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Care Home: 86 Travis Gardens

  • 86 Travis Gardens Hexthorpe Doncaster South Yorkshire DN4 0DP
  • Tel: 01302859510
  • Fax: 01302570954

The service provided at the home is in partnership with Doncaster Metropolitan Borough Council (owner of the property) and is managed by Craegmoor Healthcare Services. The home provides a respite service for up to twelve adults with a learning disability including those with a physical disability who require personal care. People can have up to 42 nights respite a year and the admission can be booked up to three to four months in advance. The home is a modern purpose built building situated within a small complex consisting of two other quite separate establishments, one a resource centre for people with a learning disability and the other a long stay residential care service for adults with a learning disability. The accommodation comprises of 12 single bedrooms 8 on the ground floor and 4 on the first floor. There is no lift to the first floor and so only the more able people are allocated a room on the first floor. Information gained on the 11th June 2008 indicates that the current fees are £588 per week. Additional charges include some meals whilst out of the home and personal toiletries. The home provides information to guests and their relatives prior to admission into the home. Service Users Guides are available on request from the manager. The last published inspection report is available on request and a copy is available in entrance for visitors to read.

Residents Needs:
Learning disability, Physical disability

Previous Inspections

This may not be the latest inspection for this service as we are having techinical problems updating from CQC - please check directly on the regulators website for the most recent report; bestcarehome hopes to be back to regular updates shortly.

For extracts, read the latest CQC inspection for 86 Travis Gardens.

CARE HOME ADULTS 18-65 86 Travis Gardens 86 Travis Gardens Hexthorpe Doncaster South Yorkshire DN4 0DP Lead Inspector Valerie Hoyle Key Unannounced Inspection 11th June 2008 11:00 86 Travis Gardens DS0000053274.V364934.R01.S.doc Version 5.2 Page 1 The Commission for Social Care Inspection aims to: • • • • Put the people who use social care first Improve services and stamp out bad practice Be an expert voice on social care Practise what we preach in our own organisation Reader Information Document Purpose Author Audience Further copies from Copyright Inspection Report CSCI General Public 0870 240 7535 (telephone order line) This report is copyright Commission for Social Care Inspection (CSCI) and may only be used in its entirety. Extracts may not be used or reproduced without the express permission of CSCI www.csci.org.uk Internet address 86 Travis Gardens DS0000053274.V364934.R01.S.doc Version 5.2 Page 2 This is a report of an inspection to assess whether services are meeting the needs of people who use them. The legal basis for conducting inspections is the Care Standards Act 2000 and the relevant National Minimum Standards for this establishment are those for Care Homes for Adults 18-65. They can be found at www.dh.gov.uk or obtained from The Stationery Office (TSO) PO Box 29, St Crispins, Duke Street, Norwich, NR3 1GN. Tel: 0870 600 5522. Online ordering: www.tso.co.uk/bookshop This report is a public document. Extracts may not be used or reproduced without the prior permission of the Commission for Social Care Inspection. 86 Travis Gardens DS0000053274.V364934.R01.S.doc Version 5.2 Page 3 SERVICE INFORMATION Name of service 86 Travis Gardens Address 86 Travis Gardens Hexthorpe Doncaster South Yorkshire DN4 0DP 01302 859510 01302 570954 travis.respite@craegmoor.co.uk Telephone number Fax number Email address Provider Web address Name of registered provider(s)/company (if applicable) Name of registered manager (if applicable) Type of registration No. of places registered (if applicable) Craegmoor Homes Ltd Ms Kay Bliss Care Home 12 Category(ies) of Learning disability (12), Physical disability (12) registration, with number of places 86 Travis Gardens DS0000053274.V364934.R01.S.doc Version 5.2 Page 4 SERVICE INFORMATION Conditions of registration: 1. 2. To allow a named service user to remain at the home using an emergency stay bed. One specific service user over the age of 65, named on variation dated 26th April 2006, to continue to receive respite care at the home. 14th June 2006 Date of last inspection Brief Description of the Service: The service provided at the home is in partnership with Doncaster Metropolitan Borough Council (owner of the property) and is managed by Craegmoor Healthcare Services. The home provides a respite service for up to twelve adults with a learning disability including those with a physical disability who require personal care. People can have up to 42 nights respite a year and the admission can be booked up to three to four months in advance. The home is a modern purpose built building situated within a small complex consisting of two other quite separate establishments, one a resource centre for people with a learning disability and the other a long stay residential care service for adults with a learning disability. The accommodation comprises of 12 single bedrooms 8 on the ground floor and 4 on the first floor. There is no lift to the first floor and so