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Care Home: Sesame

  • Sesame Bronshill Road Torquay Devon TQ1 3HA
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Sesame is a home for up to four young adults with learning disabilities. It is a safe place where they can learn to live more independently. It is close to shops and a swimming pool. There are four big bedrooms, each with a shower and toilet. There is a big kitchen where people can cook together. There is a big lounge, a conservatory, and a separate activities room. There is a garden at the front, and some space to park cars. Information about the service, and the fees, can be obtained from the Manager.

  • Latitude: 50.474998474121
    Longitude: -3.5250000953674
  • Manager: Mrs Suzanne Morrison
  • Price p/w: -
  • UK
  • Total Capacity: 4
  • Type: Care home only
  • Provider: Lifeworks/ The Bidwell Brook Foundation
  • Ownership: Private
  • Care Home ID: 19860
Residents Needs:
Learning disability

Latest Inspection

This is the latest available inspection report for this service, carried out on 22nd April 2010. CQC found this care home to be providing an Good service.

The inspector made no statutory requirements on the home as a result of this inspection and there were no outstanding actions from the previous inspection report.

For extracts, read the latest CQC inspection for Sesame.

What the care home does well Sesame is a lovely house with plenty of space for people to do things. People had their own big room, with their own shower, and all the the things they wanted. As well as a big lounge, there was a conservatory and a separate activities room, where people had done crafts and played games. There was a very nice laundry, where people could wash their own clothes, with help. As well as a big kitchen, there was a kitchen prep room, so there was plenty of space for people to prepare their own meals, with help. Some very nice staff had been employed, who were good at understanding the people who live there. Care plans had been written very carefully, with lots of information from people about how they like to be supported. Staff had been trained, so they would know how to help people, especially when they are ill. What has improved since the last inspection? This is the first inspection. What the care home could do better: Residents could have a safe place in their room to keep money and other valuable things. Staff still need more training. Key inspection report Care homes for adults (18-65 years) Name: Address: Sesame Sesame Bronshill Road Torquay Devon TQ1 3HA     The quality rating for this care home is:   two star good service A quality rating is our assessment of how well a care home is meeting the needs of the people who use it. We give a quality rating following a full review of the service. We call this full review a ‘key’ inspection. Lead inspector: Stella Lindsay     Date: 2 2 0 4 2 0 1 0 This is a review of quality of outcomes that people experience in this care home. We believe high quality care should • • • • • Be safe Have the right outcomes, including clinical outcomes Be a good experience for the people that use it Help prevent illness, and promote healthy, independent living Be available to those who need it when they need it. The first part of the review gives the overall quality rating for the care home: • • • • 3 2 1 0 stars - excellent stars - good star - adequate star - poor There is also a bar chart that gives a quick way of seeing the quality of care that the home provides under key areas that matter to people. There is a summary of what we think this service does well, what they have improved on and, where it applies, what they need to do better. We use the national minimum standards to describe the outcomes that people should experience. National minimum standards are written by the Department of Health for each type of care service. After the summary there is more detail about our findings. The following table explains what you will see under each outcome area. Outcome area (for example Choice of home) These are the outcomes that people staying in care homes should experience. that people have said are important to them: They reflect the things This box tells you the outcomes that we will always inspect against when we do a key inspection. This box tells you any additional outcomes that we may inspect against when we do a key inspection. This is what people staying in this care home experience: Judgement: This box tells you our opinion of what we have looked at in this outcome area. We will say whether it is excellent, good, adequate or poor. Evidence: This box describes the information we used to come to our judgement. Care Homes for Adults (18-65 years) Page 2 of 27 We review the quality of the service against outcomes from the National Minimum Standards (NMS). Those standards are written by the Department of Health for each type of care service. Copies of the National Minimum Standards – Care Homes for Adults (18-65 years) can be found at www.dh.gov.uk or bought from The Stationery Office (TSO) PO Box 29, St Crispins, Duke Street, Norwich, NR3 1GN. Tel: 0870 600 5522. Online ordering from the Stationery Office is also available: www.tso.co.uk/bookshop The mission of the Care Quality Commission is to make care better for people by: • Regulating health and adult social care services to ensure quality and safety standards, drive improvement and stamp out bad practice • Protecting the rights of people who use services, particularly the most vulnerable and those detained under the Mental Health Act 1983 • Providing accessible, trustworthy information on the quality of care and services so people can make better decisions about their care and so that commissioners and providers of services can improve services. • Providing independent public accountability on how commissioners and providers of services are improving the quality of care and providing value for money. Reader Information Document Purpose Author Audience Further copies from Copyright