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Care Home: Eccleston Court

  • Holme Road Eccleston St Helens WA10 5NW
  • Tel: 01744453655
  • Fax: 01744731382

Eccleston Court care home is situated in a residential community, although it is surrounded by pleasant countryside to include woods and waterside views. The home comprises of two separate units both accommodating people with varying nursing needs. Public transport routes are fairly accessible to access local amenities. Eccleston court is purpose built to accommodate the needs of older people. Design features include alarmed exit doors, single level flooring with external access, grab rails and all adaptations in communal areas, bathrooms and toilets. Accommodation is provided in single story buildings in two separate units with 34 bedroom in Eccleston Court unit and 16 bedrooms in Haydock Court unit. Both units are in close proximity and are staffed independently. All bedrooms have en-suite facilities and lounge, dining and sitting areas are provided as communal space for the people living in the home. Community Integrated care (CIC) have recently taken over as registered providers of the home and Haydock Unit is not currently in use.

  • Latitude: 53.449001312256
    Longitude: -2.7690000534058
  • Manager: Karen Witterick
  • Price p/w: -
  • UK
  • Total Capacity: 50
  • Type: Care home with nursing
  • Provider: Community Integrated Care
  • Ownership: Voluntary
  • Care Home ID: 5820
Residents Needs:
Old age, not falling within any other category, Dementia

Previous Inspections

This may not be the latest inspection for this service as we are having techinical problems updating from CQC - please check directly on the regulators website for the most recent report; bestcarehome hopes to be back to regular updates shortly.

For extracts, read the latest CQC inspection for Eccleston Court.

CARE HOMES FOR OLDER PEOPLE Eccleston Court Holme Road Eccleston St Helens WA10 5NW Lead Inspector Lynn Paterson Key Unannounced Inspection 18th March 2008 09:10 X10015.doc Version 1.40 Page 1 The Commission for Social Care Inspection aims to: • • • • Put the people who use social care first Improve services and stamp out bad practice Be an expert voice on social care Practise what we preach in our own organisation Reader Information Document Purpose Author Audience Further copies from Copyright Inspection Report CSCI General Public 0870 240 7535 (telephone order line) This report is copyright Commission for Social Care Inspection (CSCI) and may only be used in its entirety. Extracts may not be used or reproduced without the express permission of CSCI www.csci.org.uk Internet address Eccleston Court DS0000070882.V357745.R01.S.doc Version 5.2 Page 2 This is a report of an inspection to assess whether services are meeting the needs of people who use them. The legal basis for conducting inspections is the Care Standards Act 2000 and the relevant National Minimum Standards for this establishment are those for Care Homes for Older People. They can be found at www.dh.gov.uk or obtained from The Stationery Office (TSO) PO Box 29, St Crispins, Duke Street, Norwich, NR3 1GN. Tel: 0870 600 5522. Online ordering: www.tso.co.uk/bookshop This report is a public document. Extracts may not be used or reproduced without the prior permission of the Commission for Social Care Inspection. Eccleston Court DS0000070882.V357745.R01.S.doc Version 5.2 Page 3 SERVICE INFORMATION Name of service Eccleston Court Address Holme Road Eccleston St Helens WA10 5NW Telephone number Fax number Email address Provider Web address Name of registered provider(s)/company (if applicable) Name of registered manager (if applicable) Type of registration No. of places registered (if applicable) 0151 420 3637 www.c-i-c.co.uk. Community Integrated Care vacant post Care Home 50 Category(ies) of Dementia (16), Old age, not falling within any registration, with number other category (34) of places Eccleston Court DS0000070882.V357745.R01.S.doc Version 5.2 Page 4 SERVICE INFORMATION Conditions of registration: 1. The registered person may provide the following categories of service only. Care home with Nursing - code N to people of the following gender:Either. Whose primary care needs on admission to the home are within the following categories: Old age not falling within any other category - Code OP (maximum number of places: 34) Dementia - Code DE (Maximum number of places: 16) The maximum number of people who can be accommodated is: 50 Date of last inspection New service Brief Description of the Service: Eccleston Court care home is situated in a residential community, although it is surrounded by pleasant countryside to include woods and waterside views. The home comprises of two separate units both accommodating people with varying nursing needs. Public transport routes are fairly accessible to access local amenities. Eccleston court is purpose built to accommodate the needs of older people. Design features include alarmed exit doors, single level flooring with external access, grab rails and all adaptations in communal areas, bathrooms and toilets. Accommodation is provided in single story buildings in two separate units with 34 bedroom in Eccleston Court unit and 16 bedrooms in Haydock Court unit. Both units are in close proximity and are staffed independently. All bedrooms have en-suite facilities and lounge, dining and sitting areas are provided as communal space for the people living in the home. Community Integrated care (CIC) have recently