only the more able people are allocated a room on the first floor. Information gained on the 11th June 2008 indicates that the current fees are £588 per week. Additional charges include some meals whilst out of the home and personal toiletries. The home provides information to guests and their relatives prior to admission into the home. Service Users Guides are available on request from the manager. The last published inspection report is available on request and a copy is available in entrance for visitors to read. 86 Travis Gardens DS0000053274.V364934.R01.S.doc Version 5.2 Page 5 SUMMARY This is an overview of what the inspector found during the inspection. The quality rating for this service is 2 stars. This means that the people who use this service experience good quality outcomes. This unannounced inspection of this service took place over 5 hours starting at 11:00 to 16:00; this included a partial inspection of the home. Three people who use the service, one relative (contacted by telephone) and five staff were spoken to during the visit; their views were included throughout the report. Occupancy at this respite unit is consistently high throughout the year. Nine beds were occupied on the day of this inspection. Two peoples care plans (person centred plans) were looked at. Policies relating to medication, complaints, protection of vulnerable adults and handling of people’s monies were looked at. Three staff recruitment and training records were examined to assess how people were protected. Surveys were returned from four relatives and two people who use the service; there views were included in the report. An ASR (Annual Service Review) was carried out on the service on 18th January 2008. The outcome of the review confirmed people continue to receive a good level of service. The registered manager Kay Bliss has been in post for a number of years. She has completed the Registered Managers Award (RMA), and continues to develop her own knowledge and management experience. The AQAA was sent to the home in November 2007, this was returned to us on time which demonstrates responsiveness and cooperation. An annual quality assurance assessment (AQAA) is a self-assessment and a dataset that is filled in once a year by all providers whatever their quality rating. It is one of the main ways that we will get information from providers about how they are meeting outcomes for people using their service. The AQAA also provides us with statistical information about the individual service and trends and patterns in social care. The inspector would like to thank everyone who agreed to being interviewed as part of the inspection process, and the friendliness of staff. 86 Travis Gardens DS0000053274.V364934.R01.S.doc Version 5.2 Page 6 What the service does well: What has improved since the last inspection? What they could do better: People who use the service should be able to participate in leisure activities both inside the home and in the local community during their stay. Relatives said the lack of driver’s means opportunities to go out was limited. Gaps in employment history must be checked on all new staff employed at the home. The application form must be clear and legible to ensure information can be checked for accuracy. 86 Travis Gardens DS0000053274.V364934.R01.S.doc Version 5.2 Page 7 Please contact the provider for advice of actions taken in response to this inspection. The report of this inspection is available from enquiries@csci.gsi.gov.uk or by contacting your local CSCI office. The summary of this inspection report can be made available in other formats on request. 86 Travis Gardens DS0000053274.V364934.R01.S.doc Version 5.2 Page 8 DETAILS OF INSPECTOR FINDINGS CONTENTS Choice of Home (Standards 1–5) Individual Needs and Choices (Standards 6-10) Lifestyle (Standards 11-17) Personal and Healthcare Support (Standards 18-21) Concerns, Complaints and Protection (Standards 22-23) Environment (Standards 24-30) Staffing (Standards 31-36) Conduct and Management of the Home (Standards 37 – 43) Scoring of Outcomes Statutory Requirements Identified During the Inspection 86 Travis Gardens DS0000053274.V364934.R01.S.doc Version 5.2 Page 9 Choice of Home The intended outcomes for Standards 1 – 5 are: 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. Prospective service users have the information they need to make an informed choice about where to live. Prospective users’ individual aspirations and needs are assessed. Prospective service users know that the home that they will choose will meet their needs and aspirations. Prospective service users have an opportunity to visit and to “test drive” the home. Each service user has an individual written contract or statement of terms and conditions with the home. The Commission consider Standard 2 the key standard to be inspected. JUDGEMENT – we looked at outcomes for the following standard(s): 2 People who use the service experience good quality outcomes in this area. We have made this judgement using a range of evidence, including a visit to this service. People who use the service receive a full assessment before they have stays at the home. EVIDENCE: There was a comprehensive assessment used to assess the needs of prospective people, who plan to spend time at the home. The placing authority also provides detailed information about the person’s needs. Examples of completed assessments were looked at, to ensure staff was able to meet the needs of people. New people were always encouraged to visit the home for tea and meet other people and staff, before making decisions about using the respite services. The manager has responsibility to undertake visits to new people to assess their care needs. Relatives and carers were encouraged to be involved in the gathering of information. Surveys confirmed that people receive information from the home prior to their respite stay. A relative said, “there was plenty of opportunities for their relative to visit the home for tea visits and to meet other people who have respite. They always ring me before the planned stay to see if there have been any changes to care needs”. “My son always looks forward to stays at the home”. 