Inspection report Care Quality Commission General public 0870 240 7535 (telephone order line) © Care Quality Commission 2010 This publication may be reproduced in whole or in part in any format or medium for non-commercial purposes, provided that it is reproduced accurately and not used in a derogatory manner or in a misleading context. The source should be acknowledged, by showing the publication title and © Care Quality Commission 2010. www.cqc.org.uk Internet address Care Homes for Adults (18-65 years) Page 3 of 27 Information about the care home Name of care home: Address: Sesame Sesame Bronshill Road Torquay Devon TQ1 3HA Telephone number: Fax number: Email address: Provider web address: Name of registered provider(s): Name of registered manager (if applicable) Mrs Suzanne Morrison Type of registration: Number of places registered: care home 4 Lifeworks/ The Bidwell Brook Foundation Conditions of registration: Category(ies) : Number of places (if applicable): Under 65 learning disability Additional conditions: The maximum number of service users who can be accomodated is 4 The registered person may provide the following category of service only: Care home only -Code PC to service users of either gender whose primary needs on admission to the home are within the following category: Learning disability (Code LD) Date of last inspection Brief description of the care home Sesame is a home for up to four young adults with learning disabilities. It is a safe place where they can learn to live more independently. It is close to shops and a swimming pool. There are four big bedrooms, each with a shower and toilet. There is a big kitchen where people can cook together. There is a big lounge, a conservatory, and a separate activities room. There is a garden at the front, and some space to park cars. Care Homes for Adults (18-65 years) Page 4 of 27 Over 65 0 4 Brief description of the care home Information about the service, and the fees, can be obtained from the Manager. Care Homes for Adults (18-65 years) Page 5 of 27 Summary This is an overview of what we found during the inspection. The quality rating for this care home is: Our judgement for each outcome: two star good service Choice of home Individual needs and choices Lifestyle Personal and healthcare support Concerns, complaints and protection Environment Staffing Conduct and management of the home peterchart Poor Adequate Good Excellent How we did our inspection: We visited the home, and met the people who were living there, the Manager and two other people who work there. We looked round the house. We looked at care plans and pther care records. We saw how the staff supported people with their medicines. We saw how people were helped to manage their money. We looked at the policies and procedures that told staff how they should work. We did all this to see how Sesame is run, how people are kept safe, and what it is like Care Homes for Adults (18-65 years) Page 6 of 27 to live at Sesame. Care Homes for Adults (18-65 years) Page 7 of 27 What the care home does well: What has improved since the last inspection? What they could do better: If you want to know what action the person responsible for this care home is taking following this report, you can contact them using the details on page 4. The report of this inspection is available from our website www.cqc.org.uk. You can get printed copies from enquiries@cqc.org.uk or by telephoning our order line 0870 240 7535. Care Homes for Adults (18-65 years) Page 8 of 27 Details of our findings Contents Choice of home (standards 1 - 5) Individual needs and choices (standards 6-10) Lifestyle (standards 11 - 17) Personal and healthcare support (standards 18 - 21) Concerns, complaints and protection (standards 22 - 23) Environment (standards 24 - 30) Staffing (standards 31 - 36) Conduct and management of the home (standards 37 - 43) Outstanding statutory requirements Requirements and recommendations from this inspection Care Homes for Adults (18-65 years) Page 9 of 27 Choice of home These are the outcomes that people staying in care homes should experience. They reflect the things that people have said are important to them: People are confident that the care home can support them. This is because there is an accurate assessment of their needs that they, or people close to them, have been involved in. This tells the home all about them, what they hope for and want to achieve, and the support they need. People can decide whether the care home can meet their support and accommodation needs. This is because they, and people close to them, can visit the home and get full, clear, accurate and up to date information. If they decide to stay in the home they know about their rights and responsibilities because there is an easy to understand contract or statement of terms and conditions between the person and the care home that includes how much they will pay and what the home provides for the money. This is what people staying in this care home experience: Judgement: People using this service experience good quality outcomes in this area. We have made this judgement using a range of evidence, including a visit to this service. This service helps people to make choices, and makes sure the home is well prepared before admitting a new resident. Evidence: A Statement of Purpose had been produced, and reviewed to ensure it was still accurate. This describes in full the purpose and running of the service. The Manager said it would be made available in audio or braille forms but this had not yet been needed. A new brochure and a handbook had also been produced, which had been given to prospective service users and their representatives. One service user had been living at Sesame for several months. A second was in the process of moving in at the time of this inspection. The client and their family had been able to exercise choice, having considered services in different areas. Once the selection had been made, assessment of needs, care planning and risk assessments were