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Care Home: Ladymead Nursing and Residential Home

  • 7-9 Westwood Road Bolton Lancs BL1 4DL
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Ladymead Nursing and Residential Home is situated off a main road less than a mile from the centre of Bolton. It provides care for older people with personal, nursing and mental health care needs due to dementia. The home has a total of 27 places. Accommodation is on three floors with both shared and single rooms. On the ground floor there are two lounges and a small dining room. Limited on-street parking is available. Fees Range from £365.00 to £555.00 (information supplied in the home information pack). 6 0 Over 65 6 27

  • Latitude: 53.581001281738
    Longitude: -2.4519999027252
  • Manager: Mrs Lois Anne Carruthers
  • Price p/w: £460
  • UK
  • Total Capacity: 27
  • Type: Care home with nursing
  • Provider: Icon Healthcare (UK) Limited
  • Ownership: Private
  • Care Home ID: 18913
Residents Needs:
Old age, not falling within any other category, Dementia

Previous Inspections

This may not be the latest inspection for this service as we are having techinical problems updating from CQC - please check directly on the regulators website for the most recent report; bestcarehome hopes to be back to regular updates shortly.

For extracts, read the latest CQC inspection for Ladymead Nursing and Residential Home.

Key inspection report Care homes for older people Name: Address: Ladymead Nursing and Residential Home 7-9 Westwood Road Bolton Lancs BL1 4DL     The quality rating for this care home is:   two star good service A quality rating is our assessment of how well a care home is meeting the needs of the people who use it. We give a quality rating following a full review of the service. We call this full review a ‘key’ inspection. Lead inspector: Rukhsana Yates     Date: 1 4 0 4 2 0 0 9 This is a review of quality of outcomes that people experience in this care home. We believe high quality care should • • • • • Be safe Have the right outcomes, including clinical outcomes Be a good experience for the people that use it Help prevent illness, and promote healthy, independent living Be available to those who need it when they need it. The first part of the review gives the overall quality rating for the care home: • • • • 3 2 1 0 stars - excellent stars - good star - adequate star - poor There is also a bar chart that gives a quick way of seeing the quality of care that the home provides under key areas that matter to people. There is a summary of what we think this service does well, what they have improved on and, where it applies, what they need to do better. We use the national minimum standards to describe the outcomes that people should experience. National minimum standards are written by the Department of Health for each type of care service. After the summary there is more detail about our findings. The following table explains what you will see under each outcome area. Outcome area (for example Choice of home) These are the outcomes that people staying in care homes should experience. that people have said are important to them: They reflect the things This box tells you the outcomes that we will always inspect against when we do a key inspection. This box tells you any additional outcomes that we may inspect against when we do a key inspection. This is what people staying in this care home experience: Judgement: This box tells you our opinion of what we have looked at in this outcome area. We will say whether it is excellent, good, adequate or poor. Evidence: This box describes the information we used to come to our judgement. Care Homes for Older People Page 2 of 23 We review the quality of the service against outcomes from the National Minimum Standards (NMS). Those standards are written by the Department of Health for each type of care service. Copies of the National Minimum Standards – Care Homes for Older People can be found at www.dh.gov.uk or bought from The Stationery Office (TSO) PO Box 29, St Crispins, Duke Street, Norwich, NR3 1GN. Tel: 0870 600 5522. Online ordering from the Stationery Office is also available: www.tso.co.uk/bookshop The mission of the Care Quality Commission is to make care better for people by: • Regulating health and adult social care services to ensure quality and safety standards, drive improvement and stamp out bad practice • Protecting the rights of people who use services, particularly the most vulnerable and those detained under the Mental Health Act 1983 • Providing accessible, trustworthy information on the quality of care and services so people can make better decisions about their care and so that commissioners and providers of services can improve services. • Providing independent public accountability on how commissioners and providers of services are improving the quality of care and providing value for money. Reader Information Document Purpose Author Audience Further copies from Copyright Inspection report Care Quality Commission General public 0870 240 7535 (telephone order line) Copyright © (2009) Care Quality Commission (CQC). This publication may be reproduced in whole or in part, free of charge, in any format or medium provided that it is not used for commercial gain. This consent is subject to the material being reproduced accurately and on proviso that it is not used in a derogatory manner or misleading context. The material should be acknowledged as CQC copyright, with the title and date of publication of the document specified. www.cqc.org.uk Internet address Care Homes for Older People Page 3 of 23 Information about the care home Name of care home: Address: Ladymead Nursing and Residential Home 7-9 Westwood Road Bolton Lancs BL1 4DL Telephone number: Fax number: Email address: Provider web address: Name of registered provider(s): Name of registered manager (if applicable) Icon Healthcare (UK) Limited Type of registration: Number of places registered: care home 27 Conditions of registration: Category(ies) : Number of places (if applicable): Under 65 dementia old age, not falling within any other category Additional conditions: Date of last inspection Brief description of the care home Ladymead Nursing and Residential Home is situated off a main road less than a mile from the centre of Bolton. It provides care for older people with personal, nursing and mental health care needs due to dementia. The home has a total of 27 places. Accommodation is on three floors with both shared and single rooms. On the ground floor there are two lounges and a small dining room. Limited on-street parking is available. Fees Range from £365.00 to £555.00 (information supplied in the home information pack). 