86 Travis Gardens DS0000053274.V364934.R01.S.doc Version 5.2 Page 10 Individual Needs and Choices The intended outcomes for Standards 6 – 10 are: 6. 7. 8. 9. 10. Service users know their assessed and changing needs and personal goals are reflected in their individual Plan. Service users make decisions about their lives with assistance as needed. Service users are consulted on, and participate in, all aspects of life in the home. Service users are supported to take risks as part of an independent lifestyle. Service users know that information about them is handled appropriately, and that their confidences are kept. The Commission considers Standards 6, 7 and 9 the key standards to be inspected. JUDGEMENT – we looked at outcomes for the following standard(s): 6, 7 & 9 People who use the service experience good quality outcomes in this area. We have made this judgement using a range of evidence, including a visit to this service. Individuals were involved in decisions about their lives, and play an active role in planning the care and support they receive. EVIDENCE: Two PCP’s (Person Centred Plans) were looked at, some of the information was not completed, although other supplementary care plans was still used while the PCP was being completed. The manager said PCP’s was being developed for all people, as they returned to use the service. The format was comprehensive and used pictures and symbols to make them user friendly. The individual and their family were involved in putting the information together. Comprehensive risk assessments were looked at, they had been regularly reviewed. Staff were proactive in the management of risks to ensure people were able to continue with their lifestyle while staying at the home. People said they were aware of information written about them and had been involved in 86 Travis Gardens DS0000053274.V364934.R01.S.doc Version 5.2 Page 11 putting together their plan. A relative said staff was very good at asking for information; in particular if there had been any changes to their relative’s health. Surveys confirmed that staff continue to meet their care needs while giving encouragement and support to maintain their independence. People bring small amounts of money with them during their respite stay so that they can participate in activities and outings. Facilities were available for guests to keep their money safe in their allocated bedroom or staff can keep the money safe. 86 Travis Gardens DS0000053274.V364934.R01.S.doc Version 5.2 Page 12 Lifestyle The intended outcomes for Standards 11 - 17 are: 11. 12. 13. 14. 15. 16. 17. Service users have opportunities for personal development. Service users are able to take part in age, peer and culturally appropriate activities. Service users are part of the local community. Service users engage in appropriate leisure activities. Service users have appropriate personal, family and sexual relationships. Service users’ rights are respected and responsibilities recognised in their daily lives. Service users are offered a healthy diet and enjoy their meals and mealtimes. The Commission considers Standards 12, 13, 15, 16 and 17 the key standards to be inspected. JUDGEMENT – we looked at outcomes for the following standard(s): 12, 13, 15, 16 & 17 People who use the service experience adequate quality outcomes in this area. We have made this judgement using a range of evidence, including a visit to this service. People were able to make choices about their life style, and supported to develop their life skills. Social, educational, cultural and recreational activities generally meet people’s expectations. EVIDENCE: People were encouraged and supported to continue their education while staying at the home. People attend training centres during the day. Staff escorts people to the centres using the homes mini bus. People were generally admitted after attending training centres, rather than family bringing them to the home. People retuning from centres were greeted by staff and the inspector observed good interaction using various ways of communication. There was a warm and lively atmosphere with everyone chatting about the day they had had. One person said they had been to horse riding which was very enjoyable, even though they were unable to take part fully. 