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Care Home: 993 Oxford Road

  • 993 Oxford Road Tilehurst Reading Berkshire RG31 6TL
  • Tel: 01189453821
  • Fax: 01189415290
  • Planned feature Advertise here!

993 Oxford Road is a service, which provides twenty-four hour care for five adult, male service users who have learning and associated sensory disabilities. It is a two-storied building that is owned by a housing association and the care is provided by SENSE (a national charitable organisation). The home is located approximately ten minutes, by car, from Reading Town Centre and is within easy reach of several other towns, which increases the availability of a variety of leisure and community facilities. The home has its` own transport and is on a public transport route. The current fees range from £90,887.96 - £130,282 per year

  • Latitude: 51.47200012207
    Longitude: -1.0340000391006
  • Manager: Manager post vacant
  • Price p/w: ~
  • UK
  • Total Capacity: 5
  • Type: Care home only
  • Provider: Sense, The National Deafblind and Rubella Association
  • Ownership: Charity
  • Care Home ID: 1139
Residents Needs:
Learning disability

Latest Inspection

This is the latest available inspection report for this service, carried out on 12th December 2007. CSCI has not published a star rating for this report, though using similar criteria we estimate that the report is Good. The way we rate inspection reports is consistent for all houses, though please be aware that this may be different from an official CSCI judgement.

The inspector made no statutory requirements on the home as a result of this inspection and there were no outstanding actions from the previous inspection report.

For extracts, read the latest CQC inspection for 993 Oxford Road.

What the care home does well The home makes sure that the paperwork and records help staff to look after the residents well and as they prefer. Residents are helped to do as much for themselves as they can, in the safest way possible. People are helped to do lots of interesting things so that they can enjoy their lives as much as they can. Staff take people out and about in the area where they live so that they can feel like they belong there.Staff have good training so that they can look after all the residents` different needs in the best way possible. The manager is looking at ways to improve things for the residents so that they can enjoy their lives even more, in the future. What has improved since the last inspection? The home looks very nice and it must be more comfortable and better to live there. All the fire alarms are tested weekly so that everyone is sure that they work properly and are safe. What the care home could do better: The manager should look at who buys things for the residents` bedrooms and who makes those decisions so that it is clear that peoples` money is being spent properly and as they choose. The manager should also look at how peoples` money is recorded so that people can see quickly and easily what has been taken out of the bank and what it has been spent on. CARE HOME ADULTS 18-65 993 Oxford Road Tilehurst Reading Berkshire RG31 6TL Lead Inspector Kerry Kingston Unannounced Inspection 12 December 2007 10:30 th DS0000011060.V345451.R01.S.doc Version 5.2 Page 1 The Commission for Social Care Inspection aims to: • • • • Put the people who use social care first Improve services and stamp out bad practice Be an expert voice on social care Practise what we preach in our own organisation Reader Information Document Purpose Author Audience Further copies from Copyright Inspection Report CSCI General Public 0870 240 7535 (telephone order line) This report is copyright Commission for Social Care Inspection (CSCI) and may only be used in its entirety. Extracts may not be used or reproduced without the express permission of CSCI www.csci.org.uk Internet address DS0000011060.V345451.R01.S.doc Version 5.2 Page 2 This is a report of an inspection to assess whether services are meeting the needs of people who use them. The legal basis for conducting inspections is the Care Standards Act 2000 and the relevant National Minimum Standards for this establishment are those for Care Homes for Adults 18-65. They can be found at www.dh.gov.uk or obtained from The Stationery Office (TSO) PO Box 29, St Crispins, Duke Street, Norwich, NR3 1GN. Tel: 0870 600 5522. Online ordering: www.tso.co.uk/bookshop This report is a public document. Extracts may not be used or reproduced without the prior permission of the Commission for Social Care Inspection. DS0000011060.V345451.R01.S.doc Version 5.2 Page 3 SERVICE INFORMATION Name of service 993 Oxford Road Address Tilehurst Reading Berkshire RG31 6TL 0118 945 3821 0118 941 5290 cindy.owen@sense.org.uk www.sense.org.uk Sense, The National Deafblind and Rubella Association ****Post Vacant**** Care Home 5 Telephone number Fax number Email address Provider Web address Name of registered provider(s)/company (if applicable) Name of registered manager (if applicable) Type of registration No. of places registered (if applicable) Category(ies) of Learning disability (5) registration, with number of places DS0000011060.V345451.R01.S.doc Version 5.2 Page 4 SERVICE INFORMATION Conditions of registration: Date of