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Care Home: Lilburn Lodge and Riverview Care Centre

  • Lilburn Place Southwick Sunderland SR5 2AF
  • Tel: 01915496331
  • Fax: 01915480395
  • Planned feature Advertise here! POOR

Lilburn and Riverview Care Centre is a registered care home with nursing, situated near Sunderland s Queen Alexandra Bridge and close to the shopping centre of Southwick. The area is well served by public transport. Until recently it was two separate services known as Lilburn Lodge and Riverview Lodge and both shared the same grounds and were run by the same provider. The services have now been amalgamated into one and it is now registered with CQC as Lilburn and Riverview Care Centre with one registered manager. The home provides permanent accommodation with personal care and support for up to a total of 68 older people, some of who may have dementia care and nursing care needs. Within this total, the home may also provide a service to a limited number of older people with a physical disability. Throughout the two buildings the accommodation is laid out over three floors of the purpose built property, served by a passenger lift. Each floor has a lounge, bathing areas, WCs and single en-suite bedrooms. Open plan kitchen/dining areas are situated on the first and second floors and there is an enclosed lawned area to the rear and car parking on site. The home publishes a regularly updated service user guide that is available in a range of accessible formats and this is available to service users and visitors along with a range of information leaflets including a monthly newsletter in the home`s reception area. .

  • Latitude: 54.917999267578
    Longitude: -1.402999997139
  • Manager: Manager post vacant
  • Price p/w: ~
  • UK
  • Total Capacity: 68
  • Type: Care home with nursing
  • Provider: Southern Cross Healthcare (Focus) Limited
  • Ownership: Private
  • Care Home ID: 9694
Residents Needs:
Dementia, Old age, not falling within any other category

Latest Inspection

This is the latest available inspection report for this service, carried out on 21st September 2010. CQC found this care home to be providing an Poor service.

The inspector found there to be outstanding requirements from the previous inspection report but made no statutory requirements on the home.

For extracts, read the latest CQC inspection for Lilburn Lodge and Riverview Care Centre.

