Please wait

Care Home: Chase Heys

  • off Bibby Road Southport Merseyside PR9 7LG
  • Tel: 01704214279
  • Fax: 01704214279
  • Planned feature Advertise here!

Chase Heys is a purpose built establishment providing Residential Care for 31 Older Persons. Chase Heys has twenty respite places and ten intermediate care places. The intermediate care team are present on a daily basis and service users are under the medical care of an appointed GP. The accommodation provides a large sitting room with dining area and three additional separate sitting rooms. Chase Heys has 31 single bedrooms with bathroom facilities adapted to suit the needs of the service users. As the accommodation is situated on ground level there is easy access to the garden areas. The home is situated in a pleasant residential area of Churchtown within easy reach of local facilities and public transport to the town of Southport. Fees for accommodation and care at the home range from £63.95 to £332.50 depending on the length of time staying at the home. Additional charges are also made for hairdressing and chiropody services, newspapers and personal toiletries.

  • Latitude: 53.658000946045
    Longitude: -2.9700000286102
  • Manager: Mr Kevin Edmund Alan Taylor
  • Price p/w: ~
  • UK
  • Total Capacity: 31
  • Type: Care home only
  • Provider: Sefton New Directions Limited
  • Ownership: Private
  • Care Home ID: 4313
Residents Needs:
Old age, not falling within any other category

Latest Inspection

This is the latest available inspection report for this service, carried out on 13th November 2007. CSCI has not published a star rating for this report, though using similar criteria we estimate that the report is Excellent. The way we rate inspection reports is consistent for all houses, though please be aware that this may be different from an official CSCI judgement.

The inspector made no statutory requirements on the home as a result of this inspection and there were no outstanding actions from the previous inspection report.

For extracts, read the latest CQC inspection for Chase Heys.