taken over as registered providers of the home and Haydock Unit is not currently in use. Eccleston Court DS0000070882.V357745.R01.S.doc Version 5.2 Page 5 SUMMARY This is an overview of what the inspector found during the inspection. The quality rating for this service is 2 star. This means the people who use this service experience good quality outcomes. The inspection of Eccleston Court was carried out on 18th march 2008 and was undertaken on an unannounced basis. Information about the care home was obtained through a pre-inspection questionnaire, have your say questionnaires returned from people who live in the home and their representatives and examination of the homes policies, procedures and supporting documentation. Discussions took place with people living in the home, their family and friends, the manager and her deputy and members of the staff team. A tour of the building also took place. All of the Key standards were covered in this inspection information of which, is detailed in the report. Feedback was given to the manager at the end of the site visit. The arrangements for equality and diversity were discussed during the visit and are detailed throughout this report. Particular emphasis was placed on the methods utilised to determine individual needs, promote independence and support people to make informed decisions in line with individual choices. Fees £600.00 per week. What the service does well: The home has recently changed ownership and the staff are in the process of changing policies, practices and documentation in line with the new organisational procedures. This has been done quickly and efficiently to ensure records are clear and staff are able to continue to follow care plans as appropriate to need. Record show that people who wish to live in the home are fully assessed prior to being offered accommodation to ensure that the staff and equipment of the home is suitable to meet all assessed need. Eccleston Court DS0000070882.V357745.R01.S.doc Version 5.2 Page 6 Staffs say they enjoyed their work and they are well supported in their role. Visitors to the home say they have found the transfer of the home to the new ownership CIC to be a seamless process, which did not adversely upset any of the people living in the home. People living in the home say they are generally happy with the services provided and comments include“I get very good care and attention at all times” “The staff are all good to me and help me in any way they can” “I enjoy my food and look forward to meal times” “It’s always been a clean and well run nursing home”. The standard of décor and the cleanliness of the home create a most homely environment for the people living therein. What has improved since the last inspection? What they could do better: The home has recently been taken over by CIC and as a consequence new polices, procedures and practices are being introduced. Whist it was noted that staff have worked very hard to implement CIC documentation care plans did not hold signatures of the people they represented to show that they had been completed in partnership. Fourteen of eighteen residents spoken with were uncertain if they had a plan of care or care file and it is therefore essential that all documentation holds signatures of the people involved or their representative to show that any care and support carried out has been discussed and agreed prior to action. Observations of staff carrying out their various remits during the morning shift identified that they worked extremely hard to meet the needs of the people living in the home and visitors to the home expressed the opinion that staff were excellent in managing their duties to care and support 34 people. Eccleston Court DS0000070882.V357745.R01.S.doc Version 5.2 Page 7 Residents comments about staff were positive and identified that staff were very much appreciated for their kindness and professionalism. However some people living in the home and their representatives said that staffing levels did not enable staff to sit and talk and sometimes people had to wait a while before being assisted to the toilet. Assisted feeding was another area in which concerns were expressed about the amount of staff available to carry out this task. Discussions with the manager revealed that she utilises nursing staff and activities co-ordinators to assist people with their meals where necessary and she felt the staffing levels were adequate to enable staff to provide full care and support for the people living in Eccleston Court. However it is essential that meals, care and support be provided in a way that is timely and demonstrates respect and dignity to people who because of their disability have to rely on staff to assist them. Please contact the provider for advice of actions taken in response to this inspection. The report of this inspection is available from enquiries@csci.gsi.gov.uk or by contacting your local CSCI office. The summary of this inspection report can be made available in other formats on request. Eccleston Court DS0000070882.V357745.R01.S.doc Version 5.2 Page 8 DETAILS OF INSPECTOR FINDINGS CONTENTS Choice of Home (Standards 1–6) Health and Personal Care (Standards 7-11) Daily Life and Social Activities (Standards 12-15) Complaints and Protection (Standards 16-18) Environment (Standards 19-26) Staffing (Standards 27-30) Management and Administration (Standards 31-38) Scoring of Outcomes Statutory Requirements Identified During the Inspection Eccleston Court DS0000070882.V357745.R01.S.doc Version 