What the care home does well There is good information about the service and other agencies that they work with in the entrance hallways of the home. This allows interested persons to gain more understanding of the service delivered and assist them to make a choice about using the service. Staff work hard and are focussed in their approach. They have good knowledge of the people they support and treat them with respect, some have worked at the home for many years. This means that service users feel confident in the people that support them. Assessments had been updated to identify people`s needs and risks according to individual vulnerability. Most of the service users` care plans have been reviewed and updated and now reflect service users` current health and welfare needs and where applicable incorporate advice from health professionals. The plans now provide more consistent and specific details about meeting needs including moving and handling, risk of falls, nutrition and special diets, wound management and continence. This means that staff are clearly informed of the needs of service users and service users receive the appropriate sort of care and support. There is a planned training programme in place for staff, so that the skills that they have are updated and new knowledge is found. This means that service users are supported by competent staff who know their job well. The training programme includes training in relation to the local authority`s safeguarding procedures. This means that all staff will know more about the procedures to follow if they need to report any instances of abuse. The home has a copy of these procedures in the office so that staff can refer to them. Staff have recently received moving and handling training so they now have the skills and knowledge to support service users to transfer safely and with competence. It is now clearly recorded in the care plans what specific hoist and sling are needed for individuals who need assistance and clear information guide the identified number of staff needed, to safely transfer the person reflecting good practice and current legislation. Two activity coordinators are employed by the home who show their enthusiasm about planning and implementing activity. Service users are engaged in both 1:1 and group activities both in the home and the local community. This means that service users do not become bored and can make choices about what they do during the day. What the care home could do better: It is important that the care plans that have not yet been reviewed and updated are addressed and completed as planned by the end of September, so that staff are guided to support all service users in an appropriate and effective way. The organisation has a dementia risk assessment tool in place, however this is not currently used in this home. By using this specific assessment and monitoring tool, the mental health needs of people with dementia can be identified and monitored. This will help the service to identify what stage of dementia a person is at, so that their psychological and emotional needs can be ongoingly appropriately addressed. Records of personal hygiene were not always fully completed therefore it was not always clear from the records what assistance had been given to the individual that day. So that it is clear, such records should be consistently completed to show all assistance provided. Facilities within the home must be provided and maintained for the exclusive storage of medicines and related items. The locks on the medication cupboards must be made secure and the practice of leaving medication in an insecure place must stop. This will ensure that service users` medication is stored safely and appropriately. The rooms on both units also need to be kept clean. As many parts of the home still need to be refurbished, a programme of maintenance and renewal of the fabric and decoration must be developed and put in place. This is to ensure the health and well being of people living and working in the home. The home has not been managed by a permanent manager for some time now and staff morale is low. Staff feel that they would benefit from someone leading them in a consistent way. So that service users receive a service that is consistently managed in their best interests and so that staff can rely on consistent leadership, the provider must provide a competent manager. Random inspection report Care homes for older people Name: Address: Lilburn Lodge and Riverview Care Centre Lilburn Place Southwick Sunderland SR5 2AF zero star poor service 25/06/2010 The quality rating for this care home is: The rating was made on: A quality rating is our assessment of how well a care home, agency or scheme is meeting the needs of the people who use it. We give a quality rating following a full review of the service. We call this review a ‘key’ inspection. This is a report of a random inspection of this care home. A random inspection is a short, focussed review of the service. Details of how to get other inspection reports for this care home, including the last key inspection report, can be found on the last page of this report. Lead inspector: Elsie Allnutt Date: 2 1 0 9 2 0 1 0 Information about the care home Name of care home: Address: Lilburn Lodge and Riverview Care Centre Lilburn Place Southwick Sunderland SR5 2AF 01915496331 01915480395 lilburnlodge@schealthcare.co.uk Telephone number: Fax number: Email address: Provider web address: Name of registered provider(s): Name of registered manager (if applicable) Southern Cross Healthcare (Focus) Limited Type of registration: Number of places registered: Conditions of registration: Category(ies) : care home 68 Number of places (if applicable): Under 65 Over 65 0 40 dementia old age, not falling within any other category Conditions of registration: 46 0 The maximum number of users who can be accommodated is 68 The registered person may provide the following category of service only Care Home with nursing - Code N To service users of the following gender: Either Whose primary care needs on admission to the home are within the following categories: Old age not falling within any other category - Code OP, maximum number of places, 40 Dementia - Code DE, maximum number of places 46 Date of last inspection 2 5 0 6 2 0 1 0 Care Homes for Older People Page 2 of 12 Brief description of the care home Lilburn and Riverview Care Centre is a registered care home with nursing, situated near Sunderland s Queen Alexandra Bridge and close to the shopping centre of Southwick. The area is well served by public transport. Until recently it was two separate services known as Lilburn Lodge and Riverview Lodge and both shared the same grounds and were run by the same provider. The services have now been amalgamated into one and it is now registered with CQC as Lilburn and Riverview Care Centre with one registered manager. The home provides permanent accommodation with personal care and support for up to a total of 68 older people, some of who may have dementia care and nursing care needs. Within this total, the home may also provide a service to a limited number of older people with a physical disability. Throughout the two buildings the accommodation is laid out over three floors of the purpose built property, served by a passenger lift. Each floor has a lounge, bathing areas, WCs and single en-suite bedrooms. Open plan kitchen/dining areas are situated on the first and second floors and there is an enclosed lawned area to the rear and car parking on site. The home publishes a