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Care Home: Woodside Home for the Elderly

  • Burnley Road Padiham Burnley Lancashire BB12 8SD
  • Tel: 01282774457
  • Fax:
  • Planned feature Advertise here!

  • Latitude: 53.798000335693
    Longitude: -2.3069999217987
  • Manager: Miss Pauline O`Neill
  • Price p/w: ~
  • UK
  • Total Capacity: 44
  • Type: Care home only
  • Provider: Lancashire County Care Services
  • Ownership: Local Authority
  • Care Home ID: 18326
Residents Needs:
Old age, not falling within any other category, mental health, excluding learning disability or dementia, Dementia, Learning disability

Latest Inspection

This is the latest available inspection report for this service, carried out on 19th August 2009. CQC found this care home to be providing an Good service.

The inspector made no statutory requirements on the home as a result of this inspection and there were no outstanding actions from the previous inspection report.

For extracts, read the latest CQC inspection for Woodside Home for the Elderly.

What the care home does well The admission process included an assessment of people`s needs, prior to them moving into the home. This enabled the registered manager and prospective residents to determine whether or not their needs could be met within the home. The residents also had access to useful information in a suitable format so they could read about the services and facilities available in the home. All residents had a care plan based on their assessment of needs. The plans provided guidance for staff on how to meet people`s personal, health and social needs. The residents were involved in the care planning process, which meant they were able to express their views about the frequency and type of care they received. Woodside Home for the Elderly DS0000035069.V376589.R01.S.doc Version 5.2 The daily routines were flexible and were designed to meet the needs and wishes of the residents. The residents spoken to felt they were well cared for and the staff respected their rights to privacy and dignity. One resident commented in a questionnaire, “The staff are very caring and understanding”. A programme of activities was arranged each day in line with the needs and preferences of the residents. The activities were arranged on different units to encourage the residents to meet people living in different areas of the home. Relatives and carers were made welcome in the home at any time and could join in planned activities, which included birthday parties. The relatives spoken to were very complimentary about the care provided. One person told us, “It’s a marvellous home, the staff are very kind and I have nothing but praise”. The residents were served varied and well balanced meals. Everyone spoken to made complimentary comments about the food. The residents were provided with clean comfortable bedrooms, which they could personalise with their own belongings. The sitting areas were decorated in a homely fashion, with a variety of armchairs, footstools, side tables, ornaments and pictures. All the care staff had achieved NVQ (National Vocational Qualification) level 2. This qualification provided the staff with the necessary knowledge to carry out their role effectively. The registered manager had developed a quality assurance system, which was based on the outcomes of the residents. This meant the residents were able to have some input into the future development of the service. What has improved since the last inspection? Since the last inspection, information about the residents’ healthcare needs had been incorporated into the care plans. This meant the staff were provided with details about how to manage and respond to these needs. A nutritional policy had been introduced, which was supported by a range of information about managing the residents’ nutritional needs. This ensured the staff were aware of the importance of a healthy diet and the benefits of good hydration. The management of medication had been improved and audits had been carried out on a regular basis to ensure the residents received their medication in a safe and consistent manner. A member of the management team had been designated as the activity coordinator and the activity programme had been developed to include specific projects for example, growing sunflowers, card making and reminiscence boxes. The residents had also enjoyed more trips outside the home to places of interest and entertainment.Woodside Home for the ElderlyDS0000035069.V376589.R01.S.docVersion 5.2The meal times had been changed to reflect the residents’ choice and the main meal was served at tea time. These changes had been put in place following consultation with the residents. The residents spoken with during the visit were happy with these arrangements and said they preferred having a lighter meal at lunch time, especially if they had eaten a late breakfast. A front door sensor had been installed to facilitate resident independence and alert staff to any safety and security issues. Four large flat screen televisions had also been purchased and installed in the communal areas. This meant it was easier for the residents to watch television. What the care home could do better: All the legal requirements from the previous key inspection had been met and there were no requirements made at this inspection. The residents were satisfied with the care they received and the registered manager was committed to the development of the service in line with the needs and wishes of the residents. Key inspection report CARE HOMES FOR OLDER PEOPLE Woodside Home for the Elderly Burnley Road Padiham Burnley Lancashire BB12 8SD Lead Inspector Julie Playfer Key Unannounced Inspection 19th August 2009 09:00 DS0000035069.V376589.R01.S.do c Version 5.2 Page 1 This report is a review of the quality of outcomes that people experience in this care home. We believe high quality care should: • • • • • Be safe Have the right outcomes, including clinical outcomes Be a good experience for the people that use it Help prevent illness, and promote healthy, independent living Be available to those who need it when they need it. We review the quality of the service against outcomes from the National Minimum Standards (NMS). Those standards are written by the Department of Health for each type of care service. Copies of the National Minimum Standards – Care homes for older people can be found at www.dh.gov.uk or bought from The Stationery Office (TSO) PO Box 29, St Crispins, Duke Street, Norwich, NR3 1GN. Tel: 0870 600 5522. Online ordering from the Stationery Office is also available: www.tso.co.uk/bookshop. The mission of the Care Quality Commission is to make care better for people by: • Regulating health and adult social care services to ensure quality and safety standards, drive improvement and stamp out bad practice • Protecting the rights of