carried out by the Registered Manager and the Torbay Care Trust. Staff had been to visit the person in their previous placement, and met with previous carers, to aid understanding and assist a smooth transition. The service user was visiting for day Care Homes for Adults (18-65 years) Page 10 of 27 Evidence: care while arrangements were being made to provide the furniture and equipment they needed. This gave the service users and staff time to get to know each other. A statement of terms had been prepared, to clarify what was being provided, and we saw it had been signed by the service users next of kin as well as the Care Manager (Torbay Care Trust) and the Manager of Sesame. What you can expect from Sesame has been prepared in easy read, to help people understand their service and their rights. Care Homes for Adults (18-65 years) Page 11 of 27 Individual needs and choices These are the outcomes that people staying in care homes should experience. They reflect the things that people have said are important to them: People’s needs and goals are met. The home has a plan of care that the person, or someone close to them, has been involved in making. People are able to make decisions about their life, including their finances, with support if they need it. This is because the staff promote their rights and choices. People are supported to take risks to enable them to stay independent. This is because the staff have appropriate information on which to base decisions. People are asked about, and are involved in, all aspects of life in the home. This is because the manager and staff offer them opportunities to participate in the day to day running of the home and enable them to influence key decisions. People are confident that the home handles information about them appropriately. This is because the home has clear policies and procedures that staff follow. This is what people staying in this care home experience: Judgement: People using this service experience good quality outcomes in this area. We have made this judgement using a range of evidence, including a visit to this service. This service encourages people to express their choices and be involved in care planning. Risks are managed thoughtfully, to address safety issues while improving outcomes for people. Evidence: We examined the care plan of the person who had been living at Sesame for several months. It began with information about their family and professional support. There was section on Objectives, desired outcomes and support. Advice to staff, with good detail, was provided, on a Personal Care protocol, Support in the community, Meal time protocol, and Night time support needs. These had been reviewed in December, and a full service review had been carried out in April. The care plan covered specialist requirements, and agreed restrictions on choice. This new service is still in the process of developing person centred plans, in consultation with the service users. Service users were being supported to manage their money safely. All transactions Care Homes for Adults (18-65 years) Page 12 of 27 Evidence: had been recorded, with a running balance and receipts kept, and audited regularly to make sure it was accurate. The Manager was gathering information and documentation necessary to support service users to open bank accounts. We recommended that they should consider how service users might safely keep money and other valuables in their own room, instead of in the office, to promote their independence. We saw risk assessments, with advice to staff on how to enable such activities as swimming, meal preparation, participating in an exercise class, and attending foot care, while maintaining safety. As occupancy increases, it may be that life is less smooth, with different people needing to accommodate each other. We recommend that risk assessments also include advice for staff on actions to be taken when their normal protocol has not worked, and a person exhibiting disturbed behaviour is not responding to the methods for calming that normally have been effective for them. Care Homes for Adults (18-65 years) Page 13 of 27 Lifestyle These are the outcomes that people staying in care homes should experience. They reflect the things that people have said are important to them: Each person is treated as an individual and the care home is responsive to his or her race, culture, religion, age, disability, gender and sexual orientation. They can take part in activities that are appropriate to their age and culture and are part of their local community. The care home supports people to follow personal interests and activities. People are able to keep in touch with family, friends and representatives and the home supports them to have appropriate personal, family and sexual relationships. People are as independent as they can be, lead their chosen lifestyle and have the opportunity to make the most of their abilities. Their dignity and rights are respected in their daily life. People have healthy, well-presented meals and snacks, at a time and place to suit them. People have opportunities to develop their social, emotional, communication and independent living skills. This is because the staff support their personal development. People choose and participate in suitable leisure activities. This is what people staying in this care home experience: Judgement: People using this service experience good quality outcomes in this area. We have made this judgement using a range of evidence, including a visit to this service. This service has a strong commitment to enabling service users to develop their skills, including social, emotional communication and independent living skills. They have made a good start in providing a personalised service, understanding and meeting a persons individual needs and aspirations. They will do well to maintain this level of provision with increased occupancy. Evidence: All residents are involved in all aspects of their lives from cooking and cleaning to shopping and accessing