6 0 Over 65 6 27 Care Homes for Older People Page 4 of 23 Summary This is an overview of what we found during the inspection. The quality rating for this care home is: Our judgement for each outcome: two star good service Choice of home Health and personal care Daily life and social activities Complaints and protection Environment Staffing Management and administration peterchart Poor Adequate Good Excellent How we did our inspection: This inspection which included a site visit that the home did not know was going to take place was carried out over two days. The process of inspection included observing what went on in the home, talking to people living there, staff and the manager and owner of the home, looking round the home, and examining some important records. Before the inspection, we also asked the manager of the home to complete a form called an Annual Quality Assurance Assessment (AQAA) to tell us what they felt they did well, and what they needed to do better. This helps us to determine if the management of the home see the service they provide the same way that we see the service. We felt this form was completed adequately. Care Homes for Older People Page 5 of 23 What the care home does well: What has improved since the last inspection? What they could do better: If you want to know what action the person responsible for this care home is taking following this report, you can contact them using the details on page 4. The report of this inspection is available from our website www.cqc.org.uk. You can get printed copies from enquiries@cqc.org.uk or by telephoning our order line 0870 240 7535. Care Homes for Older People Page 6 of 23 Details of our findings Contents Choice of home (standards 1 - 6) Health and personal care (standards 7 - 11) Daily life and social activities (standards 12 - 15) Complaints and protection (standards 16 - 18) Environment (standards 19 - 26) Staffing (standards 27 - 30) Management and administration (standards 31 - 38) Outstanding statutory requirements Requirements and recommendations from this inspection Care Homes for Older People Page 7 of 23 Choice of home These are the outcomes that people staying in care homes should experience. They reflect the things that people have said are important to them: People are confident that the care home can support them. This is because there is an accurate assessment of their needs that they, or people close to them, have been involved in. This tells the home all about them and the support they need. People who stay at the home only for intermediate care, have a clear assessment that includes a plan on what they hope for and want to achieve when they return home. People can decide whether the care home can meet their support and accommodation needs. This is because they, or people close to them, have been able to visit the home and have got full, clear, accurate and up to date information about the home. If they decide to stay in the home they know about their rights and responsibilities because there is an easy to understand contract or statement of terms and conditions between them and the care home that includes how much they will pay and what the home provides for the money. This is what people staying in this care home experience: Judgement: People using this service experience good quality outcomes in this area. We have made this judgement using a range of evidence, including a visit to this service. People are assured that they will have their needs assessed before moving in to the home. People would benefit from having full information about the service in a suitable format to help them make an informed choice about moving to the home. Evidence: There is an information pack provided to current and prospective residents. This contains information about the service, aims and objectives, philosophy of care and the complaints procedure. The pack needs to be updated to include information about the qualifications and experience of the staff and the provider, and the views of people living at the home. As many people living at the home have dementia, the information should be made available in different formats so that it is easier to understand. These additions will ensure that people have accessible information about the service. The pre-admission assessment records of two people admitted since the last inspection were looked at. Before residents are admitted to the home an assessment Care Homes for Older People Page 8 of 23 Evidence: of their needs is carried out in consultation with the person, their relatives and relevant health and social care professionals such as doctors and social workers. The assessment helps the prospective resident (and their relatives) to decide how appropriate a placement at the home would be and enable the nurse conducting the assessment to determine if the home will be able to meet the prospective residents needs appropriately. The initial assessment helps to form the basis of the plan of care to be followed following admission to the home. One of the people admitted was spoken to and described the home as having a nice atmosphere, and good staff. The care records inspected contained detailed pre and post admission assessments. Care Homes for Older People Page 9 of 23 Health and personal care These are the outcomes that people staying in care homes should experience. They reflect the things that people have said are important to them: People’s health, personal and social care needs are met. The home has a plan of care that the person, or someone close to them, has been involved in making. If they take medicine, they manage it themselves if they can. If they cannot manage their medicine, the care home supports them with it, in a safe way. People’s right to privacy is respected and the support they get from staff is given in a way that maintains their dignity. If people are approaching the end of their life, the care home will respect their choices and help them feel comfortable and secure. They, and people close to them, are reassured that their death will be