people who use services, particularly the most vulnerable and those detained under the Mental Health Act 1983 • Providing accessible, trustworthy information on the quality of care and services so people can make better decisions about their care and so that commissioners and providers of services can improve services. • Providing independent public accountability on how commissioners and providers of services are improving the quality of care and providing value for money. Woodside Home for the Elderly DS0000035069.V376589.R01.S.doc Version 5.2 Page 2 Reader Information Document Purpose Author Audience Further copies from Copyright Inspection Report Care Quality Commission General Public 0870 240 7535 (telephone order line) Copyright © (2009) Care Quality Commission (CQC). This publication may be reproduced in whole or in part, free of charge, in any format or medium provided that it is not used for commercial gain. This consent is subject to the material being reproduced accurately and on proviso that it is not used in a derogatory manner or misleading context. The material should be acknowledged as CQC copyright, with the title and date of publication of the document specified. www.cqc.org.uk Internet address Woodside Home for the Elderly DS0000035069.V376589.R01.S.doc Version 5.2 Page 3 SERVICE INFORMATION Name of service Woodside Home for the Elderly Address Burnley Road Padiham Burnley Lancashire BB12 8SD 01282 774457 Telephone number Fax number Email address Provider Web address Name of registered provider(s)/company (if applicable) Name of registered manager (if applicable) Type of registration No. of places registered (if applicable) Lancashire County Care Services Pauline O`Neill Care Home 44 Category(ies) of Dementia - over 65 years of age (10), Learning registration, with number disability over 65 years of age (1), Mental of places Disorder, excluding learning disability or dementia - over 65 years of age (3), Old age, not falling within any other category (30) Woodside Home for the Elderly DS0000035069.V376589.R01.S.doc Version 5.2 Page 4 SERVICE INFORMATION Conditions of registration: 1. The home is registered to take people in the following categories: OP- Older age not falling within any other category - 30 DE(E) Dementia over 65 years of age - 10 MD(E) Mental disorder, excluding learning disability or dementia over 65 years of age - 3 LD(E) Learning Disability over 65 years of age - 1 20th August 2008 Date of last inspection Brief Description of the Service: Woodside is registered to provide personal care and accommodation for a total of 43 people. The home is owned and operated by Lancashire County Care Services and was extensively refurbished in 2005. Woodside stands in its own grounds close to Padiham town centre. Public transport is accessible from Burnley Road. There are car-parking facilities at the front of the building. Accommodation is provided in 42 single rooms and 1 double room. 19 of the single rooms have an ensuite facility. The home comprises of four units, Alder, Beech, Cedar and Damson. Each unit is self-contained with lounges, dining rooms, bedrooms and bathroom facilities. There is a large conservatory on the ground floor and a designated smoking room. Beech unit provides care for older people with a dementia. The home has been decorated and furnished to a good standard throughout. At the time of the inspection the scale of charges was as follows: standard rate £386.50, higher rate £435.00, self-funding residents £433.50 and residents with a dementia £463.50. The registered manager made information available to prospective residents by means of a statement of purpose and service users guide. These documents were usually given to relatives and/or prospective residents on viewing the home or at the point of assessment. Previous inspection reports can be viewed at the home or downloaded free of charge from the Commission’s website at www.cqc.org.uk Woodside Home for the Elderly DS0000035069.V376589.R01.S.doc Version 5.2 Page 5 SUMMARY This is an overview of what the inspector found during the inspection. The quality rating of this service is 2 stars. This means the people who use this service experience Good quality outcomes. A key unannounced inspection, which included a visit to the home, was conducted at Woodside on 19th August 2009. The inspection was carried out by one inspector, however, the report refers to we as it was written on behalf of the commission. We lasted visited this service on 20th August 2008. At the time of the visit, there were 40 residents accommodated in the home, plus one person in hospital. During the inspection we spent time with the residents, looked round the home, read some residents care records and other documents and talked to the staff, the registered manager and an area manager. We also consulted our records about the service and the information we have received since the last key inspection. As part of the inspection process we used case tracking as a means of gathering information. This process allows us to focus on a small group of people staying in the home, to assess the quality of the service provided. Prior to the inspection, the registered manager completed an Annual Quality Assurance Assessment known as AQAA, which is a self assessment questionnaire covering all aspects of the management of the home. This provided us with useful information and evidence for the inspection. Satisfaction questionnaires were sent to the home for distribution to some of the staff and residents. Eight questionnaires were received from the residents and seventeen were returned from the staff. Some of the residents relatives had also made comments on the questionnaires. The responses from the questionnaires were collated and used throughout the inspection process. What the service does well: The admission process included an assessment of peoples needs, prior to them moving into the home. This enabled the registered manager and prospective residents to determine whether or not their needs could be met within the home. The residents also had access to useful information in a suitable format so they could read about the services and facilities available in the home. All residents had a care plan based on their assessment of needs. The plans provided guidance for staff on how to meet peoples personal, health and social needs. The residents were involved in the care planning process, which meant they were able to express their views about the frequency and type of care they received. Woodside Home for the Elderly DS0000035069.V376589.R01.S.doc Version 5.2 Page 6 The daily routines were flexible and were designed to meet the needs and wishes of the residents. The residents spoken to felt they were well cared for and the staff respected their rights to privacy and dignity. One resident commented in a questionnaire, “The staff are very caring