What the care home does well What has improved since the last inspection? Since the last visit the nurses attached to the primary care trust visit the home daily and attend intermediate care meetings. The home does not employ nursing staff so this has become a useful resource for advice and provides support to staff to enable them to care for people health care needs. The home has been awarded a grant which will enable new dining furniture to be purchased and plans have also been developed for a handrail to be placed around the perimeter of the building. This means that people will have an opportunity to take walks outside the home independently and safely. All new comers to the service are asked to complete a satisfaction survey within 72 hours of entering the home. The manager believes that this gives the staff the opportunity to correct any concerns and helps to ensure that they have a pleasant stay. What the care home could do better: A small fire recently occurred at the home which staff responded to well and showed that they understood fire procedures. However the areas designated as a meeting point following an evacuation contains flowerbeds. The manager believes that a hard surface area would be of benefit as seating could then be provided for anyone who has been evacuated. This would prove very useful and should be considered. CARE HOMES FOR OLDER PEOPLE Chase Heys off Bibby Road Southport Merseyside PR9 7LG Lead Inspector Joanne Revie Key Unannounced Inspection 13th November 2007 9:30 X10015.doc Version 1.40 Page 1 The Commission for Social Care Inspection aims to: • • • • Put the people who use social care first Improve services and stamp out bad practice Be an expert voice on social care Practise what we preach in our own organisation Reader Information Document Purpose Author Audience Further copies from Copyright Inspection Report CSCI General Public 0870 240 7535 (telephone order line) This report is copyright Commission for Social Care Inspection (CSCI) and may only be used in its entirety. Extracts may not be used or reproduced without the express permission of CSCI www.csci.org.uk Internet address Chase Heys DS0000069964.V349175.R01.S.doc Version 5.2 Page 2 This is a report of an inspection to assess whether services are meeting the needs of people who use them. The legal basis for conducting inspections is the Care Standards Act 2000 and the relevant National Minimum Standards for this establishment are those for Care Homes for Older People. They can be found at www.dh.gov.uk or obtained from The Stationery Office (TSO) PO Box 29, St Crispins, Duke Street, Norwich, NR3 1GN. Tel: 0870 600 5522. Online ordering: www.tso.co.uk/bookshop This report is a public document. Extracts may not be used or reproduced without the prior permission of the Commission for Social Care Inspection. Chase Heys DS0000069964.V349175.R01.S.doc Version 5.2 Page 3 SERVICE INFORMATION Name of service Chase Heys Address off Bibby Road Southport Merseyside PR9 7LG Telephone number Fax number Email address Provider Web address Name of registered provider(s)/company (if applicable) Name of registered manager (if applicable) Type of registration No. of places registered (if applicable) 01704 214279 01704 214279 Sefton New Directions Limited Mr Kevin Edmund Alan Taylor Care Home 31 Category(ies) of Old age, not falling within any other category registration, with number (31) of places Chase Heys DS0000069964.V349175.R01.S.doc Version 5.2 Page 4 SERVICE INFORMATION Conditions of registration: 1. The registered person may provide the following category of service only: Care home only - code PC, to people of either gender whose primary care needs on admission to the home are within the following categories: Old age not falling within any other category - Code OP The maximum number of people who can be accommodated is: 31 Date of last inspection Brief Description of the Service: Chase Heys is a purpose built establishment providing Residential Care for 31 Older Persons. Chase Heys has twenty respite places and ten intermediate care places. The intermediate care team are present on a daily basis and service users are under the medical care of an appointed GP. The accommodation provides a large sitting room with dining area and three additional separate sitting rooms. Chase Heys has 31 single bedrooms with bathroom facilities adapted to suit the needs of the service users. As the accommodation is situated on ground level there is easy access to the garden areas. The home is situated in a pleasant residential area of Churchtown within easy reach of local facilities and public transport to the town of Southport. Fees for accommodation and care at the home range from £63.95 to £332.50 depending on the length of time staying at the home. Additional charges are also made for hairdressing and chiropody services, newspapers and personal toiletries. Chase Heys DS0000069964.V349175.R01.S.doc Version 5.2 Page 5 SUMMARY This is an overview of what the inspector found during the inspection. This visit was unannounced, which means the management of Chase Heys were not told we would be visiting, and took place on 13th of November 2007 and started at 9:30 am. Chase Heys is as purpose built resource centre and provides short-term respite care and intermediate care to older people. Intermediate care is care for people who have been discharged from hospital and need additional support and help to get themselves well enough to go back home. The short-term care is for people who want a break from home for example to support their carers to have time perhaps