regularly updated service user guide that is available in a range of accessible formats and this is available to service users and visitors along with a range of information leaflets including a monthly newsletter in the homes reception area. . Care Homes for Older People Page 3 of 12 What we found: This inspection was carried out to check compliance with requirements made at a Key Inspection carried out by the Care Quality Commission on the 25th June 2010. The concerns raised and the requirements made related to; the standards of assessment and care planning, health and safety, risks and care provision to people living at the home, medication storage, staff training and the condition of the building. This inspection took place over one day and involved two compliance inspectors visiting the home on 21 September 2010 and a pharmacist inspector visiting the home on 22nd September 2010. Time was spent examining relevant records, talking to people living at the home, management and staff, observing care provision, looking around the home and checking medication arrangements. We found that: Most of the care records for people living at the home have been audited and brought up to date and it was planned and expected this process would be completed within the coming weeks. Records now contain more information about peoples social history and interests, preferences in daily living and communication needs. Assessments have been updated to identify peoples needs and risks according to individual vulnerability. However there is no assessment tool in use specific to assessing and monitoring the mental health needs of people with dementia. People living at the home have recorded care plans that reflect their current health and welfare needs and where applicable incorporate advice from health professionals. The plans provide more consistent and specific details about meeting needs including moving and handling, risk of falls, nutrition and special diets, wound management and continence. There is evidence within care plans of sensitively recorded information and promoting choice, independence and dignity. The care plans are now evaluated at least monthly and revised when peoples needs change. The extent of supplementary care records/charts is to be reviewed to make sure these are relevant to peoples identified needs. There were some gaps in chart recordings that show assistance provided by staff to meet personal hygiene needs. There has been no significant improvement in medicines storage in the home since the key inspection last June. Treatment rooms on both units are used as office areas as well as for the storage of medicines. Some medication awaiting collection for disposal was stored in an unlocked box on the floor of the Lilburn unit and two cupboards containing medicines had faulty locks and were not secure. Because these rooms are not locked and access is not restricted, security of medicines is not maintained. The Riverside unit room particularly was dirty, cluttered with a trolley, pairs of glasses, and generally untidy. Neither room provides the appropriate environment to manage medicines securely and safely. Medicines are not stored at the correct room temperature on the Riverside unit and refrigerated medicines are not stored within an acceptable temperature range on the Lilburn unit. Temperatures are regularly measured and recorded but no action has been Care Homes for Older People Page 4 of 12 taken to address medicines not stored correctly. The storage of controlled drugs was satisfactory. Staff on duty were aware of the high temperatures and faulty locks and told the pharmacist they had reported the matter, but there was no evidence of any management action to address these issues. A discussion took place with the area manager following the inspection who confirmed these issues would be addressed immediately. Good staffing levels are provided and staff were observed to be attentive and engaged with people living at the home. They were respectful, supported people to make choices and were considerate of individuals wishes. There are two enthusiastic activities coordinators who organise and provide a variety of group and one-to-one social activities, events and outings. A staff training plan is in place that includes courses on caring for people with dementia, challenging behaviour, the Mental Capacity Act and Deprivation of Liberty, and safeguarding vulnerable adults. Whilst there have been some redecoration in the home, a planned programme of maintenance and renewal within the building with timescales still needs to be introduced. Senior management within the company are supporting the running of the home and efforts are being made to appoint a permanent manager to provide greater stability and leadership within the service. Overall we found that compliance with the majority of requirements have been achieved to improve outcomes for the people living at the home. The requirements that remain as part of this report are those that have not been fully met. Development plans have been requested from the provider to demonstrate how they will be met within the timescales set. What the care home does well: There is good information about the service and other agencies that they work with in the entrance hallways of the home. This allows interested persons to gain more understanding of the service delivered and assist them to make a choice about using the service. Staff work hard and are focussed in their approach. They have good knowledge of the people they support and treat them with respect, some have worked at the home for many years. This means that service users feel confident in the people that support them. Assessments had been updated to identify peoples needs and risks according to individual vulnerability. Most of the service users care plans have been reviewed and updated and now reflect service users current health and welfare needs and where applicable incorporate advice from health professionals. The plans now provide more consistent and specific details about meeting needs including moving and handling, risk of falls, nutrition and special diets, wound management and continence. This means that Care Homes for Older People Page 5 of 12 staff are clearly informed of the needs of service users and service users receive the appropriate sort of care and support. There is a planned training programme in place for staff, so that the skills that they have are updated and new knowledge is found. This means that service users are supported by competent staff who know their job well. The training programme includes training in relation to the local authoritys safeguarding procedures. This means that all staff will know more about the procedures to follow if they need to report any instances of abuse. The home has a copy of these procedures in the office so that staff can refer to them. Staff have recently received moving and handling training so they now have the skills and knowledge to support service users to transfer safely and with competence. It is now clearly recorded in the care plans what specific hoist and sling are needed for individuals who need assistance and clear information guide the identified number of staff needed, to safely transfer the person reflecting good practice and current legislation. Two activity coordinators are employed by the home who show their enthusiasm about planning and implementing activity. Service users are engaged in both 1:1 and group activities both in the home and the local community. This means that service users do not