and understanding”. A programme of activities was arranged each day in line with the needs and preferences of the residents. The activities were arranged on different units to encourage the residents to meet people living in different areas of the home. Relatives and carers were made welcome in the home at any time and could join in planned activities, which included birthday parties. The relatives spoken to were very complimentary about the care provided. One person told us, “It’s a marvellous home, the staff are very kind and I have nothing but praise”. The residents were served varied and well balanced meals. Everyone spoken to made complimentary comments about the food. The residents were provided with clean comfortable bedrooms, which they could personalise with their own belongings. The sitting areas were decorated in a homely fashion, with a variety of armchairs, footstools, side tables, ornaments and pictures. All the care staff had achieved NVQ (National Vocational Qualification) level 2. This qualification provided the staff with the necessary knowledge to carry out their role effectively. The registered manager had developed a quality assurance system, which was based on the outcomes of the residents. This meant the residents were able to have some input into the future development of the service. What has improved since the last inspection? Since the last inspection, information about the residents’ healthcare needs had been incorporated into the care plans. This meant the staff were provided with details about how to manage and respond to these needs. A nutritional policy had been introduced, which was supported by a range of information about managing the residents’ nutritional needs. This ensured the staff were aware of the importance of a healthy diet and the benefits of good hydration. The management of medication had been improved and audits had been carried out on a regular basis to ensure the residents received their medication in a safe and consistent manner. A member of the management team had been designated as the activity coordinator and the activity programme had been developed to include specific projects for example, growing sunflowers, card making and reminiscence boxes. The residents had also enjoyed more trips outside the home to places of interest and entertainment. Woodside Home for the Elderly DS0000035069.V376589.R01.S.doc Version 5.2 Page 7 The meal times had been changed to reflect the residents’ choice and the main meal was served at tea time. These changes had been put in place following consultation with the residents. The residents spoken with during the visit were happy with these arrangements and said they preferred having a lighter meal at lunch time, especially if they had eaten a late breakfast. A front door sensor had been installed to facilitate resident independence and alert staff to any safety and security issues. Four large flat screen televisions had also been purchased and installed in the communal areas. This meant it was easier for the residents to watch television. What they could do better: If you want to know what action the person responsible for this care home is taking following this report, you can contact them using the details on page 4. The report of this inspection is available from our website www.cqc.org.uk. You can get printed copies from enquiries@cqc.org.uk or by telephoning our order line – 0870 240 7535. Woodside Home for the Elderly DS0000035069.V376589.R01.S.doc Version 5.2 Page 8 DETAILS OF INSPECTOR FINDINGS CONTENTS Choice of Home (Standards 1–6) Health and Personal Care (Standards 7-11) Daily Life and Social Activities (Standards 12-15) Complaints and Protection (Standards 16-18) Environment (Standards 19-26) Staffing (Standards 27-30) Management and Administration (Standards 31-38) Scoring of Outcomes Statutory Requirements Identified During the Inspection Woodside Home for the Elderly DS0000035069.V376589.R01.S.doc Version 5.2 Page 9 Choice of Home The intended outcomes for Standards 1 – 6 are: 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. Prospective service users have the information they need to make an informed choice about where to live. Each service user has a written contract/ statement of terms and conditions with the home. No service user moves into the home without having had his/her needs assessed and been assured that these will be met. Service users and their representatives know that the home they enter will meet their needs. Prospective service users and their relatives and friends have an opportunity to visit and assess the quality, facilities and suitability of the home. Service users assessed and referred solely for intermediate care are helped to maximise their independence and return home. The Commission considers Standards 3 and 6 the key standards to be inspected. This is what people staying in this care home experience: JUDGEMENT – we looked at outcomes for the following standard(s): 1, 2, 3, 5 and 6 People using the service experience good quality outcomes in this area. We have made this judgement using a range of evidence, including a visit to this service. The residents had their needs properly assessed and they were provided with appropriate written information to enable them to make an informed choice about where to live. EVIDENCE: Current and prospective residents had access to written information in the form of a service users guide and a statement of purpose. The guide was available for reference on each unit and in the entrance hall. A member of staff said that the guide was explained to the residents on admission. A brochure was also available, which included photographs of the home and a section on frequently asked questions. This provided the residents and anyone interested in the home with a useful overview of the services and facilities. Copies of the inspection report were accessible for reference purposes in the entrance hall. Woodside Home for the Elderly DS0000035069.V376589.R01.S.doc Version 5.2 Page 10 All the residents who completed a questionnaire indicated they had received enough information prior to moving into the home. New residents were issued with an individual service agreement and terms and conditions of residence. These documents set out the rights and obligations of the residents and the role and responsibility of the registered provider. They also included details about what was included in the fee. The information was meaningful and was presented in a clear format. This ensured that the residents and their representatives were aware of the terms and conditions of residence and knew what they could expect from the service. The personal files of three residents were looked at in detail as part of the case tracking process. The records showed that a full assessment of needs had been carried out by a social worker and a member of the management