local community facilities. There was a computer in the activities room, currently used for games. The Manager was planning to arrange internet access. We saw the results of crafts, including clay modeling and jewelery making, in the activity room. A sensory room is being developed. Equipment has been delivered, though black-out is still needed unless a Care Homes for Adults (18-65 years) Page 14 of 27 Evidence: small internal room is used. We saw daily reporting sheets that show what activity the person was offered, whether they had choice, and what support they needed. These showed that a service user had been shopping, chosen their lunch, done their laundry, and played a memory game. A separate record was kept of external activities, including dog walking and an exercise class. The clothes worn, medication taken, and expected time of return were recorded, in case of any problem occurring, to alert staff back at Sesame. One person was in the process of moving in at the time of this inspection, and another application was being assessed. Staff said they hoped people would enjoy some activities together, but as yet this was unknown. We saw that although there is a written menu, meals were provided according to individual wishes and appetites. Healthy options were provided, with fresh fruit and salad. We were told that one person likes porridge and toast for their breakfast. Sometimes they say, You do it, to their Support Worker, while other times they want to do everything themself. The staff are able to go with individuals energy and preferences. Care Homes for Adults (18-65 years) Page 15 of 27 Personal and healthcare support These are the outcomes that people staying in care homes should experience. They reflect the things that people have said are important to them: People receive personal support from staff in the way they prefer and want. Their physical and emotional health needs are met because the home has procedures in place that staff follow. If people take medicine, they manage it themselves if they can. If they cannot manage their medicine, the care home supports them with it in a safe way. If people are approaching the end of their life, the care home will respect their choices and help them to feel comfortable and secure. They, and people close to them, are reassured that their death will be handled with sensitivity, dignity and respect, and take account of their spiritual and cultural wishes. This is what people staying in this care home experience: Judgement: People using this service experience good quality outcomes in this area. We have made this judgement using a range of evidence, including a visit to this service. Personal support is flexible and responsive to individual needs. Service users good health is promoted by staff recognition of problems, and supporting service users to access specialist services. Evidence: We saw in service users personal files evidence of how the service supports people. Detailed advice is written for staff to let them know how the person prefers their personal care and hygiene to be provided. Staff confirmed that people were able to choose each day whether they wanted a bath or shower. People were supported to dress and present themself in the way they liked. We saw that a health action plan had been completed by the first service user along with their representatives and the home manager, to ensure that the persons health issues were understood from the beginning. Health care professionals had carried out an Annual Health Check, and specialists had been involved appropriately. Specialist psychiatrist and nursing input had been involved, and a new drug regime was being planned to improve the persons life and health. Care Homes for Adults (18-65 years) Page 16 of 27 Evidence: We saw that medication administered was carefully recorded, and detailed records kept of health problems and incidents, to inform the health care professionals. Staff had been trained by the pharmacist to administer medication correctly. No invasive procedures were needed. Care Homes for Adults (18-65 years) Page 17 of 27 Concerns, complaints and protection These are the outcomes that people staying in care homes should experience. They reflect the things that people have said are important to them: If people have concerns with their care, they or people close to them, know how to complain. Their concern is looked into and action taken to put things right. The care home safeguards people from abuse, neglect and self-harm and takes action to follow up any allegations. There are no additional outcomes. This is what people staying in this care home experience: Judgement: People using this service experience good quality outcomes in this area. We have made this judgement using a range of evidence, including a visit to this service. Service users at Sesame are protected by clear procedures, and by well motivated staff who make all efforts to understand them. Evidence: The complaints procedure had been produced in easy read format, and given to service users and their families in the Hand book. Guidance for staff dealing with any complaint was included in the homes policy file, and had been signed by all staff to say they read and understood. The home had a suitable policy with respect to the protection of vulnerable adults from abuse, and a whistle blowing policy. A poster showing information about safeguarding procedures was displayed on the office wall. The Manager had added contact information for the local safeguarding team, in case staff needed to contact them in her absence. She had booked staff training in safeguarding vulnerable adults in the month following this inspection. We saw in a service users personal file, a section on safety and security in the home. This included staff responsibilities in checking the house for safety, as well as the clients needs for support in managing their money. Care Homes for Adults (18-65 years) Page 18 of 27 Environment These are the outcomes that people staying in care homes should