5.2 Page 9 Choice of Home The intended outcomes for Standards 1 – 6 are: 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. Prospective service users have the information they need to make an informed choice about where to live. Each service user has a written contract/ statement of terms and conditions with the home. No service user moves into the home without having had his/her needs assessed and been assured that these will be met. Service users and their representatives know that the home they enter will meet their needs. Prospective service users and their relatives and friends have an opportunity to visit and assess the quality, facilities and suitability of the home. Service users assessed and referred solely for intermediate care are helped to maximise their independence and return home. The Commission considers Standards 3 and 6 the key standards to be inspected. JUDGEMENT – we looked at outcomes for the following standard(s): 3.6.Quality in this outcome area is good. This judgement has been made using available evidence including a visit to this service. People are only provided with a placement at the home after their needs are assessed and they have been assured these needs will be met. EVIDENCE: An assessment of the residents care needs is carried out prior to admission to ensure staffs has all the information they need to provide full needs led care and support. The manager advised that prior to any person moving in to the home, a senior nurse will conduct a home/hospital visit to the prospective residents and their family to carry out a pre-admission assessment to determine their health, social and mental health needs including any personal requests around individual needs and choice. Staff say they also assess if any specialist equipment is required. Eccleston Court DS0000070882.V357745.R01.S.doc Version 5.2 Page 10 The manager said that emergency admissions are not generally undertaken. However in such circumstances the manager or senior nurse will endeavour to make a visit to ensure that the move takes place as smoothly as possible. Records viewed held information of a new admission to the home on the day of the inspection. Records identified that the full pre assessment process had been carried out and the new resident was observed being admitted to the home along and s/he was accompanied by family. They confirmed that a full assessment had been sensitively undertaken and they had been provided with full details of the aims, objectives and services provided at Ecceslton Court. Intermediate care is not provided at Eccleston Court. Eccleston Court DS0000070882.V357745.R01.S.doc Version 5.2 Page 11 Health and Personal Care The intended outcomes for Standards 7 – 11 are: 7. 8. 9. 10. 11. The service user’s health, personal and social care needs are set out in an individual plan of care. Service users’ health care needs are fully met. Service users, where appropriate, are responsible for their own medication, and are protected by the home’s policies and procedures for dealing with medicines. Service users feel they are treated with respect and their right to privacy is upheld. Service users are assured that at the time of their death, staff will treat them and their family with care, sensitivity and respect. The Commission considers Standards 7, 8, 9 and 10 the key standards to be inspected. JUDGEMENT – we looked at outcomes for the following standard(s): 7.8.9.10.Quality in this outcome area is good This judgement has been made using available evidence including a visit to this service. Residents’ social and health care needs are monitored and met, however care plans need to be signed by the resident to whom they refer to ensure empowerment and choice. EVIDENCE: A documented plan of care and support is provided to each person living in the home to give guidance to staff on individual care needs and how these needs will be met. The home has a “Care plan & Record Keeping Protocol” a copy of which is contained in individual care files and its content is excellent. This protocol states what each care plan should contain, the Do’s and Don’ts of rerecording practices and says that written consent must be obtained form all people who use the service and/or their representatives to show that they have been completed in partnership and are a true record of what the resident wants/needs. Eccleston Court DS0000070882.V357745.R01.S.doc Version 5.2 Page 12 Care plans viewed were clear easy to read and well managed, however they did not include any signatures of the people they referred to. The manager revealed that this process occurs however because they had been revising the documentation to adhere to CIC protocols the signatures had not yet been inserted. The manager is an experienced and knowledgeable professional and accepts that this has been an oversight. She immediately set up systems to ensure that all people living in the home were shown the new documentation and was able to digest the details and provide signatures as appropriate. The manager advised that the full range of issues relating to quality and diversity such as residents age, disability, gender, race, religion or belief, heritage and sexuality need to be explicitly addressed during the care planning process to ensure that the holistic needs of the pole living in the home are fully addressed. Care plan were well presented and held an index to identify where differing information was held. Six plans were examined in detail and identified that all holistic needs had been