Evidence was in place showing that care staff/nurses could access specialist training programs that were relevant to meeting the needs of residents at Maple house these included; visual impairment, Parkinson, dementia, catheter care and palliative care. The home showed evidence of future training programs in support of the new, 2005 Mental Capacity Act and the Deprivation of Liberty (DoL). Relatives completing the CQC survey said that; staff are very caring, always welcoming and kind to relatives. Care Homes for Older People Page 24 of 30 Management and administration These are the outcomes that people staying in care homes should experience. They reflect the things that people have said are important to them: People have confidence in the care home because it is led and managed appropriately. People control their own money and choose how they spend it. If they or someone close to them cannot manage their money, it is managed by the care home in their best interests. The environment is safe for people and staff because appropriate health and safety practices are carried out. People get the right support from the care home because the manager runs it appropriately with an open approach that makes them feel valued and respected. The people staying at the home are safeguarded because it follows clear financial and accounting procedures, keeps records appropriately and ensures their staff understand the way things should be done. They get the right care because the staff are supervised and supported by their managers. This is what people staying in this care home experience: Judgement: People using this service experience good quality outcomes in this area. We have made this judgement using a range of evidence, including a visit to this service. Residents benefited from living in a well managed home where their best interests were safeguarded and their health, safety and welfare were promoted and protected. Evidence: The registered manager was RGN trained and had achieved a level 4 NVQ. Had recently completed training updates in safeguarding and sensory deprivation awareness to enhance the residents care needs. The manager advised that she preferred a hands-on management style. This included unannounced spot checks and ensuring time was spent working alongside each of the three staff shifts that formed the basis of care provision at the home. Care staff consulted all felt supported and able to approach and discuss any issues. A member of staff completing CQC survey confirmed; the manager is very hands on, she knows each of the residents needs likes and dislikes, also their medical and physical needs. The manager had ensured that equality and diversity at the home was respected and implemented by consulting residents and the multinational staff team working at the Care Homes for Older People Page 25 of 30 Evidence: home. The AQAA confirmed that: all staff are aware of the Age Discrimination Act. The manager advised that the home was seeking to recruit a deputy manager and that a mental health consultant had recently been employed by the home. Their role being to advise and train staff in all aspects of, good mental health and in particular, provide awareness of new and existing legislation to enhance the care support available to residents. The manager had overseen a major redevelopment of the home and residents and others had been consulted about the changes. The manager advised that she was determined to continue to improve services for the residents and care staff. This included continuing to develop and review end of life care and conducting significant event analysis with care staff to see what went well. Residents and their relatives completing CQC survey made very positive comments about the home, despite the disruption that accompanies all new building work . Residents and relatives were regularly provided with questionnaires to complete about the quality of the home and a suggestion box was accessible to visitors and residents situated at the homes entrance. The homes monthly newsletter kept residents informed about what was going on at the home and offered an easy and informal way of providing important information. It contained introductions of new care staff, details of future events, photo records of residents, care staff and birthdays. The homes newsletter also provided a platform that gave the home the opportunity to promote good staff practice. Every month the home nominated a, star of the month carer. A resident completing a CQC surveys commented; Im very proud to be here with all the friendly staff and manager. Another resident confirmed that, The home looks after me very well. Nurses and care staff had regular meetings to discuss events relating to the home. All care staff completing CQC survey confirmed that the manager gave them , enough support and opportunities to discuss their work . Staff comments included; the manager provided all of the training and equipment support we need to the benefit of both staff and residents. We were advised by manager that the home does not generally hold monies for the residents. Families and residents representatives were responsible for making their own financial arrangements. There were no health and safety concerns identified during the inspection. All new areas had smoke and security alarms that were being installed. The homes health and safety audit was up to date. Fire safety representatives had been involved with the home and regular fire alarm tests drills and alarm tests had been recorded. The employers insurance liability certificate was displayed and up to date. Care Homes for Older People Page 26 of 30 Evidence: Arrangements were in place for regular service and safety checks for all electrical appliances. The home had ensured that there was useful information available relating to the, Control of Substances Hazardous to Health (COSHH) and appropriate storage areas were secured. Care staff had received training in health and safety, control of substances hazardous to health, fire safety, first aid, and moving and handling. Care Homes for Older People Page 27 of 30 Are there any outstanding requirements from the last inspection? Yes £ No R Outstanding statutory requirements These are requirements that were set at the previous inspection, but have still not been met. They say what the registered person had to do to meet the Care Standards Act 2000, Care Homes Regulations 2001 and the National Minimum Standards. No. Standard Regulation Requirement Timescale for action Care Homes for Older People Page 28 of 30 Requirements and recommendations from this inspection: Immediate requirements: These are immediate requirements that were set on the day we visited this care home. The registered person had to meet these within 48 hours. No. Standard Regulation Requirement Timescale for action Statutory requirements These requirements set out what the registered person must do to meet the Care Standards Act 2000, Care Homes Regulations 2001 and the National Minimum Standards. The registered person(s) must do this within the timescales we have set. No. Standard Regulation Requirement Timescale for action Recommendations These recommendations are taken from the best practice described in the National Minimum Standards and the registered person(s) should consider them as a way of improving their service. No Refer to Standard Good Practice Recommendations Care Homes for Older People Page 29 of 30 Helpline: Telephone: 03000 616161 Email: enquiries@cqc.org.uk Web: www.cqc.org.uk We want people to be able to access this information. If you would like a summary in a different format or language please contact our helpline or go to our website. Copyright © (2009) Care Quality Commission (CQC). This publication may be reproduced in whole or in part, free of charge, in any format or medium provided that it is not used for commercial gain. This consent is subject to the material being reproduced accurately and on proviso that it is not used in a derogatory manner or misleading context. The material should be acknowledged as CQC copyright, with the title and date of publication of the document specified. Care Homes for Older People Page 30 of 30 - Please note that this information is included on www.bestcarehome.co.uk under license from the regulator. Re-publishing this information is in breach of the terms of use of that website. Discrete codes and changes have been inserted throughout the textual data shown on the site that will provide incontrovertable proof of copying in the event this information is re-published on other websites. The policy of www.bestcarehome.co.uk is to use all legal avenues to pursue such offenders, including recovery of costs. You have been warned!

The Provider has not yet updated their profile and added details of the services and facilities they offer. If you are the provider and would like to do this, please click the "Do you run this home" button under the Description tab.

The Provider has not yet updated their profile and added details of the services and facilities they offer. If you are the provider and would like to do this, please click the "Do you run this home" button under the Description tab.

Promote this care home

Click here for links and widgets to increase enquiries and referrals for this care home.

  • Widgets to embed inspection reports into your website
  • Formated links to this care home profile
  • Links to the latest inspection report
  • Widget to add iPaper version of SoP to your website