experience. They reflect the things that people have said are important to them: People stay in a safe and well-maintained home that is homely, clean, comfortable, pleasant and hygienic. People stay in a home that has enough space and facilities for them to lead the life they choose and to meet their needs. The home makes sure they have the right specialist equipment that encourages and promotes their independence. Their room feels like their own, it is comfortable and they feel safe when they use it. People have enough privacy when using toilets and bathrooms. This is what people staying in this care home experience: Judgement: People using this service experience excellent quality outcomes in this area. We have made this judgement using a range of evidence, including a visit to this service. Sesame is well maintained and is a safe and pleasant place to live. There is choice in bathing facilities, and choice in social spaces. Evidence: Sesame is an attractive semi-detached house on a residential road in central Torquay. The house was chosen with care to ensure those living there could integrate into normal community life as much as possible. The whole home is very spacious and well presented with good quality furnishings and fittings. There is a garden at the front and a covered courtyard/conservatory at the side. The Manager had plans to purchase furniture and equipment for the garden before the summer. There is a choice of social spaces, with a spacious lounge and an activity room accessed through the covered courtyard. There is a large well equipped kitchen, a kitchen prep room, and a large open plan dining room. There is a small parking area at the front of the house. The Manager said they plan to provide a vehicle when the occupancy increases. The house is on a central bus route into the town and near to local shops. The bedrooms were a good size, and those with occupants were personalised, and Care Homes for Adults (18-65 years) Page 19 of 27 Evidence: furnished to suit the occupant. There were en suite showers, with thermostatic controls. Screens had been provided, as the clear glass shower units would not provide privacy. Window restrictors had been fitted to all first floor windows, to assure the safety of service users. There was also a communal bathroom. It is recommended that paper towels be provided in communal toilets and the bathroom, as the best way of maintaining good hygiene. There was a very nice laundry, well equipped and in very good condition. It was kept locked when not in use, as COSHH substances were kept there. Training for staff in infection control had been arranged. Care Homes for Adults (18-65 years) Page 20 of 27 Staffing These are the outcomes that people staying in care homes should experience. They reflect the things that people have said are important to them: People have safe and appropriate support as there are enough competent, qualified staff on duty at all times. They have confidence in the staff at the home because checks have been done to make sure that they are suitable. People’s needs are met and they are supported because staff get the right training, supervision and support they need from their managers. People are supported by an effective staff team who understand and do what is expected of them. This is what people staying in this care home experience: Judgement: People using this service experience good quality outcomes in this area. We have made this judgement using a range of evidence, including a visit to this service. Staffing has been provided flexibly to meet the needs of the service users. Staff are well trained and well supported. Evidence: Staffing was provided to meet the needs of the current service users. At the time of this inspection, one service user had been accompanied while at hospital. One to one staffing ensured that another service user was carefully introduced to the service. At night there is one member of staff on duty. They currently need to make 15 minute checks on a service user for reasons of health and safety. Staff expressed anxiety over lone working in the future, when more residents are living at Sesame. The Manager assured us that she will continue to monitor the residents needs, and that staffing will be increased when necessary. Staff had recently been working 12 hour shifts. This was arranged so that people did not have to stop activities during the day to come home for staff changes, but could plan the whole day together. The Manager told us that this pattern may be reconsidered if stresses of working long shifts become more severe, as different client needs are being addressed in the future. She had raised the matter at a staff meeting, for people to say how they were managing, and at that time it was found to be Care Homes for Adults (18-65 years) Page 21 of 27 Evidence: working well. We met a recently recruited staff member. They confirmed that a service user had shown them round the house before the formal interview. The service user gave feedback, which was recorded and kept on file. We saw that the checks that are necessary to ensure the safety of people living in the home had been carried out, and all essential documentation was in place. The home has a training chart showing the achievements and plans for the year ahead. This shows that six of the ten Support staff have achieved NVQ in care at least to level 2, four at level 3, and the Deputy Manager has achieved NVQ level 4 plus the Registered Managers Award. Training in Autism, safe administration of medication, First aid, and Safeguarding adults was provided earlier in the year. The Manager has booked training to ensure all staff will be up to date date in Moving and Handling, Epilepsy, Infection Control, Food hygiene, and further training in the Protection of Vulnerable adults. The chart demonstrates the wide variety of skills and knowledge brought to this new team from their previous experience in different care settings. Some have experience of crisis intervention, but we recommend that all staff have