on holiday. No one lives at the home permanently. The inspection of Chase Heys included a look at all available information received by the Commission for Social Care Inspection (CSCI) about the service provided since the last inspection. This included the manager filling in a questionnaire about the home, which gave information about the residents, the staff and the building. This form is called an AQAA. We used this information during our inspection. Comment cards were sent to Chase Heys prior to the inspection for distribution to people staying at Chase Heys, and the staff. The views expressed in these surveys can be found in the summary sections of the report. During the visit a large number of records were viewed. Details of theses records can be found in the evidence section of the report. . The main focus of the inspection was to understand how the home was meeting the needs of the people who stay at the home and how well the staff were supported by the management of the home to make sure that they had the skills, training and supervision needed so that they could do their job well and look after the people who were staying at Chase Heys correctly. What the service does well: The service has produced a variety of information in different formats so that people can make a decision about whether they want to use the service. This reflects good practice and shows that the service accepts that people have different needs and wishes. One person commented that “ I came and visited a friend of mine and I didn’t hesitate when I knew I was being discharged from hospital here.” Chase Heys DS0000069964.V349175.R01.S.doc Version 5.2 Page 6 The service operates a very successful intermediate care service, which enables people to become more independent following illness and return to their own homes again. The home has been adapted over time so that equipment is available for the people to use to carry out specific exercises to enable this to happen. This unit also has a domestic kitchen, which enables people to practise cooking, and washing up before they return to their own homes. It also enables the occupational therapist the opportunity to access their skills and ensure they are safe. One person commented” they’re getting me better- without them I would have had to give up my home” another commented that “ staff are lovely- they don’t rush me but I know I have to try to get better so that I can go home. They’re very kind but they know when to be firm” Overall the manager has a very good understanding of managing risk and regularly revisits areas such as “ medication management” so that medication systems within the home are as safe as possible. This reduces the risk of a mistake occurring and shows that the manager continues to strive for improvement. Staff commented “ the manager always listens” and “ I feel supported in what I do- the manager always tries to help if there’s a problem”. Staff understand peoples health care and support needs and are quick to respond to changes. People commented that the care they received was “ excellent” and that staff” definitely act and listen to what I say” and “ Im always well looked after – this place is second to none” and “ this is a first class service with excellent staff”. Another person commented that “ I’ve been coming for eight years and I look forward to it every time- It’s marvellous”. Staff have received training beyond what is expected to enable them to care for the people who stay there. 72 percent of the staff team have qualifications in care. A team leader who has either achieved or is undertaking a management qualification manages each shift. This is also beyond what is expected and reflects very good practise. This also shows that the service continues to develop and develops its staff. Staff also have a very clear understanding of how to promote peoples dignity and privacy and respect their individual wishes. The service provides activities according to what people would like to do. People are free to come and go if they wish during their stay. The home provides a high standard and choice of food, which is appreciated by the people who have stayed there. One person commented, “ What a wonderful place this is – the food is excellent – I love coming here” another stated” the food is better than a five star hotel “ and another person commented “ I love it here – you get loads of food and its all lovely”. The home is very clean and appears comfortable, homely and warm. One person commented,” its always fresh and clean – I cant find anything to complain about” Chase Heys DS0000069964.V349175.R01.S.doc Version 5.2 Page 7 The manager ensures that robust staff recruitment procedures are in place, which ensures that new staff are suitable for their role, and the people who stay at the home are protected. People are regularly consulted through surveys about their opinion of the service and are actively encouraged to raise any concerns. This is very good practice and shows that the service is willing to listen to and act on the view of the people who use it. The manager has a very good understanding of the national minimum standards for older people (good practice guidelines). This shows that he runs the home within best practice guidelines. Attention is paid to all aspects of Health and Safety including Fire safety to ensure that the home is a safe place for people to stay. What has improved since the last inspection? What they could do better: A small fire recently occurred at the home which staff responded to well and showed that they understood fire procedures. However