86 Travis Gardens DS0000053274.V364934.R01.S.doc Version 5.2 Page 13 Surveys received and discussion with a relative confirms that people were not able to take part in activities outside the home, as often as they wanted to. The manager said there were only two people who could drive the mini-bus, which means that no drivers were available at week-ends and evenings, to enable trips outside the home to take place. The manager said she had recruited drivers but they were awaiting CRB (Criminal Record Bureau) clearance. She said that activities were continuing in the home but recognised outings were restricted at this time. Meals were well balanced and nutritional and cater for varying cultural and dietary needs of people staying at the home. Staff encouraged people to assist with meal preparation and the laying of tables. People returning from training centres were eager to find out what was on the menu for tea, drinks were offered to everyone, while they waited for their tea. A choice of a lighter lunch was offered to people staying at the home at lunch time, as the main meals are generally at teatime. The provision of respite care at the home means that people return to their families after their stay. Staff were aware of the importance of maintaining routines to ensure continuity of care, for when they return to their own home environment. People were able to maintain and develop new friendships during their stays at the home. One relative said stays were arranged so that their relative was at the home when it was their birthday, so that they could enjoy a party with friends. They said their relative always looked forward to going to Travis Gardens. One person showed the inspector their room; they were able to bring in personal items to make them feel at home. 86 Travis Gardens DS0000053274.V364934.R01.S.doc Version 5.2 Page 14 Personal and Healthcare Support The intended outcomes for Standards 18 - 21 are: 18. 19. 20. 21. Service users receive personal support in the way they prefer and require. Service users’ physical and emotional health needs are met. Service users retain, administer and control their own medication where appropriate, and are protected by the home’s policies and procedures for dealing with medicines. The ageing, illness and death of a service user are handled with respect and as the individual would wish. The Commission considers Standards 18, 19, and 20 the key standards to be inspected. JUDGEMENT – we looked at outcomes for the following standard(s): 18, 19 & 20 People who use the service experience good quality outcomes in this area. We have made this judgement using a range of evidence, including a visit to this service. The health and personal care that people receive was based on their individual needs. The principles of respect, dignity and privacy were put into practice. EVIDENCE: The manager said people retain their own GP whilst staying at the home, although an emergency arrangement can be made if needed. Records examined and discussion with the staff confirmed people’s healthcare needs are met. The manager said people were escorted to medical appointments and comprehensive records were completed to ensure information was shared with those who care for the individual. An audit of medication stocks and records was undertaken and were found to be correct. Staff at the home ask relatives to ensure sufficient medication is provided for the length of stay of the person and that it was labelled and in its original packaging to ensure their safety. People were able to self-medicate during their stay and were provided with lockable cupboards to ensure it is 86 Travis Gardens DS0000053274.V364934.R01.S.doc Version 5.2 Page 15 stored safely. The staff follows procedures to ensure people can safely administer their own medication by following a comprehensive risk assessment. An example of a completed risk assessment was looked, it was detailed and comprehensive. All staff had received accredited medication training provided by a local college, to ensure they have the necessary skills and knowledge to undertake this task. 86 Travis Gardens DS0000053274.V364934.R01.S.doc Version 5.2 Page 16 Concerns, Complaints and Protection The intended outcomes for Standards 22 – 23 are: 22. 23. Service users feel their views are listened to and acted on. Service users are protected from abuse, neglect and self-harm. The Commission considers Standards 22, and 23 the key standards to be inspected. JUDGEMENT – we looked at outcomes for the following standard(s): 22, & 23 People who use the service experience good quality outcomes in this area. We have made this judgement using a range of evidence, including a visit to this service. People who use the service were able to express their concerns, and had access to a robust, effective complaints procedure, and were protected from abuse, and had their rights protected. EVIDENCE: The home had a complaints procedure that was available to people and visitors. The procedure was also referred to in the information given to new people, identifying the stages to follow; this includes the time scales to respond to complaints. The address and telephone number of the Commission for Social Care Inspection was included in the procedure, although the address and telephone number needed to be updated. The manager confirmed that any complaints received were actioned within the timescales stated in the procedures. People said they would tell Kay or one of the other staff if they were worried about anything. Surveys confirmed that they were confident that the home would deal swiftly with problems. The policies and procedures regarding protection of people were of a high quality and were regularly reviewed and updated. The service was clear when incidents need external input and who to refer the incident to. The manager informed CSCI of an incident which was referred to safeguarding adult’s team. The organisation acted swiftly and followed procedures to ensure people were protected. Staff receive regular refresher training on the safeguarding adults, and were fully aware of the whistleblowing procedures. 