handled with sensitivity, dignity and respect, and take account of their spiritual and cultural wishes. This is what people staying in this care home experience: Judgement: People using this service experience good quality outcomes in this area. We have made this judgement using a range of evidence, including a visit to this service. People have their personal care and health care needs met, and feel that they are treated with dignity and respect. Evidence: The care records of three people were inspected. These contained care plans that were initially based on the pre-admission assessment that is referred to earlier in this report. Care plans addressed the health and personal care needs of people at the home in a clear, organised way and were evaluated at least monthly. Risk assessments, that seek to protect peoples health and welfare supplemented the care plans in respect of skin integrity (assessing the risk of pressure sores), mobility/moving and handling, nutrition, (including regular weight monitoring) and other areas of potential risk for individual residents were also assessed at least monthly (for example the need for bed rails to be used). Daily statements regarding individuals progress were also recorded and these were timed and signed by staff. It was evident that people are enabled to access the services of dieticians, opticians, chiropodists, dentists, district nurses and other specialist services as needed. Family members were kept informed of all changes in their relations health through reviews Care Homes for Older People Page 10 of 23 Evidence: or informal discussions. The practices for the receipt, recording, storage, handling, administration and disposal of residents medicines were appropriate and safe. The nursing staff were responsible for the management of individuals medicines. Medicine records had been completed properly. Discussion with people living at the home, and observations during the visit confirmed that people were treated with respect and that their right to privacy was upheld. Comments made included; They treat you well, they are very good, Theres a nice homely atmosphere. On the day of inspection staff were seen to care for people in a natural and friendly manner, and to show them respect, protect their dignity and assist them properly throughout the day. Care Homes for Older People Page 11 of 23 Daily life and social activities These are the outcomes that people staying in care homes should experience. They reflect the things that people have said are important to them: Each person is treated as an individual and the care home is responsive to his or her race, culture, religion, age, disability, gender and sexual orientation. They are part of their local community. The care home supports people to follow personal interests and activities. People are able to keep in touch with family, friends and representatives. They are as independent as they can be, lead their chosen lifestyle and have the opportunity to make the most of their abilities. People have nutritious and attractive meals and snacks, at a time and place to suit them. There are no additional outcomes. This is what people staying in this care home experience: Judgement: People using this service experience good quality outcomes in this area. We have made this judgement using a range of evidence, including a visit to this service. People benefit from choices to enable them to exercise day to day control over their lives, receive visitors, and enjoy the food of their choice. Peoples individual social needs are not always identified. Evidence: Discussion with people living at the home, and observations made on the day of inspection visit, indicate that the routines of daily life in the home are generally as flexible as possible in a communal setting. People were enabled to choose what time they get up and go to bed, and staff inform and consult them, as far as possible, about the care and support they need, enabling people to retain as much control over their life as possible. In terms of social and leisure provision, people were seen to enjoy exercise activities, and they confirmed that staff try to make time to sit and chat, or join them in a singalong. One person said she enjoyed colouring pictures, and was enabled and encouraged to do this. However, some feedback suggested that 4 care staff instead of 3 in the afternoons would help to ensure individual social care needs were identified, met and reviewed, particularly for people with dementia. Care Homes for Older People Page 12 of 23 Evidence: Residents wishing to maintain their religious links are enabled to do so, with regular services and communion taking place in the home. The home has an open visiting policy. There are no unreasonable restrictions on the time people visit. The only time restrictions would be imposed is when requested by the person living at the home. People said their relatives are always made welcome home and were able to see their relatives in the privacy of their own rooms. They confirmed a choice of where to spend their time. While some people chose to sit in the lounge a number were observed to spend their time in their own rooms. Meals are cooked on site in the homes kitchen. Menus are varied, balanced and provided choice. Meals are served in a designated dining area which provides quite limited space, the lounge areas or the persons own room. Lunch was observed on the day of inspection. This was a hot and substantial meal and staff assisted and served residents their meals appropriately. Special diets were catered for, and the cook clearly had a good knowledge of individual likes and dislikes. Each person consulted was happy with the food, with a typical comment being The food is always good. They know what I like, I have no complaints. Care Homes for Older People Page 13 of 23 Complaints and protection These are the outcomes that people staying in care homes should experience. They reflect the things that people have said are important to them: If people have concerns with their care, they or people close to them know how to complain. Any concern is looked into and action taken to put things right. The care home safeguards people from abuse and neglect and takes action to follow up any allegations. People’s legal rights are protected, including being able to vote in elections. This is what people staying in this care home experience: Judgement: People using this service experience good quality outcomes in this area. We have made this judgement using a range of evidence, including a visit to this service. People are confident that issues they raise are listened to and taken seriously, and feel safely supported by considerate staff. Evidence: The service has a complaints procedure that is displayed in the home and included in the information pack. People spoken to on the day of inspection said they have confidence in the owner to listen to them, to take their complaints seriously and that issues brought to his or the acting managers attention are responded to. Recent issues related to environmental improvements needed, and their was evidence that these were being addressed. Policies and practices aimed at protecting residents from abuse are in place, and Boltons inter-agency safeguarding procedure is held on site. Staff spoken to were able to show that they understood the procedures, and the circumstances in whcih they should report observations of poor practice. Training records showed that several staff were due for refresher training in this area, and that this had been identified as a priority in the training plan. In the meantime, the manager was covering the topic in individual staff supervision meetings. People living at the home said they felt comfortable and safe, describing the staff as very kind, patient, and friendly and caring. Care Homes for Older People Page 14 of 23 Environment These are the outcomes that people staying in care homes should experience. They reflect the things that people have said are important to them: People stay in a safe and well-maintained home that is homely, clean, pleasant and hygienic. People stay in a home that has enough space and facilities for them to lead the life they choose and to meet their needs. The home makes sure they have the right specialist equipment that encourages and promotes their independence. Their room feels like their own, it is comfortable and they feel safe when they use it. This is what people staying in this care home experience: Judgement: People using this service experience adequate quality outcomes in this area. We have made this judgement using a range of evidence, including a visit to this service. People live in a comfortable and clean environment that is being gradually improved in order to better meet their bathing and showering needs. Evidence: A tour of the premises revealed that the home was clean and free of adverse odours, and people spoken with confirmed that the home is regularly cleaned to a good standard. The home appeared to provide a safe and well-maintained environment for residents, with no hazards observed. The lounges and dining area were adequately furnished, decorated, heated, ventilated and lit. The laundry area is sited so as to not intrude on areas used by peopple living at the home, and was adequately equipped. Since assuming ownership of the home, the provider has carried out a full audit of the premises, and has identified and prioritised required improvements to the environment. These include a kitchen refurbishment, improvements to the heating, hot water and bathing / showering facilities, and replacement of some equipment. This programme of renewal and maintenance is under continuous review. There is a need to prioritise the provision of a bath chair that better supports people safely, as at least one person with poor balance was only able to have bed baths as a result of this shortfall. Care Homes for Older People Page 15 of 23 Staffing These are the outcomes that people staying in care homes should experience. They reflect the things that people have said are important to them: People have safe and appropriate support as there are enough competent staff on duty at all times. They have confidence in the staff at the home because checks have been done to make sure that they are suitable to care for them. Their needs are met and they are cared for by staff who get the relevant training and support from their managers. There are no additional outcomes. This is what people staying in this care home experience: Judgement: People using this service experience good quality outcomes in this area. We have made this judgement using a range of evidence, including a visit to this service. People who live at the home are supported by an experienced, stable staff team that they trust. Evidence: Staffing records indicated that a qualified nurse was on duty at all times and that, in addition to care staff, the home employs cooks, kitchen assistants and a maintenance worker to ensure that people have their needs met appropriately. Inspection of staffing records, discussion with people living at the home, the acting manager and staff revealed that care and support needs were being met. The manager monitors dependency levels to ensure night and day staff provision is suitable. The home continues to make good progress in the provision of NVQ 2 and 3 training. At the time of inspection, almost 50 of the care staff had achieved the qualification, withothers working towards it. 2 staff recruitment files were inspected at the last inspection, with no new staff employed under the current ownership. They contained evidence of CRB checks (including POVA first checks), 2 written references, criminal convictions declarations, proof of identity, (including a photograph) and completed application forms. Discussion with staff indicated that they were provided with induction training on commencing employment. There was also evidence that staff had been provided Care Homes for Older People Page 16 of 23 Evidence: training in moving and handling, fire safety and basic food hygiene and other topics. Care Homes for Older People Page 17 of 23 Management and administration These are the outcomes that people staying in care homes should experience. They reflect the things that people have said are important to them: People have confidence in the care home because it is led and managed appropriately. People control their own money and choose how they spend it. If they or someone close to them cannot manage their money, it is managed by the care home in their best interests. The environment is safe for people and staff because appropriate health and safety practices are carried out. People get the right support from the care home because the manager runs it appropriately with an open