the areas designated as a meeting point following an evacuation contains flowerbeds. The manager believes that a hard surface area would be of benefit as seating could then be provided for anyone who has been evacuated. This would prove very useful and should be considered. Chase Heys DS0000069964.V349175.R01.S.doc Version 5.2 Page 8 Please contact the provider for advice of actions taken in response to this inspection. The report of this inspection is available from enquiries@csci.gsi.gov.uk or by contacting your local CSCI office. The summary of this inspection report can be made available in other formats on request. Chase Heys DS0000069964.V349175.R01.S.doc Version 5.2 Page 9 DETAILS OF INSPECTOR FINDINGS CONTENTS Choice of Home (Standards 1–6) Health and Personal Care (Standards 7-11) Daily Life and Social Activities (Standards 12-15) Complaints and Protection (Standards 16-18) Environment (Standards 19-26) Staffing (Standards 27-30) Management and Administration (Standards 31-38) Scoring of Outcomes Statutory Requirements Identified During the Inspection Chase Heys DS0000069964.V349175.R01.S.doc Version 5.2 Page 10 Choice of Home The intended outcomes for Standards 1 – 6 are: 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. Prospective service users have the information they need to make an informed choice about where to live. Each service user has a written contract/ statement of terms and conditions with the home. No service user moves into the home without having had his/her needs assessed and been assured that these will be met. Service users and their representatives know that the home they enter will meet their needs. Prospective service users and their relatives and friends have an opportunity to visit and assess the quality, facilities and suitability of the home. Service users assessed and referred solely for intermediate care are helped to maximise their independence and return home. The Commission considers Standards 3 and 6 the key standards to be inspected. JUDGEMENT – we looked at outcomes for the following standard(s): 1,3,6 Quality in this outcome area is excellent This judgement has been made using available evidence including a visit to this service. A range of information is available so that people can make choices about the home. A successful intermediate care centre is operated which enables people to regain their independence. EVIDENCE: The services AQAA was reviewed and the information received from 20 residents surveys were considered. The surveys reflected positively on the service provided. Discussions were held with the manager and 8 of the people staying at the home. The homes customer satisfaction surveys were reviewed, as was the information booklet that is available in the each bedroom in the home. The service provides information in large type format, audiotapes and a variety of languages on request. All of this information is also available on the local councils website. Chase Heys DS0000069964.V349175.R01.S.doc Version 5.2 Page 11 The manager explained that the service provides respite care and more often than not people will be admitted due to urgent circumstances. Planned stays also occur. Assessments are received from Social workers before a person is admitted to the home and this information was available on the care plans viewed. Last year the service provided care and to 600 people therefore the manager is unable to carry out his own assessments. This shortfall has been identified and protocols have been developed to enable people to move swiftly to another service if following admission Chase Heys is unable to meet their needs. The information booklets viewed contained a good overview of the structure of the service and what could be expected. Everyone who was staying at the home agreed that staff had been welcoming and supportive following admission. All agreed that they felt they had been provided with enough information to make an informed choice. Discussions were held with two people who were living on the re enablement unit. Both agreed that their health had improved since staying at the home. Records were viewed which described the support required by each client and a staff member was observed supporting someone with their required care. The staff member was knowledgeable and encouraging. This unit is jointly staffed by the home and the PCT. An occupational therapist and physiotherapist work full time on the unit. In recent years the unit has been improved so that it now contains a fully equipped therapy room (with stairs) and a domestic style kitchen to enable assessments to take place and offer people the opportunity of practising domestic skills. The occupational therapist runs a breakfast club, which encourages people to carry out usual morning tasks as they would at home. Staff dedicated to the unit work on the unit and viewing staff files showed that they had received training in this area. Weekly multidisciplinary team meetings occur so progress for each person is reviewed and if necessary treatment adjusted. Chase Heys DS0000069964.V349175.R01.S.doc Version 5.2 Page 12 Health and Personal Care The intended outcomes for Standards 7 – 11 are: 7. 8. 9. 10. 