recorded, monitored, reviewed and actioned, as appropriate. Discussions with people living in the home and information via returned comment cards confirmed that staff, treat them very well and their dignity and privacy is always upheld. Comments included“They are so good to me and respect that I am a little shy about some things so do things in a way that I want” “The staff are marvellous and respect me for what I am”. Staff spoken with identified they had received much training in care practices and knew how to treat people with respect and uphold their dignity. Staff observed carrying out their various duties showed they valued each resident as an individual with individual needs and carried out their care and support accordingly. Systems are in place to ensure residents receive their medication as prescribed by their GP and only qualified nursing staff is allowed to handle residents medication. Residents spoken with said they received their medication on time and provided by staff who are always cheerful and kind. Medication records were viewed, storage facilities and examined and systems for administering medication explained by a knowledgeable and experienced member of the nursing staff. Eccleston Court DS0000070882.V357745.R01.S.doc Version 5.2 Page 13 Eccleston Court DS0000070882.V357745.R01.S.doc Version 5.2 Page 14 Daily Life and Social Activities The intended outcomes for Standards 12 - 15 are: 12. 13. 14. 15. Service users find the lifestyle experienced in the home matches their expectations and preferences, and satisfies their social, cultural, religious and recreational interests and needs. Service users maintain contact with family/ friends/ representatives and the local community as they wish. Service users are helped to exercise choice and control over their lives. Service users receive a wholesome appealing balanced diet in pleasing surroundings at times convenient to them. The Commission considers all of the above key standards to be inspected. JUDGEMENT – we looked at outcomes for the following standard(s): 112.13.14.15.Quality in this outcome area is good. This judgement has been made using available evidence including a visit to this service. The homes routines are flexible, choices of food provided and residents can exercise full choices about their daily lives. EVIDENCE: Staff and people living in the home said a wide -range of activities is carried out within the home and it was noted that 2 activity co-ordinators are employed to facilitate these activities. The social care needs of the people living in the home are assessed and activities arranged accordingly. Care files identified activities undertaken by people living in the home and also those that had been offered and refused. These records show that activities and interests are provided with full consideration being taken of the choices, hobbies and capabilities of all the people living in the home. They also show that everybody is asked if they wish to participate and are given full choices to say yes or no. Residents said they had played Bingo that morning with the lucky winners being presented with Easter eggs. Other events held in the home included a Clothing Party, Easter egg hunt, library service, spring entertainment and quiz. Eccleston Court DS0000070882.V357745.R01.S.doc Version 5.2 Page 15 Residents said that those who have the capacity go out into the community. They advised that a religious minister visits the home each week and arrangements can be made for people to attend church if they wish. One or two residents said they did not participate in any activity at the moment as they did not feel capable or interested but they acknowledged that the home made sure there was “something to do each day”. People living in the home said they could go about their day as they wished with little restriction in place. ”Can do what we want, when we want, with who we want”. A varied menu is in place and residents said the chef was wonderful and she provided excellent meals. They said they always had plenty to eat and drink and the food was always well presented. The manager, chef and people living in the home advised that because of the changeover of ownership the menus had been looked at and decisions made to vary them a little with regard to nutritional content. As a consequence the new menus had just commenced and residents had been asked to comment about the changes. At the time of the visit I dined with the residents. The lunch menu was soup/fruit juice- Bacon scallops/pork in apricot sauce, and a choice off the sweet trolley. I had Bacon scallops, chips and green beans a meal, which was well presented, Well- cooked and absolutely delicious. One of my dining companions had the same meal and said she thoroughly enjoyed it. Another resident requested pork in apricot sauce and said whilst it looked good it was not to his/her taste. General discussion with the residents after the meal concluded that they feel the meals are always very good and the chefs baking is second to none. They say they will note their likes and dislikes from the new menu and “have their say” at the next residents meeting. The chef advised that she would also observe “what is eaten and what is not” and make her own suggestions for change as a consequence. The kitchen was well managed and in an excellent state of hygiene and the chef was noted to have full knowledge of all the residents dietary needs, likes and dislikes, even to their choice of soup. The dining areas currently used are divided into two separate areas of the home; one of the areas is a main thoroughfare to the resident’s bedrooms. Visitors were seen coming and going whilst the residents were dining. It was also noted that care staff as well as serving meals to residents in the dining rooms were undertaking assisted feeding for the people who could not feed themselves and this process began half an hour before the main meal was Eccleston Court DS0000070882.V357745.R01.S.doc Version 5.2 Page 16 provided for other residents. It was noted that 2 care staff was provided on each unit to carry out this practice, with one care staff member being used as a float. Staffs were assisting residents in a polite and discreet manner. 