last inspection 30th August 2006 Brief Description of the Service: 993 Oxford Road is a service, which provides twenty-four hour care for five adult, male service users who have learning and associated sensory disabilities. It is a two-storied building that is owned by a housing association and the care is provided by SENSE (a national charitable organisation). The home is located approximately ten minutes, by car, from Reading Town Centre and is within easy reach of several other towns, which increases the availability of a variety of leisure and community facilities. The home has its own transport and is on a public transport route. The current fees range from £90,887.96 - £130,282 per year DS0000011060.V345451.R01.S.doc Version 5.2 Page 5 SUMMARY This is an overview of what the inspector found during the inspection. This is a report for the key inspection of the service, which included a routine unannounced site visit. This took place between the hours of 10.30 am and 4.30pm on the 12th December 2007. The information was collected from the Annual Quality Assurance Assessment, a document sent to the service by the Commission for Social care Inspection and completed by the manager of the service, surveys were not sent to the home as the people who live there would not have been able to complete them, few people have any contact with families. Telephone calls were made to care management teams and an advocate but only one response could be obtained. The home is registered for five people and there are five people in residence, currently. Discussions with three staff members and the Manager took place. Most people who use the service have no or limited verbal skills and use their own unique methods of communication, therefore observation was also used as a source of information throughout the visit. Residents have severe sensory losses, some sight and hearing, others one or the other, in addition to their learning disability. A tour of the home and reviewing residents’ and other records were also used to collect information on the day of the visit. The manager is has been in post for approximately three months and all areas of care in the home are being developed to provide improving outcomes for residents. What the service does well: The home makes sure that the paperwork and records help staff to look after the residents well and as they prefer. Residents are helped to do as much for themselves as they can, in the safest way possible. People are helped to do lots of interesting things so that they can enjoy their lives as much as they can. Staff take people out and about in the area where they live so that they can feel like they belong there. DS0000011060.V345451.R01.S.doc Version 5.2 Page 6 Staff have good training so that they can look after all the residents’ different needs in the best way possible. The manager is looking at ways to improve things for the residents so that they can enjoy their lives even more, in the future. What has improved since the last inspection? What they could do better: Please contact the provider for advice of actions taken in response to this inspection. The report of this inspection is available from enquiries@csci.gsi.gov.uk or by contacting your local CSCI office. The summary of this inspection report can be made available in other formats on request. DS0000011060.V345451.R01.S.doc Version 5.2 Page 7 DETAILS OF INSPECTOR FINDINGS CONTENTS Choice of Home (Standards 1–5) Individual Needs and Choices (Standards 6-10) Lifestyle (Standards 11-17) Personal and Healthcare Support (Standards 18-21) Concerns, Complaints and Protection (Standards 22-23) Environment (Standards 24-30) Staffing (Standards 31-36) Conduct and Management of the Home (Standards 37 – 43) Scoring of Outcomes Statutory Requirements Identified During the Inspection DS0000011060.V345451.R01.S.doc Version 5.2 Page 8 Choice of Home The intended outcomes for Standards 1 – 5 are: 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. Prospective service users have the information they need to make an informed choice about where to live. Prospective users’ individual aspirations and needs are assessed. Prospective service users know that the home that they will choose will meet their needs and aspirations. Prospective service users have an opportunity to visit and to “test drive” the home. Each service user has an individual written contract or statement of terms and conditions with the home. The Commission consider Standard 2 the key standard to be inspected. JUDGEMENT – we looked at outcomes for the following standard(s): 2. People who use the service experience good quality outcomes in this area. The home would ensure that people are fully assessed prior to admission and would not admit anyone whose needs it could not meet. This judgement has been made using available evidence including a visit to this service. EVIDENCE: There have been no admissions since the last inspection in August 2006. Peoples care files showed that full assessments had been caried out, in the past and peoples care plans are reviewed regularly. The home has a robust admissions policy which includes usual admissions procedures. The manager has just completed an up-date of the Statement of Purpose for the home. DS0000011060.V345451.R01.S.doc Version 5.2 Page 9 Individual Needs and Choices The intended outcomes for Standards 6 – 10 are: 6. 