training in dealing with challenging behaviour, to ensure the future safety of people who live and people who work in the home. The Deputy Manager has provided 1;1 supervision for staff. We saw that appropriate records were kept, and that staff were able to share anxieties, as well as being given feedback on their performance. The Manager was prepared to start on Annual appraisals. Care Homes for Adults (18-65 years) Page 22 of 27 Conduct and management of the home These are the outcomes that people staying in care homes should experience. They reflect the things that people have said are important to them: People have confidence in the care home because it is run and managed appropriately. People’s opinions are central to how the home develops and reviews their practice, as the home has appropriate ways of making sure they continue to get things right. The environment is safe for people and staff because health and safety practices are carried out. People get the right support from the care home because the manager runs it appropriately, with an open approach that makes them feel valued and respected. They are safeguarded because the home follows clear financial and accounting procedures, keeps records appropriately and makes sure staff understand the way things should be done. This is what people staying in this care home experience: Judgement: People using this service experience good quality outcomes in this area. We have made this judgement using a range of evidence, including a visit to this service. This home is well run in the best interests of the service users. Evidence: Mrs Suzanne Morrison is the Registered Manager of Sesame. She has previous experience in managing a domiciliary Care Agency for young people with visual impairment, and she has achieved NVQ level 4 in Care and has a level 4 diploma in management. She has demonstrated that she is able to implement good practice. The Responsible Individual is Mr Richard Hanlon. He is Chief Executive Officer of the Bidwell Brook Foundation, and RI for a their childrens respite home. He carries out monthly inspections at Sesame in accordance with regulation 26. His reports show that he had reviewed fire safety, checked service user medication records, care records, cash accounts, and reviewed staff training. Feedback had been received from relatives and health professionals, but not yet collated or used to contribute to development of the service. Care Homes for Adults (18-65 years) Page 23 of 27 Evidence: A professional fire risk assessment had been carried out, and the alarm system had been professionally serviced in September 2009. Verbal instruction on fire safety had been given since then to new staff, by the manager, and a personal evacuation plan had been put in place for service users. The Manager agreed that professional fire safety training was needed. There were systems in place for checking other safety features in the home. Care Homes for Adults (18-65 years) Page 24 of 27 Are there any outstanding requirements from the last inspection? Yes £ No R Outstanding statutory requirements These are requirements that were set at the previous inspection, but have still not been met. They say what the registered person had to do to meet the Care Standards Act 2000, Care Homes Regulations 2001 and the National Minimum Standards. No. Standard Regulation Requirement Timescale for action Care Homes for Adults (18-65 years) Page 25 of 27 Requirements and recommendations from this inspection: Immediate requirements: These are immediate requirements that were set on the day we visited this care home. The registered person had to meet these within 48 hours. No. Standard Regulation Requirement Timescale for action Statutory requirements These requirements set out what the registered person must do to meet the Care Standards Act 2000, Care Homes Regulations 2001 and the National Minimum Standards. The registered person(s) must do this within the timescales we have set. No. Standard Regulation Requirement Timescale for action Recommendations These recommendations are taken from the best practice described in the National Minimum Standards and the registered person(s) should consider them as a way of improving their service. No Refer to Standard Good Practice Recommendations 1 7 We recommend that the service users are given the facility to safely keep their money and other valuables in their own room, with support, to promote their independence. We recommend that staff training in dealing with challenging behaviour and crisis intervention is provided, to ensure safety of people who live and people who work in the home. 2 35 Care Homes for Adults (18-65 years) Page 26 of 27 Helpline: Telephone: 03000 616161 Email: enquiries@cqc.org.uk Web: www.cqc.org.uk We want people to be able to access this information. If you would like a summary in a different format or language please contact our helpline or go to our website. Copyright © (2009) Care Quality Commission (CQC). This publication may be reproduced in whole or in part, free of charge, in any format or medium provided that it is not used for commercial gain. This consent is subject to the material being reproduced accurately and on proviso that it is not used in a derogatory manner or misleading context. The material should be acknowledged as CQC copyright, with the title and date of publication of the document specified. Care Homes for Adults (18-65 years) Page 27 of 27 - Please note that this information is included on www.bestcarehome.co.uk under license from the regulator. Re-publishing this information is in breach of the terms of use of that website. Discrete codes and changes have been inserted throughout the textual data shown on the site that will provide incontrovertable proof of copying in the event this information is re-published on other websites. The policy of www.bestcarehome.co.uk is to use all legal avenues to pursue such offenders, including recovery of costs. You have been warned!

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