team prior to admission. Copies of the preadmission assessments were seen on the residents’ files. The assessments were detailed and included information about the residents personal, social, cultural and healthcare needs. However, we noted there was not a specific section on the organisation’s form relating to healthcare needs and there was therefore the potential for some important information to be missed. The assessments covered peoples daily living needs including dietary needs and preferences, hobbies and interests and preferred routines. Wherever practicable, the prospective resident and/or their families had been involved in the assessment process, to ensure their views and wishes were considered and documented. This meant that the registered manager could be confident that staff had the necessary skills and knowledge to meet the assessed needs of people wishing to move into the home. Following the assessment of needs a letter was sent to prospective residents and their families to confirm the persons needs could be met in the home. This meant residents could be assured that the home was a suitable place for them to live. The registered manager confirmed that prospective residents were invited to spend as much time as they wished in the home prior to making the decision to move in. This enabled the person to meet other residents and staff and experience life in the home. Following admission, the individual service agreement stated that a trial period of four weeks was offered to every new resident, so both parties could make sure the placement was successful and the residents individual needs could be met. At the time of admission each resident was allocated a key worker, who helped them settle into the home and complete the relevant paperwork. Intermediate care was not offered at the home. Woodside Home for the Elderly DS0000035069.V376589.R01.S.doc Version 5.2 Page 11 Health and Personal Care The intended outcomes for Standards 7 – 11 are: 7. 8. 9. 10. 11. The service user’s health, personal and social care needs are set out in an individual plan of care. Service users’ health care needs are fully met. Service users, where appropriate, are responsible for their own medication, and are protected by the home’s policies and procedures for dealing with medicines. Service users feel they are treated with respect and their right to privacy is upheld. Service users are assured that at the time of their death, staff will treat them and their family with care, sensitivity and respect. The Commission considers Standards 7, 8, 9 and 10 the key standards to be inspected. This is what people staying in this care home experience: JUDGEMENT – we looked at outcomes for the following standard(s): 7, 8, 9 and 10 People using the service experience good quality outcomes in this area. We have made this judgement using a range of evidence, including a visit to this service. The health and personal care received by residents was based on their individual needs. Care practice took full account of the residents privacy and dignity. EVIDENCE: We looked in detail at the personal files of three residents, to assess the quality of the care planning documentation. From this we could see that each resident had a care plan, which had been developed using a computerised system known as “Saturn”. The Saturn plans covered the residents’ physical, personal and social care needs and were supported by risk assessments. There was also a designated section detailing the residents’ night time needs. This meant the night staff were easily able to identify individual preferences and choices during the night. A personal profile, known as “Getting to Know You”, was completed by the resident and their family alongside the residents key Woodside Home for the Elderly DS0000035069.V376589.R01.S.doc Version 5.2 Page 12 worker. This document provided details about the residents past life experiences and significant events. This meant the staff were aware of what each resident considered important about their lives and helped to prompt meaningful conversations. The care plans were supported by records of personal care, which provided information about changing needs and any recurring difficulties. The records had been made on a daily basis, to ensure staff were provided with ongoing details about the residents well being. Wherever possible the residents and/or their families had been consulted during the development and review of their care plan. The residents had signed the monthly review forms to indicate their participation in the care planning process. The care plans had been updated in line with changing needs, to ensure the staff had access to up to date information about the residents’ current circumstances. The care plans and other associated paperwork were collated in individual files and were stored in locked cupboards on each unit. The staff spoken to during the inspection and who completed a questionnaire said the care plans were useful and easy to follow. One member of staff wrote on a questionnaire, “I find the new care plans easy to use, we struggled at first, but now everyone has a good understanding of how to use them as a daily document”. This meant that the staff were well informed about the residents’ needs and were provided with a good level of guidance on how best to meet the residents’ needs and preferences. Whilst there was no designated section seen within the Saturn plans, information about the residents’ healthcare needs had been incorporated throughout the care plans. This meant that staff had access to information about how best to manage and respond to these needs. The care records seen demonstrated the residents had access to health care services and all were registered with a GP. Specialist advice was sought as necessary from health care professionals, such as the District Nursing Team and Doctors. All residents were supported as necessary to attend medical appointments and records had been maintained to monitor the residents weight, to ensure any significant fluctuations were noted and acted upon. Since the last inspection, a nutritional policy and “toolkit” had been introduced. The toolkit included information and other resources about managing the residents’ nutritional needs. This ensured the staff were aware of the importance of a healthy diet and the benefits of good hydration. Risk assessments had been carried out as necessary, to underpin any risks identified within the care plan. These included moving and handling, pressure sores, falls and nutrition. The risk assessments were supported by risk Woodside Home for the Elderly DS0000035069.V376589.R01.S.doc Version 5.2 Page 13 management strategies, which provided staff with guidance on how to manage and reduce any identified risks. This meant the staff were able to respond consistently and safely to any identified risks. The residents