86 Travis Gardens DS0000053274.V364934.R01.S.doc Version 5.2 Page 17 Environment The intended outcomes for Standards 24 – 30 are: 24. 25. 26. 27. 28. 29. 30. Service users live in a homely, comfortable and safe environment. Service users’ bedrooms suit their needs and lifestyles. Service users’ bedrooms promote their independence. Service users’ toilets and bathrooms provide sufficient privacy and meet their individual needs. Shared spaces complement and supplement service users’ individual rooms. Service users have the specialist equipment they require to maximise their independence. The home is clean and hygienic. The Commission considers Standards 24, and 30 the key standards to be inspected. JUDGEMENT – we looked at outcomes for the following standard(s): 24 & 30 People who use the service experience good quality outcomes in this area. We have made this judgement using a range of evidence, including a visit to this service. The home provides a well-maintained safe environment suitable for people. The home provides a clean and hygienic environment to maintain the health and safety of people who use the service. EVIDENCE: A partial tour of the building found it clean and free from odours. The home provides a number of rooms to enable people to pursue life skills, including two main lounges and dining facility. All rooms were well equipped and bedrooms meet the spatial requirements. People were encouraged to keep their bedroom tidy during their stay. One person said they liked to keep their room tidy, in the same way they did at home. The registered manager said some decoration to bedrooms was needed and a rolling programme was in place to deal with this. 86 Travis Gardens DS0000053274.V364934.R01.S.doc Version 5.2 Page 18 Since the last inspection the kitchen has been refurbished to a high standard, and people can use the facility to assist with meal preparation. 86 Travis Gardens DS0000053274.V364934.R01.S.doc Version 5.2 Page 19 Staffing The intended outcomes for Standards 31 – 36 are: 31. 32. 33. 34. 35. 36. Service users benefit from clarity of staff roles and responsibilities. Service users are supported by competent and qualified staff. Service users are supported by an effective staff team. Service users are supported and protected by the home’s recruitment policy and practices. Service users’ individual and joint needs are met by appropriately trained staff. Service users benefit from well supported and supervised staff. The Commission considers Standards 32, 34 and 35 the key standards to be inspected. JUDGEMENT – we looked at outcomes for the following standard(s): 32, 34 & 35 People who use the service experience good quality outcomes in this area. We have made this judgement using a range of evidence, including a visit to this service. Staff in the home were trained, skilled and in sufficient numbers to support the people who use the service, in line with their terms and conditions, and to support the smooth running of the service. EVIDENCE: Staff rotas were looked at to ensure there was sufficient numbers to meet the needs of people at the home. Staff interviewed confirmed the rotas were a true reflection on the actual staff working. Staff who had only worked at the home for a few months said they had been supported to develop the skills needed to meet the needs of people. One relative said staff were very competent and caring, and always kept family informed of any changes that may occur during their stay. Training continues to be a high priority for staff, which demonstrates a commitment to developing the workforce. A training matrix (training plan) was used to identify gaps in individual’s knowledge, and the manager has responsibility to nominate staff onto internal courses. Breakaway techniques 86 Travis Gardens DS0000053274.V364934.R01.S.doc Version 5.2 Page 20 and methods of communicating with people were available to staff on a rolling programme. Staff have achieved above the required 50 NVQ qualified staff and a number have also achieved NVQ level 3. New staff have commenced NVQ level 2 and had received a comprehensive induction into their role. Three staff files were looked at to ensure the right people were employed at the home to keep people safe. Some parts of the application form was difficult to read, as it had been copied and faxed to the home. References, CRB checks (Criminal Record Bureau) and POVA 1st record (Protection of Vulnerable Adults) was seen, although there was no evidence that gaps in employment record had been checked. 86 Travis Gardens DS0000053274.V364934.R01.S.doc Version 5.2 Page 21 Conduct and Management of the Home The intended outcomes for Standards 37 – 43 are: 37. 38. 39. 40. 41. 42. 