approach that makes them feel valued and respected. The people staying at the home are safeguarded because it follows clear financial and accounting procedures, keeps records appropriately and ensures their staff understand the way things should be done. They get the right care because the staff are supervised and supported by their managers. This is what people staying in this care home experience: Judgement: People using this service experience good quality outcomes in this area. We have made this judgement using a range of evidence, including a visit to this service. People are confident that the way the home is managed promotes their best interests and shows a commitment to further improving the service. Evidence: Ownership of the home passed to the current proprietor in December 2008. The day to day management of care was being undertaken by a highly experioenced acting manager and qualified nurse who has worked at the home for a number of years, with recruitment of a permanent manager underway. People living at the home and staff spoken to on the day of inspection said that the manager is accessible and supportive. They appreciated her knowledge and confirmed that she met regularly with them as a team and individually to discuss care practices and improvements. A quality assurance system has been developed to measure satisfaction with the level of care and accommodation provided. This is essential as such information will enable a quality improvement plan to be fully developed and implemented to further improve the quality of life for residents. Records showed that a range of standards are audited Care Homes for Older People Page 18 of 23 Evidence: regularly, with the most recent audit identifying the need for a new training programme and environmental improvements. The registered person showed a good awareness of the priorities to be addressed at the home, and plans were in place to address these, particularly in terms of improving bathing and showering facilities. The arrangements for the management of personal allowance monies, where these are managed by the home, were secure and appropriately documented. The health, safety and welfare of people living at the home and staff is promoted and protected. For example staff are provided with training and appropriate equipment to ensure moving and handling needs are met. An example of this would be for a person who needs to be safely moved with the aid of a hoist. An environmental assessment for each person at the home had been conducted to ensure that any issues relating to how the size of bedrooms that may impinge on how care is delivered has been addressed. Fire safety training is provided to staff with updates planned. Information provided by the home indicates that electrical, gas and other equipment safety inspections and servicing have been carried out. Care Homes for Older People Page 19 of 23 Are there any outstanding requirements from the last inspection? Yes £ No R Outstanding statutory requirements These are requirements that were set at the previous inspection, but have still not been met. They say what the registered person had to do to meet the Care Standards Act 2000, Care Homes Regulations 2001 and the National Minimum Standards. No. Standard Regulation Requirement Timescale for action Care Homes for Older People Page 20 of 23 Requirements and recommendations from this inspection: Immediate requirements: These are immediate requirements that were set on the day we visited this care home. The registered person had to meet these within 48 hours. No. Standard Regulation Requirement Timescale for action 1 1 5 The service user guide must 03/07/2009 be updated with information about staff experience and qualifications, and be made available in different formats. This will ensure people have accessible information about the service so that they can make an informed choice about moving in. 2 12 16 Individual social care needs must be identified and activities arranged to meet them. This will ensure that people have access to activites suitable to their abilities, needs and wishes. 26/06/2009 3 19 23 The renewal programme 19/06/2009 must include the provision of a safe and suitable bath chair. This will ensure that each person is able to have a bath because the facilities are safe to do so. Statutory requirements These requirements set out what the registered person must do to meet the Care Standards Act 2000, Care Homes Regulations 2001 and the National Minimum Standards. The registered person(s) must do this within the timescales we have set. No. Standard Regulation Requirement Timescale for action Care Homes for Older People Page 21 of 23 Recommendations These recommendations are taken from the best practice described in the National Minimum Standards and the registered person(s) should consider them as a way of improving their service. No Refer to Standard Good Practice Recommendations Care Homes for Older People Page 22 of 23 Helpline: Telephone: 03000 616161 Email: enquiries@cqc.org.uk Web: www.cqc.org.uk We want people to be able to access this information. If you would like a summary in a different format or language please contact our helpline or go to our website. Copyright © (2009) Care Quality Commission (CQC). This publication may be reproduced in whole or in part, free of charge, in any format or medium provided that it is not used for commercial gain. This consent is subject to the material being reproduced accurately and on proviso that it is not used in a derogatory manner or misleading context. The material should be acknowledged as CQC copyright, with the title and date of publication of the document specified. Care Homes for Older People Page 23 of 23 - Please note that this information is included on www.bestcarehome.co.uk under license from the regulator. Re-publishing this information is in breach of the terms of use of that website. Discrete codes and changes have been inserted throughout the textual data shown on the site that will provide incontrovertable proof of copying in the event this information is re-published on other websites. The policy of www.bestcarehome.co.uk is to use all legal avenues to pursue such offenders, including recovery of costs. You have been warned!

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Ladymead Nursing and Residential... 09/04/09

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