spoken to felt the staff respected their rights to privacy and dignity and all made complimentary remarks about the staff, for instance one resident said “They’re all very good and look after us well” and another resident commented, “They’re very nice and really friendly”. The residents, who completed a questionnaire, indicated that they received the care and support they needed. One person wrote, The staff take excellent care of everyday needs and are very caring and understanding. The staff were observed to interact with the residents in a positive manner and they referred to the residents in their preferred form of address. A good level of social interaction was observed on all the units and the residents were encouraged to engage in conversations. Discussions with staff demonstrated an awareness of treating people with respect and considering their dignity when providing personal care. Policies and procedures were in place to cover the management of medicines and were available for staff reference in the medication record file. The home operated a monitored dosage system of medication, which was dispensed into blister packs by a local Pharmacist. Since the last inspection, the management of medication had been improved and audits had been carried out on a regular basis to ensure the residents received their medication in a safe and consistent manner. Appropriate records were maintained in respect of receipt, administration and disposal of medication and suitable arrangements were in place for the management and administration of controlled drugs. Woodside Home for the Elderly DS0000035069.V376589.R01.S.doc Version 5.2 Page 14 Daily Life and Social Activities The intended outcomes for Standards 12 - 15 are: 12. 13. 14. 15. Service users find the lifestyle experienced in the home matches their expectations and preferences, and satisfies their social, cultural, religious and recreational interests and needs. Service users maintain contact with family/ friends/ representatives and the local community as they wish. Service users are helped to exercise choice and control over their lives. Service users receive a wholesome appealing balanced diet in pleasing surroundings at times convenient to them. The Commission considers all of the above key standards to be inspected. This is what people staying in this care home experience: JUDGEMENT – we looked at outcomes for the following standard(s): 12, 13, 14 and 15 People using the service experience excellent quality outcomes in this area. We have made this judgement using a range of evidence, including a visit to this service. Residents were able to exercise choice and control over their lives to enable them to lead a fulfilled lifestyle. The residents were provided with a nutritious and varied diet, which met with their expectations. EVIDENCE: The residents preferences in respect of social activities and daily living routines were recorded and considered as part of the assessment and care planning processes. Information was also gathered in the Getting to Know You document. A planned programme of activities was arranged on a daily basis in the afternoons and evenings. According information supplied in the AQAA, “The range of activities aimed to offer skill retention, entertainment, diversion and fulfilment opportunities”. Since the last inspection, a member of the management team had been designated as the activity coordinator and the activity programme had been developed to include specific projects for example growing sunflowers, card making and reminiscence boxes. Other regular activities included bingo, dominoes, nail care, discussion and singing Woodside Home for the Elderly DS0000035069.V376589.R01.S.doc Version 5.2 Page 15 and dancing. The activities were arranged on different units to encourage the residents to meet people in different areas of the home. The residents said there were plenty of activities available and they could join in as they wished. The residents were also given the opportunity to go on regular trips out of the home. One resident who returned a questionnaire commented, “I do like the trips out and I like to join in everything that is going on” and member of staff wrote on a questionnaire, “I think the trips out are well organised and the residents really enjoy them”. The residents said they had recently been to Cleveleys, Towneley Park and Morecambe. Some residents who were unable to go on all day trips had enjoyed shorter journeys around the local countryside. The residents were consulted at regular residents’ meetings about what activities they wished to pursue. Information about forthcoming activities was displayed on notice boards in the main hall way and around the home. Some residents also liked to visit the local shops in Padiham town centre on an individual basis. Outdoor space at the home was used whenever possible for social and recreational activities, including gardening. On the day of the inspection the residents were observed to be chatting to staff, watching television and sitting in the garden. The residents were supported to follow their chosen religion and their preferences were documented in the care plan. Representatives from the local church visited the residents for communion and prayers and an interdenominational service was held every Sunday, for all those residents wishing to participate. The routines were flexible and were primarily designed to meet the needs of the residents. The residents spoken to said they had a choice in the times they got up and went to bed. One person said, “I can do what I like, the staff fit in with us”. The staff were observed to seek the residents views throughout the inspection and the residents spoken to said they felt comfortable to comment on life in the home. The residents had the opportunity to develop and maintain important personal and family relationships. There were no restrictions placed on visiting times and residents were able to receive their guests in private, should they wish to do so. Refreshments were offered to visitors, to ensure they felt welcome in the home. The relatives who made comments on the questionnaires were very pleased with the quality of care provided. One person wrote, “Mum is well looked after and we the family have peace of mind that she is being booked after so well”. Similar comments were received from visitors during the inspection, one person said, “They’re absolutely fantastic, nothing is too much trouble for the staff, I have nothing but praise”. All the residents spoken to said they liked the food provided. There was a choice of food each meal time and residents were asked the day before what choice they wished to make. The food was mostly homemade and breakfast Woodside Home for the Elderly DS0000035069.V376589.R01.S.doc Version 5.2 Page 16 was served throughout the morning to suit the preferences of the residents, who wished to have a lie in. The menu was displayed on each unit, so the residents were aware of the forthcoming meal. Residents were asked their opinion of the food on an ongoing basis and they could make suggestions for future meals. The meal served on the day of the inspection looked appetising and was well presented. Residents were given sensitive and appropriate support to eat their meals. Drinks and snacks were served throughout the day and at other times on request. Since the last inspection, the meal times had been changed to reflect the residents’ choice and the main meal was served at tea time. These changes had been put in place following consultation with the residents. The residents spoken with during the visit were happy with these arrangements and said they preferred having a lighter meal at lunch time, especially if they had eaten later breakfast. Woodside Home for the Elderly DS0000035069.V376589.R01.S.doc Version 5.2 Page 17 Complaints and Protection The intended outcomes for Standards 16 - 18 are: 16. 