43. Service users benefit from a well run home. Service users benefit from the ethos, leadership and management approach of the home. Service users are confident their views underpin all self-monitoring, review and development by the home. Service users’ rights and best interests are safeguarded by the home’s policies and procedures. Service users’ rights and best interests are safeguarded by the home’s record keeping policies and procedures. The health, safety and welfare of service users are promoted and protected. Service users benefit from competent and accountable management of the service. The Commission considers Standards 37, 39, and 42 the key standards to be inspected. JUDGEMENT – we looked at outcomes for the following standard(s): 37, 39 & 42 People who use the service experience good quality outcomes in this area. We have made this judgement using a range of evidence, including a visit to this service. People who use the service were protected by sound management practises, and their views were actively sought to improve the service. Good health and safety procedures ensured they were safe. EVIDENCE: The manager has worked at the home for a considerable length if time. She has achieved the RMA (Registered Managers Award) and continues to keep up to date with her own development by attending training. She works to continuously improve services and provide an increased quality of life for people who use the service. There was a strong ethos of being open and transparent in all areas of running of the home. The manager was service user 86 Travis Gardens DS0000053274.V364934.R01.S.doc Version 5.2 Page 22 focused and leads and supports a strong staff team who have been recruited and trained to a high standard. Quality assurance systems were in place although the last completed survey were dated 2006. Consideration should be given to developing a stakeholder survey that is specific to those who use respite services. The survey should be written in a format that is suitable for service users who have a learning disability, and may have difficulty understanding the written word. Other systems were used to gain the views of people, including a new initiative ‘Your Voice’ where people have the opportunity to meet with area managers to talk about the service and how it could be better. Minutes of recent meeting were looked at. Maintenance and service records examined were up to date and current to the services provided. Accident records were fully completed for both people who use the service and staff and the manager carries out her own investigation. The manager has the required Health and Safety policies and procedures and displays the relevant notices. Fire safety procedures are in place and service records were looked at and were current. Staff receive the required training to update there knowledge of health and safety. 86 Travis Gardens DS0000053274.V364934.R01.S.doc Version 5.2 Page 23 SCORING OF OUTCOMES This page summarises the assessment of the extent to which the National Minimum Standards for Care Homes for Adults 18-65 have been met and uses the following scale. The scale ranges from: 4 Standard Exceeded 2 Standard Almost Met (Commendable) (Minor Shortfalls) 3 Standard Met 1 Standard Not Met (No Shortfalls) (Major Shortfalls) “X” in the standard met box denotes standard not assessed on this occasion “N/A” in the standard met box denotes standard not applicable CHOICE OF HOME Standard No Score 1 X 2 3 3 X 4 X 5 X INDIVIDUAL NEEDS AND CHOICES Standard No 6 7 8 9 10 Score CONCERNS AND COMPLAINTS Standard No Score 22 3 23 3 ENVIRONMENT Standard No Score 24 3 25 X 26 X 27 X 28 X 29 X 30 3 STAFFING Standard No Score 31 X 32 4 33 X 34 2 35 4 36 X CONDUCT AND MANAGEMENT OF THE HOME Standard No 37 38 39 40 41 42 43 Score 3 3 X 3 X LIFESTYLES Standard No Score 11 X 12 3 13 2 14 X 15 3 16 3 17 3 PERSONAL AND HEALTHCARE SUPPORT Standard No 18 19 20 21 Score 3 3 3 X 3 X 2 X X 3 X 86 Travis Gardens DS0000053274.V364934.R01.S.doc Version 5.2 Page 24 Are there any outstanding requirements from the last inspection? No STATUTORY REQUIREMENTS This section sets out the actions, which must be taken so that the registered person/s meets the Care Standards Act 2000, Care Homes Regulations 2001 and the National Minimum Standards. The Registered Provider(s) must comply with the given timescales. No. 1. Standard YA34 Regulation 19 Requirement Gaps in employment history must be explored for all new staff. The application form must be clear and legible to enable information recorded to be checked for accuracy. Timescale for action 14/07/08 RECOMMENDATIONS These recommendations relate to National Minimum Standards and are seen as good practice for the Registered Provider/s to consider carrying out. No. 1. Refer to Standard YA13 Good Practice Recommendations People who use the service should be able to participate in leisure activities both inside the home and in the local community during their stay. 86 Travis Gardens DS0000053274.V364934.R01.S.doc Version 5.2 Page 25 Commission for Social Care Inspection North Eastern Region St Nicholas Building St Nicholas Street Newcastle Upon Tyne NE1 1NB National Enquiry Line: Telephone: 0845 015 0120 or 0191 233 3323 Textphone: 0845 015 2255 or 0191 233 3588 Email: enquiries@csci.gsi.gov.uk Web: www.csci.org.uk © This report is copyright Commission for Social Care Inspection (CSCI) and may only be used in its entirety. Extracts may not be used or reproduced without the express permission of CSCI 86 Travis Gardens DS0000053274.V364934.R01.S.doc Version 5.2 Page 26 - Please note that this information is included on www.bestcarehome.co.uk under license from the regulator. 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