become bored and can make choices about what they do during the day. What they could do better: It is important that the care plans that have not yet been reviewed and updated are addressed and completed as planned by the end of September, so that staff are guided to support all service users in an appropriate and effective way. The organisation has a dementia risk assessment tool in place, however this is not currently used in this home. By using this specific assessment and monitoring tool, the mental health needs of people with dementia can be identified and monitored. This will help the service to identify what stage of dementia a person is at, so that their psychological and emotional needs can be ongoingly appropriately addressed. Records of personal hygiene were not always fully completed therefore it was not always clear from the records what assistance had been given to the individual that day. So that it is clear, such records should be consistently completed to show all assistance provided. Facilities within the home must be provided and maintained for the exclusive storage of medicines and related items. The locks on the medication cupboards must be made secure and the practice of leaving medication in an insecure place must stop. This will ensure that service users medication is stored safely and appropriately. The rooms on both units also need to be kept clean. As many parts of the home still need to be refurbished, a programme of maintenance and renewal of the fabric and decoration must be developed and put in place. This is to ensure the health and well being of people living and working in the home. The home has not been managed by a permanent manager for some time now and staff morale is low. Staff feel that they would benefit from someone leading them in a Care Homes for Older People Page 6 of 12 consistent way. So that service users receive a service that is consistently managed in their best interests and so that staff can rely on consistent leadership, the provider must provide a competent manager. If you want to know what action the person responsible for this care home is taking following this report, you can contact them using the details set out on page 2. Care Homes for Older People Page 7 of 12 Are there any outstanding requirements from the last inspection? Yes R No £ Outstanding statutory requirements These are requirements that were set at the previous inspection, but have still not been met. They say what the registered person had to do to meet the Care Standards Act 2000, Regulations 2001 and the National Minimum Standards. No. Standard Regulation Requirement Timescale for action 1 9 13 The registered person must 30/07/2010 ensure that medicine storage facilities on both units are reviewed and up dated in line with best guidance practice. Medicines must be stored safely and securely at the correct temperature. This is to ensure the health and safety of people living at the home. 2 12 16 Assessments must include 30/09/2010 detailed information about the social aspects of a persons care to help ensure activities provided are meaningful and of interest to the person. This is to ensure the social and communication needs of the person are met. 3 18 13 The registered person must 30/09/2010 ensure that all grades of staff complete safeguarding training which links into the Local Authority procedural Framework. This is to ensure people living at the home are protected from abuse. Care Homes for Older People Page 8 of 12 Outstanding statutory requirements These are requirements that were set at the previous inspection, but have still not been met. They say what the registered person had to do to meet the Care Standards Act 2000, Regulations 2001 and the National Minimum Standards. No. Standard Regulation Requirement Timescale for action 4 19 23 The registered person must provide a programme of maintenance and renewal of the fabric and decoration of the building. This is to ensure the health and well being of people living in the home. 27/08/2010 5 24 13 The registered person must provide appropriate beds for service users who require nursing care and are at risk. This is to ensure the health and safety of people living in the home. 30/07/2010 6 26 23 The registered person must 30/07/2010 ensure that a cleaning programme is in place to maintain a hygienic environment and to eliminate odours. This is to ensure appropriate standards of hygiene are maintained. Care Homes for Older People Page 9 of 12 Requirements and recommendations from this inspection: Immediate requirements: These are immediate requirements that were set on the day we visited this care home. The registered person had to meet these within 48 hours. No. Standard Regulation Requirement Timescale for action Statutory requirements These requirements set out what the registered person must do to meet the Care Standards Act 2000, Regulations 2001 and the National Minimum Standards. The registered person(s) must do this within the timescales we have set. No. Standard Regulation Requirement Timescale for action 1 9 13 Facilities must be provided 31/12/2010 and maintained for the exclusive storage of medicines and related items. This will ensure that all medicines are stored safely and securely at the correct temperature and in line with best practice guidance. A programme of routine 31/12/2010 maintenance and renewal of the fabric and decoration of the premises is produced and implemented and records kept.. So that service users live in an attractive and comfortable environment that promotes their well being. 2 19 23 Care Homes for Older People Page 10 of 12 Recommendations These recommendations are taken from the best practice described in the National Minimum Standards and the registered person(s) should consider them as a way of improving their service. No Refer to Standard Good Practice Recommendations 1 8 All service users with dementia should have a mental health assessment carried out to identify and monitor their psychological needs. Records of personal hygiene should be consistently completed to show all assistance provided. 2 8 Care Homes for Older People Page 11 of 12 Reader Information Document Purpose: Author: Audience: Further copies from: Inspection Report Care Quality Commission General Public 0870 240 7535 (telephone order line) Our duty to regulate social care services is set out in the Care Standards Act 2000. Copies of the National Minimum Standards –Care Homes for Older People can be found at www.dh.gov.uk or got from The Stationery Office (TSO) PO Box 29, St Crispins, Duke Street, Norwich, NR3 1GN. Tel: 0870 600 5522. Online ordering from the Stationery Office is also available: www.tso.co.uk/bookshop Helpline: Telephone: 03000 616161 Email: enquiries@cqc.org.uk Web: www.cqc.org.uk We want people to be able to access this information. If you would like a summary in a different format or language please contact our helpline or go to our website. © Care Quality Commission 2010 This publication may be reproduced in whole or in part in any format or medium for noncommercial purposes, provided that it is reproduced accurately and not used in a derogatory manner or in a misleading context. The source should be acknowledged, by showing the publication title and © Care Quality Commission 2010. Care Homes for Older People Page 12 of 12 - Please note that this information is included on www.bestcarehome.co.uk under license from the regulator. Re-publishing this information is in breach of the terms of use of that website. 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