17. 18. Service users and their relatives and friends are confident that their complaints will be listened to, taken seriously and acted upon. Service users’ legal rights are protected. Service users are protected from abuse. The Commission considers Standards 16 and 18 the key standards to be. This is what people staying in this care home experience: JUDGEMENT – we looked at outcomes for the following standard(s): 16 and 18 People using the service experience good quality outcomes in this area. We have made this judgement using a range of evidence, including a visit to this service. The residents knew how to raise concerns or complaints and were confident that the management would address any worries promptly. Policies and procedures were in place to respond effectively to any allegations or suspicions of abuse. EVIDENCE: Arrangements were in place to ensure the registered manager and staff listened to and acted on the views and any concerns of the residents. This was achieved during daily conversation, one to one discussion, consultation and residents’ meetings and satisfaction questionnaires. The area manager also regularly visited the home and talked to the residents about life in the home. The residents spoken to said they felt comfortable about expressing their views and were aware of whom to speak to in the event of a concern. This ensured systems were in place to ensure any problems could be promptly rectified. An overview of the complaints procedure was included in the statement of purpose and service users guide. The residents also had access to a more detailed Comments, Compliments and Complaints leaflet, which was available on each unit and in the entrance hall. The leaflet was clearly written and Woodside Home for the Elderly DS0000035069.V376589.R01.S.doc Version 5.2 Page 18 contained the necessary information should a resident wish to raise a complaint with the home or the Commission. According to the records viewed at the time of the inspection, three complaints had been made about the service during the last twelve months. All the complaints had been investigated under the homes internal complaints procedure and records had been made of the investigations and outcomes. Policies and procedures for safeguarding vulnerable adults were available and provided guidance for staff should they suspect or witness any type of harm, neglect or abuse. However, the internal procedure seen was not clear about issues of consent. The area manager agreed to clarify this matter with the responsible individual. Safeguarding protocols were incorporated into the induction training and staff received specific tuition as part of their NVQ training. In addition, the majority of staff had recently undertaken a training course on the Protection of Vulnerable Adults, which included the completion of a work book prior to certification. The staff also had access to a whistle blowing procedure, which provided them with information about how to raise any concerns about harmful practice to the relevant authorities. There were established arrangements in place to safeguard the residents financial affairs, which included detailed records and regular audits. Woodside Home for the Elderly DS0000035069.V376589.R01.S.doc Version 5.2 Page 19 Environment The intended outcomes for Standards 19 – 26 are: 19. 20. 21. 22. 23. 24. 25. 26. Service users live in a safe, well-maintained environment. Service users have access to safe and comfortable indoor and outdoor communal facilities. Service users have sufficient and suitable lavatories and washing facilities. Service users have the specialist equipment they require to maximise their independence. Service users’ own rooms suit their needs. Service users live in safe, comfortable bedrooms with their own possessions around them. Service users live in safe, comfortable surroundings. The home is clean, pleasant and hygienic. The Commission considers Standards 19 and 26 the key standards to be inspected. This is what people staying in this care home experience: JUDGEMENT – we looked at outcomes for the following standard(s): 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25 and 26 People using the service experience good quality outcomes in this area. We have made this judgement using a range of evidence, including a visit to this service. The residents were provided with a safe and well-maintained living environment. EVIDENCE: Woodside is a purpose built two storey building, which was extensively refurbished and extended in 2005. The accommodation within the home is split into four separate units, known as Alder, Beech, Damson and Cedar. Each unit is self contained and provides lounges and dining areas along with bedrooms and bathrooms. In addition to the communal space provided on each unit the residents have access to conservatories attached to Alder and Beech units. There is an assisted bath and shower on each unit and nineteen of the single rooms have an ensuite facility. Woodside Home for the Elderly DS0000035069.V376589.R01.S.doc Version 5.2 Page 20 The home has been furnished and decorated to a good standard throughout. Integration between the units was actively encouraged and residents enjoyed free movement around the home. The residents living on Beech unit were supported by staff, whenever they wished to visit other areas in the home. The grounds are extensive and comprise of woodland areas as well as patios for the use of residents in fine weather. Outdoor furniture was available in the gardens, which allowed the residents to sit in groups or spend quiet time alone. Beech unit had a large enclosed garden, which residents on this unit could freely access all times. Since the last inspection, a front door sensor had been installed to facilitate resident independence and to alert staff to safety and security issues without depriving liberty. Four