2 residents who needed extensive assistance with feeding were noted to being assisted by family and friends and this process took about forty minutes. Some other residents ate their meals in their rooms and staff, were also needed to assist with the meal delivery and any help that may be required. Comments from residents, their family and friends and staff of the home confirmed that staff, are very busy at mealtimes to ensure they meet the needs of the people living in the home. Comments from family and friends of residents included – “The staff are excellent but cannot in all places at the same time” “Look at the way s/he eats, it takes over half and hour just to get him/her to eat this little amount, I don’t know how s/he would get on if I was not here top assist. The staff would not have the time. This was discussed with the manager who advised that prior to the changeover staffing levels had been higher but the staff ratio was now at the recommended level. She said that other staff were utilised with assisted feeding when needed. These staff included nursing staff, and activities coordinators. The manager also advised that it is her intention to amalgamate the 2 dining areas into one larger unit to enable staff to provide assistance as and when needed. The manager demonstrated that she is aware that mealtimes are an important part of the day and can determine to some degree the quality of care provided. However it is essential that meals be provided in a way that is timely and demonstrates respect and dignity to people who because of their disability have to rely on staff to help them eat. Eccleston Court DS0000070882.V357745.R01.S.doc Version 5.2 Page 17 Complaints and Protection The intended outcomes for Standards 16 - 18 are: 16. 17. 18. Service users and their relatives and friends are confident that their complaints will be listened to, taken seriously and acted upon. Service users’ legal rights are protected. Service users are protected from abuse. The Commission considers Standards 16 and 18 the key standards to be. JUDGEMENT – we looked at outcomes for the following standard(s): 16.18.Quality in this outcome area is good. This judgement has been made using available evidence including a visit to this service. The systems in place for the protection of residents form harm and abuse are robust. EVIDENCE: The pre inspection questionnaire indicated the home has not received any complaints and no concerns have been expressed to CSCI. A complaints procedure is in place and is provided to all the people accommodated in the home when they first arrive. Discussions with people living in the home and their family and friends revealed that they were fully aware of their right to complain and in general knew the process. However all people spoken with said they had never made an official complaint as the home services were fine. They said that staff of the home constantly asked if everything was all right and they were able to say if and when they had any concerns. All staff are trained on protecting vulnerable adults from abuse. Discussions with staff demonstrated they had a good understanding of the differing tyres of abuse that can occur and actions that can be taken as a consequence. Staff said they had received their training in Adult Protection whilst employed by Arena Housing who had recently relinquished their ownership of Eccleston Court. However most of the staff had transferred over to CIC and training Eccleston Court DS0000070882.V357745.R01.S.doc Version 5.2 Page 18 records evidenced that all training including Protection of Vulnerable Adults (POVA) was in date. The manager advised that because a new company, CIC, had taken over the running of the home staff training had not yet been cascaded to the staff. However she was aware what staff needed updates and had ensured a training programme was in place to meet all needs. Eccleston Court DS0000070882.V357745.R01.S.doc Version 5.2 Page 19 Environment The intended outcomes for Standards 19 – 26 are: 19. 20. 21. 22. 23. 24. 25. 