7. 8. 9. 10. Service users know their assessed and changing needs and personal goals are reflected in their individual Plan. Service users make decisions about their lives with assistance as needed. Service users are consulted on, and participate in, all aspects of life in the home. Service users are supported to take risks as part of an independent lifestyle. Service users know that information about them is handled appropriately, and that their confidences are kept. The Commission considers Standards 6, 7 and 9 the key standards to be inspected. JUDGEMENT – we looked at outcomes for the following standard(s): 6,7 and 9. People experience good quality outcomes in this area. People who use the service have detailed care plans and are helped to make as many decisions about their lives as is possible. Activities are properly risk assessed to ensure residents independence and safety is maintained, as far as is possible. This judgement has been made using available evidence including a visit to this service. EVIDENCE: Three care plans were seen, they include full assessments for all areas of care. The care plans are of good quality being detailed and including equality and diversity issues, including gender sensitivity. The plans include peoples’ assessed and changing needs, how people are enabled to make decisions and how they communicate those decisions. Support plans and guidelines also note morning routines, personal care, DS0000011060.V345451.R01.S.doc Version 5.2 Page 10 what I like and don’t like and how I like things to be done, teeth cleaning, personality, behaviour, relationships, sexuality, domestic skills, mobility, eating and drinking, mealtimes, normal routine and bathing routine. Care plans are formally reviewed every six months by a multi disciplinary panel, all interested parties are invited although most attend annually, changing needs and goals are noted at the end of the review process. Monthly summaries are generally completed by key workers, they include a review of health and well being, outings and activities and behaviour and result in an action plan for the following month based on goals identified at the six month review. Detailed guidelines about most areas of care, including peoples choices about very intimate areas of their life, are included in care planning these show a commitment to promoting peoples’ equality and rights. More detailed guidelines are needed to ensure people with some challenging behaviours are managed as consistently and safely as possible. The Manager advised that guidelines for the person with the most challenging behaviour had been in place but they could not be located on the day of the visit. There was evidence that the individual has input from a psychiatrist and has had behavioural assessments in the past. The manager agreed that the up-date of this individuals’ care plan would be a priority. Staff spoken to had good knowledge about the individuals’ behaviour and needs. Risk assessments are in place, as appropriate to the needs of the individuals for all aspects of their care. These are supported by clear and detailed guidelines to ensure that people are protected but able to be as independent, as possible. Risk assessments seen were up-to-date with a review date of April 2008 on most, dates differed for individuals and the assessments are dependant on the needs of individuals. The manager confirmed that the risk of drowning or scalding forms part of the bathing risk assessments. DS0000011060.V345451.R01.S.doc Version 5.2 Page 11 Lifestyle The intended outcomes for Standards 11 - 17 are: 11. 12. 13. 14. 15. 16. 17. Service users have opportunities for personal development. Service users are able to take part in age, peer and culturally appropriate activities. Service users are part of the local community. Service users engage in appropriate leisure activities. Service users have appropriate personal, family and sexual relationships. Service users’ rights are respected and responsibilities recognised in their daily lives. Service users are offered a healthy diet and enjoy their meals and mealtimes. The Commission considers Standards 12, 13, 15, 16 and 17 the key standards to be inspected. JUDGEMENT – we looked at outcomes for the following standard(s): 12,13,15,16 and 17. People who use the service experience good quality outcomes in this area. Peole are helped to enjoy their lifestyle as much as possible by being supported to pursue varied activities and accessing the local community regularly. Most residents have little contact with their families but the home ensure those links that exist are encouraged and maintained. Menus seen offered people a healthy and nutritious diet. This judgement has been made using available evidence including a visit to this service. DS0000011060.V345451.R01.S.doc Version 5.2 Page 12 EVIDENCE: Activity programmes for all people who use the service were seen,each individual has a programme tailored to their needs and choices of activities, the overall programme of activities is displayed on the office wall. Activities pursued by individuals are noted in residents daily diaries and were seen to include swimming, jacuzzi, college, music