large flat screen televisions had also been purchased and installed in the communal areas. This meant it was easier for the residents to watch television. The residents were provided with appropriate aids and adaptations to assist their mobility and independence, these included Oxford hoists, a stand aid hoist, grab rails in toilets and bathrooms and raised toilet seats. There was a call facility in every room, including the communal areas. The doors to residents’ bedrooms had been fitted with appropriate locks and residents had been issued with keys. It was evident from a partial tour of the building that the residents brought in their own belongings and had personalised their own rooms in accordance with their own tastes and preferences. All residents spoken to were pleased with the standard of furnishing and décor in their bedrooms. One resident said, “It’s absolutely grand, I can’t believe how nice it is”. The home was clean and odour free at the time of the inspection. The residents spoken to said a good level of hygiene was maintained at all times. Woodside Home for the Elderly DS0000035069.V376589.R01.S.doc Version 5.2 Page 21 Staffing The intended outcomes for Standards 27 – 30 are: 27. 28. 29. 30. Service users’ needs are met by the numbers and skill mix of staff. Service users are in safe hands at all times. Service users are supported and protected by the home’s recruitment policy and practices. Staff are trained and competent to do their jobs. The Commission consider all the above are key standards to be inspected. This is what people staying in this care home experience: JUDGEMENT – we looked at outcomes for the following standard(s): 27, 28, 29 and 30 People using the service experience good quality outcomes in this area. We have made this judgement using a range of evidence, including a visit to this service. The staff team were experienced and well trained, which ensured the residents received a consistent and reliable service. EVIDENCE: A staff duty roster was drawn up in advance and this provided a record of the number of hours worked by the staff in the home. All staff who provided personal care were aged over 18 and all staff left in charge of the building were aged over 21. Many of the staff had worked in the home for several years, which meant they had a good knowledge of the needs of the residents. Since the last inspection the level of staff on night duty had been reduced to two members of staff on waking duty and one member of staff on sleeping duty. A member of staff spoken to said this arrangement had “worked out, better than first thought and it had helped having more sensor mats and specific night care plans”. The manager had also been allocated a flexible staffing budget to be able to respond with additional resources to the changing needs of the residents. Woodside Home for the Elderly DS0000035069.V376589.R01.S.doc Version 5.2 Page 22 Lancashire County Care Services operated a recruitment and selection procedure for the employment of new staff, which was underpinned by an Equal Opportunities Policy. We looked closely at the file of one new member of staff to make sure they had been appropriately checked before they started work in the home. From the records seen, we noted that the staff member had completed an application form, provided a full employment history and had attended an interview. Two written references had been obtained along with appropriate Police checks. This meant the member of staff had been fully vetted before she had access to the residents. New employees completed an induction training programme during the first few weeks of their employment. The training incorporated the Skills for Care common induction standards, which provided underpinning knowledge for NVQ level 2. According to information supplied by the registered manager, all the care staff had achieved NVQ level 2 or above. This meant the staff team had achieved the necessary qualifications to enable them to carry out their role effectively. Staff attended both internal and external training courses and had at least three paid days training a year. Training records and certificates seen on the staff files demonstrated that the staff had received recent training on moving and handling, fire safety awareness and safeguarding vulnerable adults. Eight members of staff had also recently completed a Dementia Awareness Training course, which was accredited by the University of Stirling. Staff training records were held on a central database, which meant the registered manager could readily identify future training needs for individual staff and for the staff team as a whole. Members of staff who completed a questionnaire indicated that they received training relevant to their role and were kept up to date with new ways of working. One person commented, “If there is anything we would like help with such as information or further training, we have no problems doing this and we are encouraged by the management team”. Woodside Home for the Elderly DS0000035069.V376589.R01.S.doc Version 5.2 Page 23 Management and Administration The intended outcomes for Standards 31 – 38 are: 31. 32. 33. 34. 35. 36. 37. 38. Service users live in a home which is run and managed by a person who is fit to be in charge, of good character and able to discharge his or her responsibilities fully. Service users benefit from the ethos, leadership and management approach of the home. The home is run in the best interests of service users. Service users are safeguarded by the accounting and financial procedures of the home. Service users’ financial interests are safeguarded. Staff are appropriately supervised. Service users’ rights and best interests are safeguarded by the home’s record keeping, policies and procedures. The health, safety and welfare of service users and staff are promoted and protected. The Commission considers Standards 31, 33, 35 and 38 the key standards to be inspected. This is what people staying in this care home experience: JUDGEMENT – we looked at outcomes for the following standard(s): 31, 32, 33, 35, 36 and 38. People using the service experience good quality outcomes in this area. We have made this judgement using a range of evidence, including a visit to this service. Management and administration practices were effective in ensuring the home was run in the best interests of the residents. EVIDENCE: The registered manager had achieved the Registered Managers Award as well as other relevant qualifications such as NVQ level 4 in Management and an HNC in Social Care. The registered manager had also undertaken periodic training to update her knowledge and skills, which included written and practical risk assessment training and a professional trainer’s course. The manager had many years experience of managing a residential home and had Woodside Home for the Elderly DS0000035069.V376589.R01.S.doc