11. The service user’s health, personal and social care needs are set out in an individual plan of care. Service users’ health care needs are fully met. Service users, where appropriate, are responsible for their own medication, and are protected by the home’s policies and procedures for dealing with medicines. Service users feel they are treated with respect and their right to privacy is upheld. Service users are assured that at the time of their death, staff will treat them and their family with care, sensitivity and respect. The Commission considers Standards 7, 8, 9 and 10 the key standards to be inspected. JUDGEMENT – we looked at outcomes for the following standard(s): Quality in this outcome area is excellent. This judgement has been made using available evidence including a visit to this service. The people who stay at the home receive care and support from staff who understand their needs and are quick to respond to any changes in their health. EVIDENCE: The services AQAA was reviewed and the information received from 20 residents surveys were considered. The surveys reflected very positively on the support and caring attitude of the staff. Discussions were held with the manager and 8 people who were staying at the home. All the people spoken with stated that staff were good at their job, kind and understanding. One person explained that they had been unwell during their stay and stated that staff had supported them to see their own GP and to spend time quietly in their bedroom, as was their choice. This resident also said that staff had been very attentive whilst they had been feeling unwell and had visited their bedroom regularly to offer drinks and light snacks.. The manager stated that Chase Heys DS0000069964.V349175.R01.S.doc Version 5.2 Page 13 staff errs on the side of caution as people more often than not are not well known to them so staff are quick to seek medical advice. Five plans were viewed. Three were for residents who were staying on the respite unit. These were brief but clear and included how the resident wished to receive care and support. The service does not produce in depth plans as turnover is so quick. In order to stay abreast of changes staff have to sign each of the plans to show that they have read them. People spoken with confirmed that they were aware of the plans and had been consulted about how they would like to receive support. Two plans were viewed for people who were staying on the re enablement unit. As this stay is longer and the support required more specific, these plans were found to be very detailed with regular input from the qualified staff of this unit. Staff keep daily records, which reflect the plans of progress in meeting goals. All the plans viewed contained the person’s personal details and had a recent photograph of them. Since the last visit protocols have changed which means that the nurses attached to the rapid response team now visit the home daily. The manager believes that this has been an improvement for the service as health care professionals are available to consult on a daily basis. This team of nurses also attend the multidisciplinary team meetings for the intermediate service. A local G.P surgery provides support to the service and visits the home weekly. People from the surrounding area remain with their own GP during their stay. Everyone was full of praise for the staff team stating how kind and considerate they were. One person was bale to reveal that staff had provided her with a “ do not disturb sign” for her bedroom door so she could complete her personal care in private. Many of the bedroom doors were closed during the visit and staff were observed knocking and waiting for an answer before they entered. Training records showed that staff have received training in promoting dignity and privacy. The services medications systems were reviewed. The service has recently reviewed the medication policy again. This regularly occurs due to the large volume of medications, which pass through the home. The manager regularly looks for ways to improve and reduce the risk of potential mistakes occurring. Record keeping is good with clear records of receipt administration and disposal. The homes pharmacist provides training to staff is in line with the training recommended by the national pharmaceutical association. Staff records viewed showed that this training had been delivered. The manager confirmed that only senior staff administer medication. Chase Heys DS0000069964.V349175.R01.S.doc Version 5.2 Page 14 Medication storage systems appeared robust with all medication cabinets being contained in a purpose built room. Staff take the temperature of the room, the medications fridge and the trolley on a daily basis. A discussion was held with one person, which showed that the person had been provided with support to enable them to self medicate during their stay. Records were in place, which supported this and identified any potential risks. Chase Heys DS0000069964.V349175.R01.S.doc Version 5.2 Page 15 Daily Life and Social Activities The intended outcomes for Standards 12 - 15 are: 12. 13. 14. 15. Service users find the lifestyle experienced in the home matches their expectations and preferences, and satisfies their social, cultural, religious and recreational interests and needs. Service users maintain contact with family/ friends/ representatives and the local community as they wish. Service users are helped to exercise choice and control over their lives. Service users receive a wholesome appealing balanced diet in pleasing surroundings at times convenient to them. The Commission considers all of the above key standards to be inspected. JUDGEMENT – we looked at outcomes for the following standard(s): Quality in this outcome area is good. This judgement has been made using available evidence including a visit to this service. The home meets the expectations of the people who use it. EVIDENCE: The services AQAA was reviewed and the information received