group, shopping, football matches, meals out, drives and using the sensory room. Daily diaries also included peoples participation in the day -to-day tasks of the house such as helping to vacuum their bedrooms and assisting with cooking in the kitchen. The activities cross reference with the monthly summaries that set goals for the following month such as outings, or holidays or new activities to try for an individual. Residents have been or are going on holidays this year, one went in November and the key worker had completed a holiday diary of the events and activities. The home are trying to devlop ways of making these communication tools more meaningful for those with sensory disabilities. They have a sensory room for all to use and individual feely boxes, as appropriate to the diverse needs displayed by individuals. Records showed that residents accessed the community very regularly, on the day of the visit one person was taken out walking, others remained in the house because they had been unwell. One person was seen working with bricks, one was sitting alone most of the time but staff expalined his mood and communication systems and were very alert to his needs. The home is working with Oxford Social Services Sensory team to get new ideas with regard to ways to communicate and enhance the lifestyle of those with major sensory loss. Few of the residents have any family contacts but any contact with family or friends is noted on daily notes, the home facilitate and encourage contact where possible. Three staff spoken with were able to describe how they respect people when helping with care even if they have major sensory loss, such as ensuring they retain their dignity in the community and during personal care activities and personal pleasures. They try to ensure that they communicate with them as DS0000011060.V345451.R01.S.doc Version 5.2 Page 13 much as possible by various methods including touch and sign, this is an area that the new manager is trying to devlop. Menus showed that food is varied and nutritious, residents participate in shopping expeditions and their likes and dislikes are considered when menu planning. The menu works on a three week rotating basis that is changed every sixth week. Because of the sensory and learning disablities that the residents have trial and error are the most effective means of introducing new foods and staff carefully observe peoples’ reactions to determine if they like the food that they are given. DS0000011060.V345451.R01.S.doc Version 5.2 Page 14 Personal and Healthcare Support The intended outcomes for Standards 18 - 21 are: 18. 19. 20. 21. Service users receive personal support in the way they prefer and require. Service users’ physical and emotional health needs are met. Service users retain, administer and control their own medication where appropriate, and are protected by the home’s policies and procedures for dealing with medicines. The ageing, illness and death of a service user are handled with respect and as the individual would wish. The Commission considers Standards 18, 19, and 20 the key standards to be inspected. JUDGEMENT – we looked at outcomes for the following standard(s): 18,19 and 20. People who use the service experience good quality outcomes in this area. People’s physical and emotional needs are well met, in the way that they prefer. Their diverse needs with regard to communication and sensory loss are identified and addressed in personal care and healthcare plans. Medication is used only when necessary to the well being of the individual and is adminsistered as safely as it can be. This judgement has been made using available evidence including a visit to this service. EVIDENCE: Care plans for three people were looked at they are person centred and the six month reviews are called person centred meetings. The care plans are developed from the meetings and inlude peoples likes,dislikes and preferences. They are detailed with regard to most areas of care, usual daily routines tell staff how to offer people care and how they prefer it to be offered. DS0000011060.V345451.R01.S.doc Version 5.2 Page 15 Individuals have communication profiles to help staff to understand what peoples behaviours or communication methods mean. Sensory loss means that peoples’ needs are very specialised and staff have to be creative in finding ways of communicating effectively, they are ,currently working with another agnecy to develop this area of work. Another professional said that it was a ‘comitted staff team who do lots of activities with the residents but there needs to be more focus on individual development, it was noted that the staff team are willing to work with other professionals to improve this aspect of care’. Care plans include healthcare needs and there is a file that details healthcare appointments and specialist consultations. Some health files are not up to date but there is evidence that all residents recieve regular healthcare, as necessary and have routine dental and eye checks. All residents had their medication reviewed in 2007 and several changes were made by the Doctor to longstanding medication. The home is developing Health Action Plans, which describe people’s healthcare needs and can be taken to hospital or