Version 5.2 Page 24 a good understanding of the needs of older people. The manager operated an “open door” policy and staff residents and visitors were encouraged and welcomed into the office if they had a query. This was observed throughout the day of the inspection. The management approach was consultative and there were established ways of working to consult the staff and the residents on an ongoing basis. Relationships within the home were positive and staff spoke to and about the residents with respect. One member of staff wrote in a questionnaire, “We have excellent communications between the staff and the management” and another person commented, “I enjoy working at Woodside, the residents receive a good standard of care and the atmosphere is great”. There was a programme in place for the supervision of staff and the manager confirmed that staff had received formal supervision six times a year, along with an annual appraisal of their work performance. This enabled the staff to identify any future training needs and discuss the care of the residents. In addition to supervision, staff were given the opportunity to attend regular staff meetings and handovers. This meant the staff were able to share experiences and discuss future developments. The service had been reaccredited with an Investors in People Award, which is a professionally recognised quality assurance award and had Preferred Provider Status with the Local Authority. Consultation meetings were held with the residents at regular intervals. During the meetings the residents were asked their views and opinions about key aspects of life in the home, such as menus, housekeeping and activities. The results of the consultation meetings were collated and displayed on each unit. Customer satisfaction questionnaires were distributed every six months and the results and action plan were available for reference on each unit and in the entrance hall. Regular audits were also carried out to monitor the operation of the home, which included medication, care practice, staff training, fire safety and health and safety. The registered manager had produced a Business Plan, which set out the objectives for the forthcoming year. This document linked with the AQAA questionnaire submitted to the Commission. All sections of the AQAA were fully completed and the information provided gave a clear picture of the current situation within the service and the planned areas for development. Appropriate arrangements were in place for handling money, which had been deposited with the home by or on behalf of a resident. A random check of the records and monies deposited on the premises was found to be correct. This meant the residents financial affairs were safeguarded. There was a set of health and safety policies and procedures, which included the safe storage of hazardous substances and infection control. Staff received health and safety training, which included moving and handling, food hygiene, first aid, fire safety and infection control. Documentation seen during the Woodside Home for the Elderly DS0000035069.V376589.R01.S.doc Version 5.2 Page 25 inspection and information supplied in the AQAA indicated that the electrical, gas and fire systems were serviced at regular intervals. The fire log demonstrated that the staff had received instructions about the fire procedures during their induction and were given the opportunity to participate in regular fire drills. This ensured the staff were familiar with the fire emergency procedures. Appropriate arrangements were in place to record accidents and incidents in the home. This ensured that the residents condition was closely monitored following an accident or incident. The Commission had also been notified as appropriate of any significant event in the home. Woodside Home for the Elderly DS0000035069.V376589.R01.S.doc Version 5.2 Page 26 SCORING OF OUTCOMES This page summarises the assessment of the extent to which the National Minimum Standards for Care Homes for Older People have been met and uses the following scale. The scale ranges from: 4 Standard Exceeded 2 Standard Almost Met (Commendable) (Minor Shortfalls) 3 Standard Met 1 Standard Not Met (No Shortfalls) (Major Shortfalls) “X” in the standard met box denotes standard not assessed on this occasion “N/A” in the standard met box denotes standard not applicable CHOICE OF HOME Standard No Score 1 2 3 4 5 6 ENVIRONMENT Standard No Score 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 3 3 2 X 3 N/A HEALTH AND PERSONAL CARE Standard No Score 7 3 8 3 9 3 10 3 11 X DAILY LIFE AND SOCIAL ACTIVITIES Standard No Score 12 4 13 4 14 4 15 4 COMPLAINTS AND PROTECTION Standard No Score 16 3 17 X 18 2 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 STAFFING Standard No Score 27 3 28 4 29 3 30 3 MANAGEMENT AND ADMINISTRATION Standard No 31 32 33 34 35 36 37 38 Score 3 3 3 X 3 3 X 3 Woodside Home for the Elderly DS0000035069.V376589.R01.S.doc Version 5.2 Page 27 Are there any outstanding requirements from the last inspection? No STATUTORY REQUIREMENTS This section sets out the actions, which must be taken so that the registered person/s meets the Care Standards Act 2000, Care Homes Regulations 2001 and the National Minimum Standards. The Registered Provider(s) must comply with the given timescales. No. Standard Regulation Requirement Timescale for action RECOMMENDATIONS These recommendations relate to National Minimum Standards and are seen as good practice for the Registered Provider/s to consider carrying out. No. 1 2 Refer to Standard OP3 OP18 Good Practice Recommendations The assessment format should include a specific section on the residents’ healthcare needs to ensure this information is gathered in full before a person moves into the home. The internal safeguarding procedure should be updated to provide clarity on issues of consent. This is to ensure that any alert is responded to in an appropriate manner. Woodside Home for the Elderly DS0000035069.V376589.R01.S.doc Version 5.2 Page 28 Care Quality Commission North West Region Citygate Gallowgate Newcastle Upon Tyne NE1 4PA National Enquiry Line: Telephone: 03000 616161 Email: enquiries@cqc.org.uk Web: www.cqc.org.uk We want people to be able to access this information. If you would like a summary in a different format or language please contact our helpline or go to our website. Copyright © (2009) Care Quality Commission (CQC). This publication may be reproduced in whole or in part, free of charge, in any format or medium provided that it is not used for commercial gain. This consent is subject to the material being reproduced accurately and on proviso that it is not used in a derogatory manner or misleading context. The material should be acknowledged as CQC copyright, with the title and date of publication of the document specified. 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