26. Service users live in a safe, well-maintained environment. Service users have access to safe and comfortable indoor and outdoor communal facilities. Service users have sufficient and suitable lavatories and washing facilities. Service users have the specialist equipment they require to maximise their independence. Service users’ own rooms suit their needs. Service users live in safe, comfortable bedrooms with their own possessions around them. Service users live in safe, comfortable surroundings. The home is clean, pleasant and hygienic. The Commission considers Standards 19 and 26 the key standards to be inspected. JUDGEMENT – we looked at outcomes for the following standard(s): 19.26.Quality in this outcome area is good. This judgement has been made using available evidence including a visit to this service. The standard’s of décor and cleanliness in the home ensures a homely environment. EVIDENCE: The overall standards in the home are good and the atmosphere is one of calm and comfort. The home does not present as being institutional in appearance and its design features include alarmed exit doors, single level flooring with external access, grab rails and adaptations in all communal areas, bathrooms and toilets. All rooms have nurse call systems, adapted bathing equipment and low level seating. Eccleston Court DS0000070882.V357745.R01.S.doc Version 5.2 Page 20 The manager advised that there is a programme of refurbishment in the home and it is her intention to change the dining areas to ensure that the comfort of the residents and the availability of staff is maximised. Bedrooms. All bedrooms viewed were comfortably furnished and included en –suite facilities. Bathrooms and Toilets. There are sufficient bathing facilities for all residents and the manager advised that she is in the process of redesigning some bathing areas to include enlarging one bathroom and providing a walk in shower. Laundry. The laundry was well organised and clean and tidy on the day of the unannounced visit. Staff advised that sufficient laundry facilities are in place along with systems to prevent the spread of infection. The manager revealed that the laundry is always maintained to this high standard and laundry staff work extremely hard to keep it this way. Eccleston Court DS0000070882.V357745.R01.S.doc Version 5.2 Page 21 Staffing The intended outcomes for Standards 27 – 30 are: 27. 28. 29. 30. Service users’ needs are met by the numbers and skill mix of staff. Service users are in safe hands at all times. Service users are supported and protected by the home’s recruitment policy and practices. Staff are trained and competent to do their jobs. The Commission consider all the above are key standards to be inspected. JUDGEMENT – we looked at outcomes for the following standard(s): 27.28.29.30.Quality in this outcome area is good This judgement has been made using available evidence including a visit to this service. The recruitment and selection process ensures staff are competent to meet the needs of the people living in the home. EVIDENCE: Staff spoken with said they had completed a range of training within the past twelve months and that further training had been planned as an ongoing process now that CIC had taken over the home. The manager said that CIC had organised a training programme for all staff to ensure they were “trained” in the CIC processes and also received updated training as and when it was needed. This training included the use of Elearning. The manager demonstrated full awareness of the need to provide staff training to concentrate on resident’s specific care needs and to ensure all staff was fully competent in their role. She confirmed that issues of equality and diversity would be included in staff training again to ensure that staff, have information and guidance on how to address this issue. Staff advised that they had revised contracts of employment and had fulfilled the requirements of the company in respect of references and police checks to make sure they were suitable to work with vulnerable adults. Eccleston Court DS0000070882.V357745.R01.S.doc Version 5.2 Page 22 Staff spoken with demonstrated they were trained and supported to carry out their work in the best interests of the people living in the home. They said initially they had been a little anxious that they were being taken over by a new company but now they felt that the transfer of ownership has gone very smoothly. However a number of residents commented that staffing levels had decreased since CIC had taken over the running of the home and staff confirmed this to be true. Whilst residents were high in their praise for the staff and how hard they worked some comments indicated that residents had to wait a while for assistance to go to the toilet and staff just did not have the time to stop and chat anymore. Discussions with the manager revealed that staffing levels had decreased but this should not affect the care and support provided to the people living in the home. At the time of the visit 5 care staff, 2 activity co-ordinators, 1 qualified nurse, the manager and her deputy were on duty together with a chef, kitchen assistants, domestic and laundry staff. Staff, appeared to be very busy, but were coping well to ensure that residents were provided with care and support. Eccleston Court DS0000070882.V357745.R01.S.doc Version 5.2 Page 23 Management and Administration The intended outcomes for Standards 31 – 38 are: 31. 32. 33. 34. 35. 36. 37. 38. Service users live in a home which is run and managed by a person who is fit to be in charge, of good character and able to discharge his or her responsibilities fully. Service users benefit from the ethos, leadership and management approach of the home. The home is run in the best interests of service users. Service users are safeguarded by the accounting and financial procedures of the home. Service users’ financial interests are safeguarded. Staff are appropriately supervised. Service users’ rights and best interests are safeguarded by the home’s record keeping, policies and procedures. The health, safety and welfare of service users and staff are promoted and protected. The Commission considers Standards 31, 33, 35 and 38 the key standards to be inspected. JUDGEMENT – we looked at outcomes for the following standard(s): 31.33.35.38.Quality in