medical consultations to help provide good information and promote understanding and quality healthcare for the individual. Health records and notes are available but records are repetitious and kept in various locations, the manager advised that health records are being up-dated and reviewed, currently. The home uses the Boots Monitored Dosage System to assist them to aminister the medication accurately and safely, all staff receive training before they administer medication and most staff training was up dated in 2007. Medication records seen were accurate, there was a discussion about developing guidelines for the administration of medication described when necessary by the Doctor, this currently is the homely remedy of paracetemol but residents have communication difficulties and may find it diffciult to express their pain or distress. DS0000011060.V345451.R01.S.doc Version 5.2 Page 16 Concerns, Complaints and Protection The intended outcomes for Standards 22 – 23 are: 22. 23. Service users feel their views are listened to and acted on. Service users are protected from abuse, neglect and self-harm. The Commission considers Standards 22, and 23 the key standards to be inspected. JUDGEMENT – we looked at outcomes for the following standard(s): 22 and 23. People who use the service experience good quality outcomes in this area. The home ensures that they are alert to residents if they are not hapoy and rectify any issues that are causing concern. Staff, generally ensure that people are protected from all forms of abuse but there are some areas relating to finances that could be improved to ensure more robust protection for people. This judgement has been made using available evidence including a visit to this service. EVIDENCE: The complaints book noted two complaints from neighbours and adressed directly by staff in the home, the manager advised that the recording process is being changed to make it clear the action that has been taken. Staff meeting minutes showed that complaints had formed part of a recent staff meeting and staff had been asked to read and sign the procedure to confirm that they understood it. Residents would be not to be able to use the procedure without assistance and staff described how they would become aware of people who were unhappy or distressed in any way. Staff spoken to were aware of the procedure and also of an organisational helpline that they could acess if they had any concerns or issues. DS0000011060.V345451.R01.S.doc Version 5.2 Page 17 Staff were confident that the organisation would act upon any information, complaints or concerns recieved. Staff have all recieved safeguarding adults training from the organisation and the manager said that it is very good quality training. The home has a copy of the Local Authoritys Protection of Vulnerable Adults procedures which was not prominently displayed during the visit but the manager rectified this at the end of the visit, he has also added it as an item on the next staff meeting in January 2008 to ensure that staff are aware of it and are able to follow it if necessary. Staff spoken to were aware of their role in protecting the people in their care and appropriately, described how they would deal with a safeguarding concern. They were not as clear about the local inter agnecy procedures but this will be rectified in January 2008. The Commission for Social Care Inspection recieved (anonymously) some concerns about the home, in October 2006 ,these were properly dealt with by the organisation, the new manager is aware of the issues and the action plan that was developed by the organisation to adress any founded issues that the concerns raised. The Commisssion has recievd no further information with regard to complaints or safeguarding adults concerns about this service. Two residents finances were looked at and the cash records were accurate, there was discussion about the methods of recording with regard to easily following bank withdrawals and subsequent expenditure. The issue was also raised that residents had bought their own beds, bedroom furniture and some bed linen, there was no recorded evidence that the residents had chosen to do this, this could be seen as discriminatory depending on the financial status of individuals and the manager agreed to review this practice immediately. DS0000011060.V345451.R01.S.doc Version 5.2 Page 18 Environment The intended outcomes for Standards 24 – 30 are: 24. 25. 26. 27. 28. 29. 30. Service users live in a homely, comfortable and safe environment. Service users’ bedrooms suit their needs and lifestyles. Service users’ bedrooms promote their independence. Service users’ toilets and bathrooms provide sufficient privacy and meet their individual needs. Shared spaces complement and supplement service users’ individual rooms. Service users have the specialist equipment they require to maximise their independence. The home is clean and hygienic. The Commission considers Standards 24, and 30 the key standards to be inspected. JUDGEMENT – we looked at outcomes for the following standard(s): 24 and 30. People who use the service experience good outcomes in this area. The house is comfortable and homely, it is a pleasant environment and there are ongoing improvements to make it even more suited