from 20 residents surveys were considered. The surveys reflected positively on the service provided and praised the standard and choice of food. Discussions were held with the manager and 8 people who were staying there. The information pack in each of the rooms informs the reader of times that activities occur. The home has an open visiting policy and the people who stay they are free to come and go as they please. People are supported to carry on any outside activities that occur when at home continue during their stay. Visiting on the re enablement unit is more restrictive but this is only because the people who stay their need to carry out their exercise plan as directed in order for their health to improve. Chase Heys DS0000069964.V349175.R01.S.doc Version 5.2 Page 16 The people spoken with agreed that the service provided sufficient activities and that it was nice to have free time to enable them to talk with other people who were staying at the home. Since the last visit the service has started seeking feedback from the people who stay there via surveys. Paid entertainers visit the home monthly. Staff will carry out other activities according to the resident’s preferences. Activities available include: Deal or no Deal, Quizzes, reminiscence, etc. Friday evening is “ `Welcome” night when the home provides an organist and drinks for any new people at the home. Each bedroom contains a TV as well as a cinema screen TV in the main lounge. The home also has two quiet lounges, which are equipped with board games and books. Religious services are held in these rooms for those people who wish to attend. The home provides a variety of home cooked meals. Menus are displayed informing people of choices. Information is available in the information pack telling them how meals are managed and how to make choices. People staying at the home both in surveys and discussions were very complementary about the standard and choice of food. Some people were having meals during their stay, which had not been scheduled on the menus showing the home is able to care for individual needs and choices. The home has a dining room, which is nicely furnished and promotes a sociable atmosphere. Plans have been developed to purchase new furniture for this area. Chase Heys DS0000069964.V349175.R01.S.doc Version 5.2 Page 17 Complaints and Protection The intended outcomes for Standards 16 - 18 are: 16. 17. 18. Service users and their relatives and friends are confident that their complaints will be listened to, taken seriously and acted upon. Service users’ legal rights are protected. Service users are protected from abuse. The Commission considers Standards 16 and 18 the key standards to be. JUDGEMENT – we looked at outcomes for the following standard(s): 16,18 Quality in this outcome area is excellent. This judgement has been made using available evidence including a visit to this service. People are actively encouraged to voice concerns about the service and action is taken when they do. EVIDENCE: The services AQAA was reviewed and the information received from 20 residents surveys was considered. The surveys reflected positively on the service provided. Discussions were held with the manager and 8 people staying there. The services complaints procedure was viewed. The manager explained that a new complaints procedure has been introduced since the last visit following the change in the organisation. This was also viewed. Both met the Care Home Regulations. No written complaints have been made to the service or CSCI since the last visit. The manager explained that people complete satisfaction surveys after 72 hours of their stay. He believed that this gave the people who stay there an opportunity to express any concerns and gave the home the opportunity to fix these before they went home again. The surveys are distributed by Admin staff rather than care staff. This reflects good practise and shows a willingness to seek people’s opinion. Information was also available in the bedrooms about how to complain. Chase Heys DS0000069964.V349175.R01.S.doc Version 5.2 Page 18 The organisation has strong links with the local council, which means relationships, have been developed with local adult protection teams and complaints officers. The home has access to their procedures and has also developed robust polices around the protection of people. Staff training files showed that staff have received training in this area. Chase Heys DS0000069964.V349175.R01.S.doc Version 5.2 Page 19 Environment The intended outcomes for Standards 19 – 26 are: 19. 20. 21. 22. 23. 24. 25. 26. Service users live in a safe, well-maintained environment. Service users have access to safe and comfortable indoor and outdoor communal facilities. Service users have sufficient and suitable lavatories and washing facilities. Service users have the specialist equipment they require to maximise their independence. Service users’ own rooms suit their needs. Service users live in safe, comfortable bedrooms with their own possessions around them. Service users live in safe, comfortable surroundings. The home is clean, pleasant and hygienic. The Commission considers Standards 19 and 26 the key standards to be inspected. JUDGEMENT – we looked at outcomes for the following standard(s): 19, 26 Quality in this outcome area is good. This judgement has been made using available evidence including a visit to this service. People find the home to be a comfortable clean and warm place to stay. EVIDENCE: The services AQAA was reviewed and the information received from 20 residents surveys were