this outcome area is good This judgement has been made using available evidence including a visit to this service. The home is managed to ensure residents comfort and welfare is maintained. EVIDENCE: The manager has recently been appointed to her role at Eccleston Court and is awaiting her registration with CSCI. However she has been employed as a registered manager in other care homes and has vast experience in home management and the care of older people. The deputy manager is also qualified in management and has knowledge and experience of nursing care. There are clear lines of accountability within the home and staff say they feel supported in their roles. Eccleston Court DS0000070882.V357745.R01.S.doc Version 5.2 Page 24 The pre inspection questionnaire and discussion with the manager revealed that a range of policies and procedures relating to the care practices, recording of information and the running of the home have been reviewed and updated in line with CIC protocols. Systems are in place to ensure the ongoing monitoring of the service. Staff are supervised and monitored in their role and administrative have been tailored to meet the requirements of CIC. Quality assurance visit’s, are carried out by external CIC managers, and the home use questionnaires and meetings as feed back forums. The company use a central administration unit to manage resident’s finances and the manager advised that any money saved by each resident for whom the company hold appointee ship is banked in a personal interest paying account. Records of daily moneys seen were clear and accurate. Resident’s health, safety and welfare are promoted in the home. Pre inspection information indicated that the equipment in the home such as the fire system, holist and electrical wiring is checked and serviced regularly. Staff said they have completed a range of health and safety training and advised that this would be updated by the new organisation this year. A health and safety checklist is in place to ensure everything is in good order. Eccleston Court DS0000070882.V357745.R01.S.doc Version 5.2 Page 25 SCORING OF OUTCOMES This page summarises the assessment of the extent to which the National Minimum Standards for Care Homes for Older People have been met and uses the following scale. The scale ranges from: 4 Standard Exceeded 2 Standard Almost Met (Commendable) (Minor Shortfalls) 3 Standard Met 1 Standard Not Met (No Shortfalls) (Major Shortfalls) “X” in the standard met box denotes standard not assessed on this occasion “N/A” in the standard met box denotes standard not applicable CHOICE OF HOME Standard No Score 1 2 3 4 5 6 ENVIRONMENT Standard No Score 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 X X 3 X X X HEALTH AND PERSONAL CARE Standard No Score 7 3 8 3 9 3 10 3 11 X DAILY LIFE AND SOCIAL ACTIVITIES Standard No Score 12 3 13 3 14 3 15 3 COMPLAINTS AND PROTECTION Standard No Score 16 3 17 X 18 3 3 X X X X X X 3 STAFFING Standard No Score 27 3 28 3 29 3 30 3 MANAGEMENT AND ADMINISTRATION Standard No 31 32 33 34 35 36 37 38 Score 3 X 3 X 3 X X 3 Eccleston Court DS0000070882.V357745.R01.S.doc Version 5.2 Page 26 Are there any outstanding requirements from the last inspection? NO STATUTORY REQUIREMENTS This section sets out the actions, which must be taken so that the registered person/s meets the Care Standards Act 2000, Care Homes Regulations 2001 and the National Minimum Standards. The Registered Provider(s) must comply with the given timescales. No. Standard Regulation Requirement Timescale for action RECOMMENDATIONS These recommendations relate to National Minimum Standards and are seen as good practice for the Registered Provider/s to consider carrying out. No. 1 2 Refer to Standard OP7 OP15 Good Practice Recommendations Care plans must include a signature of the person the plan involves or their representative to ensure that they have been included and agree with the plan compilation. Meal -time assistance must be provided in a timely way that demonstrates respect and dignity to people who, because of their disability, have to rely on the staff to help them eat. Staff must be supplied in sufficient numbers and skill mix to meet the assessed needs of all the people living in the home. 3 OP27 Eccleston Court DS0000070882.V357745.R01.S.doc Version 5.2 Page 27 Commission for Social Care Inspection Merseyside Area Office 2nd Floor South Wing Burlington House Crosby Road North Waterloo, Liverpool L22 OLG National Enquiry Line: Telephone: 0845 015 0120 or 0191 233 3323 Textphone: 0845 015 2255 or 0191 233 3588 Email: enquiries@csci.gsi.gov.uk Web: www.csci.org.uk © This report is copyright Commission for Social Care Inspection (CSCI) and may only be used in its entirety. Extracts may not be used or reproduced without the express permission of CSCI Eccleston Court DS0000070882.V357745.R01.S.doc Version 5.2 Page 28 - Please note that this information is included on www.bestcarehome.co.uk under license from the regulator. Re-publishing this information is in breach of the terms of use of that website. Discrete codes and changes have been inserted throughout the textual data shown on the site that will provide incontrovertable proof of copying in the event this information is re-published on other websites. The policy of www.bestcarehome.co.uk is to use all legal avenues to pursue such offenders, including recovery of costs. You have been warned!

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Eccleston Court 18/03/08

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