to the needs of the individual residents. This judgement has been made using available evidence including a visit to this service. EVIDENCE: The home is well kept and maintained and there has been alot of work done to improve the environment. Communal areas have been redecorated and carpets have been replaced throughout the home. Residents bedrooms have been redecorated and contain very good quality furniture and fittings, that meet the diverse needs of the individuals. DS0000011060.V345451.R01.S.doc Version 5.2 Page 19 The sensory room has been decorated and redesigned and is now a comfortable and interesting area that the residents use continually. The first floor bathroom and kitchen have some broken tiles that may compromise the staffs ability to maintain hygiene standards if there is further deterioration, the manager advised that he has included these areas on his budget bid for next year. The house was seen to be clean and tidy and presented as a pleasant environment for the people who live there, the manager described plans for further individualising peoples rooms and the communal areas to meet their sensory needs. DS0000011060.V345451.R01.S.doc Version 5.2 Page 20 Staffing The intended outcomes for Standards 31 – 36 are: 31. 32. 33. 34. 35. 36. Service users benefit from clarity of staff roles and responsibilities. Service users are supported by competent and qualified staff. Service users are supported by an effective staff team. Service users are supported and protected by the home’s recruitment policy and practices. Service users’ individual and joint needs are met by appropriately trained staff. Service users benefit from well supported and supervised staff. The Commission considers Standards 32, 34 and 35 the key standards to be inspected. JUDGEMENT – we looked at outcomes for the following standard(s): 32,34 and 35. People who use the service experience good quality outcomes in this area. The staff team are properly trained, well qualified and able to meet the diverse and special needs of the residents. They are well supported by the management team to ensure that they work to good standards. The recruitment process, generally, ensures that staff are safe to work with vulnerable people prior to their appointment. This judgement has been made using available evidence including a visit to this service. EVIDENCE: The home has a minimum of three staff per daytime shift, one waking night staff and one person sleeping in to help the night staff, if necessary. The manager works a least one shift per week and the deputy works four shifts per week. The home has three vacancies, currently, the hours are covered by staff doing additional hours or bank staff, very few agency staff are used to ensure that DS0000011060.V345451.R01.S.doc Version 5.2 Page 21 residents have continuity of care. Their needs are very special and it takes people along time to get to know new staff. There are eight full time and six part time staff members, robust communcation systems such as a communication book, home diary and half hour handovers ensure the home is run efficiently and in the interests of the residents. Four staff left the home prior to the new manager taking up post and one has left since, the recruitemnt drive recently done by the manager resulted in no suitable candidates, at this time. Nine of the fourteen staff, currently in post have N.V.Q.2 or above qualifications and training records showed that most of the Health and Safety courses were up-to-date or booked . Staff confirmed that the organisation afforded good opportunities for training, including professional qualifications. All staff have a ten day induction and their understanding of the topics covered are tested by means of a written format in an induction book. Staff spoken to had a good understanding of peoples needs and communication systems and were seen to treat them with sensitivity and respect (such as the staff member who showed me in introducing me to all the residents who were in the lounge). Staff confirmed that they have monthly staff meetings, montghly supervision meetings and annual appraisals, they felt supported and one said that things had got better since the new manager had taken up post. Some staff were particulalry pleased that they had been given additional responsibilities and were being encouraged to think for themselves. The two newest staffs recruitment records were seen, the procedure is robust but there was discussion about ensuring the quality and validity of references as some references were from colleagues and one was written to whom it may concern. DS0000011060.V345451.R01.S.doc Version 5.2 Page 22 Conduct and Management of the Home The intended outcomes for Standards 37 – 43 are: 37. 38. 39. 40. 41. 42. 