considered. The surveys reflected positively on the service provided. Discussions were held with the manager and 8 people staying at the home. A tour of the environment was undertaken. All areas viewed presented as warm, clean and homely. People stated that they thought the home was a nice place to stay. The home provides approximately 16 hours per day domestic cover. Records were viewed which showed that cleanliness of toilets and bathrooms are checked at very regular intervals through out the day. Staff have access to plastic aprons and disposable gloves and were seen Chase Heys DS0000069964.V349175.R01.S.doc Version 5.2 Page 20 using these during the visit. Training records also showed that staff have had training in infection control. The home has a large communal lounge with separate dining areas, two quiet lounges, a dedicated well-equipped therapy room with domestic kitchen for assessments. All were furnished to a good comfortable standard. Funds have been acquired to build a handrail around the perimeter of the building. This will enable people to enjoy the gardens independently whilst practising exercise. Chase Heys DS0000069964.V349175.R01.S.doc Version 5.2 Page 21 Staffing The intended outcomes for Standards 27 – 30 are: 27. 28. 29. 30. Service users’ needs are met by the numbers and skill mix of staff. Service users are in safe hands at all times. Service users are supported and protected by the home’s recruitment policy and practices. Staff are trained and competent to do their jobs. The Commission consider all the above are key standards to be inspected. JUDGEMENT – we looked at outcomes for the following standard(s): 27,28,29,30 Quality in this outcome area is excellent This judgement has been made using available evidence including a visit to this service. People receive care from staff who they like and trust and who have the skills to meet their needs. EVIDENCE: The services AQAA was reviewed and the information received from 20 residents surveys were considered. The surveys reflected positively on the staff. Discussions were held with the manager and 8 people who were staying at the home. Staff surveys (10) showed that staff believe that the service is well run and provides a good standard of care and that they believe that they have had enough training to do their job. This shows that the staff team is stable therefore the people who stay there are more likely to receive support form staff that they know. Discussions with the manager, observing the manager with new staff and viewing staff files showed that the manager has implemented robust recruitment procedures. The staff surveys received also reflected this. The manager monitors response times by staff to answering call bells and takes action if responses are not timely. This reflects very good practise Chase Heys DS0000069964.V349175.R01.S.doc Version 5.2 Page 22 Viewing the staff training file showed that staff have undertaken all expected training but have also undertaken training in specialist subjects such as Parkinson’s disease, diabetes etc. The service provides support to enable staff to achieve NVQ qualifications. 72 percent of the staff employed have achieved these qualifications. Copies of off duties rotas were viewed which showed that the service is staffed consistently. Waking night staff are available over nighttime. A team leader is available on each shift and takes charge of that shift. These staff members have either achieved or are undertaking a NVQ qualification Level 4 in management which is very good practise. Chase Heys DS0000069964.V349175.R01.S.doc Version 5.2 Page 23 Management and Administration The intended outcomes for Standards 31 – 38 are: 31. 32. 33. 34. 35. 36. 37. 38. Service users live in a home which is run and managed by a person who is fit to be in charge, of good character and able to discharge his or her responsibilities fully. Service users benefit from the ethos, leadership and management approach of the home. The home is run in the best interests of service users. Service users are safeguarded by the accounting and financial procedures of the home. Service users’ financial interests are safeguarded. Staff are appropriately supervised. Service users’ rights and best interests are safeguarded by the home’s record keeping, policies and procedures. The health, safety and welfare of service users and staff are promoted and protected. The Commission considers Standards 31, 33, 35 and 38 the key standards to be inspected. JUDGEMENT – we looked at outcomes for the following standard(s): 31,33,35,38 Quality in this outcome area is excellent This judgement has been made using available evidence including a visit to this service. The management structure of the home enables people to express their opinion within an organised and safe environment. EVIDENCE: The services AQAA was reviewed. This had been completed to a very good level and demonstrated that the manager has a thorough understanding of the national minimum standards and the Care Home regulations. The information received from all 30 surveys was considered. The surveys reflected positively on the service provided and the management structure in place. Two surveys believed that small improvements could be made; the remaining 22 stated that Chase Heys DS0000069964.V349175.R01.S.doc Version 5.2 Page 24 no improvements were required. Discussions were also held with the manager and 8 residents. The manager remains registered with CSCI and is very experienced in managing the service. No breaches in regulations were identified during the visit. The manager informs CSCI