43. Service users benefit from a well run home. Service users benefit from the ethos, leadership and management approach of the home. Service users are confident their views underpin all self-monitoring, review and development by the home. Service users’ rights and best interests are safeguarded by the home’s policies and procedures. Service users’ rights and best interests are safeguarded by the home’s record keeping policies and procedures. The health, safety and welfare of service users are promoted and protected. Service users benefit from competent and accountable management of the service. The Commission considers Standards 37, 39, and 42 the key standards to be inspected. JUDGEMENT – we looked at outcomes for the following standard(s): 37,39 and 42. People who use the service experience good quality outcomes in this area. The home is well managed, in the best ineterests of the people who live there. The newly appointed manager is developing many areas of the home to ensure that residents experience improved outcomes in those areas. The home monitors the quality of care it offers and keeps people who live there as safe as possible. This judgement has been made using available evidence including a visit to this service. EVIDENCE: The new manager has been in post for approximately three months, he has applied to the Commision for registration. He has fifteen years experience in related work and approximately six months as a registered manager in a local authority setting. DS0000011060.V345451.R01.S.doc Version 5.2 Page 23 He has an N.V.Q. 3 qualification and he advised that the organisation is affording him the opportunity to complete an N.V.Q. 4 and Registered Managers Award. The manager has good knowledge of the service, including budgetting and people management and has many areas under development such as healthcare plans, recording systems (complaints), staff developemnt and environmental improvements. The formal Quality assurance system was completed in 2006 and there is evidence that many of the issues identified, such as environmental improvements, increase in educational activities for residents, identifying cultural needs and ethnicity, improved communication and staff training had been developed and are being further improved. A sample of Health and Safety maintenance and test records were seen, all were up-to-date. The home also has an emergency information file that includes plans of the house, how to turn of mains services and who to contact in case of emergency. The home has a monthly Health and Safety audit that is recorded to ensure everything is as safe as possible. Incident and accident records are kept but need to include action taken to avoid recurrence (as much as possible). COSHH statements are available and some safe working practice risk assessments were seen. DS0000011060.V345451.R01.S.doc Version 5.2 Page 24 SCORING OF OUTCOMES This page summarises the assessment of the extent to which the National Minimum Standards for Care Homes for Adults 18-65 have been met and uses the following scale. The scale ranges from: 4 Standard Exceeded 2 Standard Almost Met (Commendable) (Minor Shortfalls) 3 Standard Met 1 Standard Not Met (No Shortfalls) (Major Shortfalls) “X” in the standard met box denotes standard not assessed on this occasion “N/A” in the standard met box denotes standard not applicable CHOICE OF HOME Standard No Score 1 X 2 3 3 X 4 X 5 X INDIVIDUAL NEEDS AND CHOICES Standard No 6 7 8 9 10 Score CONCERNS AND COMPLAINTS Standard No Score 22 3 23 2 ENVIRONMENT Standard No Score 24 3 25 X 26 X 27 X 28 X 29 X 30 3 STAFFING Standard No Score 31 X 32 3 33 X 34 3 35 3 36 X CONDUCT AND MANAGEMENT OF THE HOME Standard No 37 38 39 40 41 42 43 Score 3 3 X 3 X LIFESTYLES Standard No Score 11 X 12 4 13 4 14 3 15 3 16 3 17 3 PERSONAL AND HEALTHCARE SUPPORT Standard No 18 19 20 21 Score 3 3 3 X 2 X 3 X X 3 X DS0000011060.V345451.R01.S.doc Version 5.2 Page 25 NONE Are there any outstanding requirements from the last inspection? STATUTORY REQUIREMENTS This section sets out the actions, which must be taken so that the registered person/s meets the Care Standards Act 2000, Care Homes Regulations 2001 and the National Minimum Standards. The Registered Provider(s) must comply with the given timescales. No. Standard Regulation Requirement Timescale for action RECOMMENDATIONS These recommendations relate to National Minimum Standards and are seen as good practice for the Registered Provider/s to consider carrying out. No. 1. 2. Refer to Standard YA6 YA23 Good Practice Recommendations To produce more detailed behavioural guidelines to help people to control behaviours that may cause distress to themselves or others. To review the recording system for peoples’ finances, so that everyone can see what money as been taken out of peoples’ bank accounts and where it has gone. To review the practice of people paying for their own bedroom furniture and linens to ensure that they are choosing to spend their personal money as they wish. DS0000011060.V345451.R01.S.doc Version 5.2 Page 26 Commission for Social Care Inspection The Oast Hermitage Court Hermitage Lane Maidstone ME16 9NT National Enquiry Line: Telephone: 0845 015 0120 or 0191 233 3323 Textphone: 0845 015 2255 or 0191 233 3588 Email: enquiries@csci.gsi.gov.uk Web: www.csci.org.uk © This report is copyright Commission for Social Care Inspection (CSCI) and may only be used in its entirety. Extracts may not be used or reproduced without the express permission of CSCI DS0000011060.V345451.R01.S.doc Version 5.2 Page 27 - Please note that this information is included on www.bestcarehome.co.uk under license from the regulator. Re-publishing this information is in breach of the terms of use of that website. 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