of any incidents that could affect the well being of the people who use the service. Communication amongst staff in the home is good with six handovers of information occurring per day. Staff are happy in their role and people who stay at the home feel well cared for and content. Every person who stays at the home receives a satisfaction survey for completion after 72 hours and another one before they leave the service. The first surveys were introduced in response to some people raising concerns at the end of their stay, which could have been addressed at the beginning. This shows that the service listens to people’s opinion. The service does not manager personal allowances therefore standard 35 is not applicable. Staff training records showed that staff have received training in all aspects of Health and Safety. On the day of the visit the manager had received a copy of the NHS document ” essential steps to safe clean care” which he intended to implement. The home experienced a small fire recently. People were successfully evacuated however the manager noted this could have been managed better if a flower bed at the rear of the home was flagged over and seating provided in case a long wait outside the home was going to be necessary. This should be followed through. A variety of records and contracts were reviewed which showed that all aspects of the building and its equipment are serviced regularly and checked for safety. This included fire records and maintenance of fire equipment, and also showed that essential checks are carried put by staff at regular intervals. Accidents forms were viewed which had been completed to a good standard. Chase Heys DS0000069964.V349175.R01.S.doc Version 5.2 Page 25 SCORING OF OUTCOMES This page summarises the assessment of the extent to which the National Minimum Standards for Care Homes for Older People have been met and uses the following scale. The scale ranges from: 4 Standard Exceeded 2 Standard Almost Met (Commendable) (Minor Shortfalls) 3 Standard Met 1 Standard Not Met (No Shortfalls) (Major Shortfalls) “X” in the standard met box denotes standard not assessed on this occasion “N/A” in the standard met box denotes standard not applicable CHOICE OF HOME Standard No Score 1 2 3 4 5 6 ENVIRONMENT Standard No Score 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 4 X 3 X X 4 HEALTH AND PERSONAL CARE Standard No Score 7 3 8 4 9 3 10 4 11 X DAILY LIFE AND SOCIAL ACTIVITIES Standard No Score 12 3 13 3 14 3 15 4 COMPLAINTS AND PROTECTION Standard No Score 16 4 17 x 18 3 3 X X X X X X 4 STAFFING Standard No Score 27 3 28 4 29 3 30 4 MANAGEMENT AND ADMINISTRATION Standard No 31 32 33 34 35 36 37 38 Score 4 x 4 x x x x 3 Chase Heys DS0000069964.V349175.R01.S.doc Version 5.2 Page 26 Are there any outstanding requirements from the last inspection? no STATUTORY REQUIREMENTS This section sets out the actions, which must be taken so that the registered person/s meets the Care Standards Act 2000, Care Homes Regulations 2001 and the National Minimum Standards. The Registered Provider(s) must comply with the given timescales. No. Standard Regulation Requirement Timescale for action RECOMMENDATIONS These recommendations relate to National Minimum Standards and are seen as good practice for the Registered Provider/s to consider carrying out. No. 1. Refer to Standard OP38 Good Practice Recommendations The organisation should act on the recommendations that the grounds are altered to provide a fixed evacuation area with seating. This would promote comfort for the people staying at the home should a long wait be needed following an evacuation. Chase Heys DS0000069964.V349175.R01.S.doc Version 5.2 Page 27 Commission for Social Care Inspection Merseyside Area Office 2nd Floor South Wing Burlington House Crosby Road North Liverpool L22 0LG National Enquiry Line: Telephone: 0845 015 0120 or 0191 233 3323 Textphone: 0845 015 2255 or 0191 233 3588 Email: enquiries@csci.gsi.gov.uk Web: www.csci.org.uk © This report is copyright Commission for Social Care Inspection (CSCI) and may only be used in its entirety. Extracts may not be used or reproduced without the express permission of CSCI Chase Heys DS0000069964.V349175.R01.S.doc Version 5.2 Page 28 - Please note that this information is included on www.bestcarehome.co.uk under license from the regulator. Re-publishing this information is in breach of the terms of use of that website. Discrete codes and changes have been inserted throughout the textual data shown on the site that will provide incontrovertable proof of copying in the event this information is re-published on other websites. The policy of www.bestcarehome.co.uk is to use all legal avenues to pursue such offenders, including recovery of costs. You have been warned!

Other inspections for this house

Chase Heys 19/07/07

The Provider has not yet updated their profile and added details of the services and facilities they offer. If you are the provider and would like to do this, please click the "Do you run this home" button under the Description tab.

The Provider has not yet updated their profile and added details of the services and facilities they offer. If you are the provider and would like to do this, please click the "Do you run this home" button under the Description tab.

Promote this care home

Click here for links and widgets to increase enquiries and referrals for this care home.

  • Widgets to embed inspection reports into your website
  • Formated links to this care home profile
  • Links to the latest inspection report
  • Widget to add iPaper version of SoP to your website