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Care Home: Davey Court

  • Buckingham Close Exmouth Devon EX8 2JB
  • Tel: 01395273860
  • Fax: 01395223072

Davey Court is registered to provide specialised care for up to 43 people with dementia. The home is situated on the outskirts of Exmouth in a quiet residential area. The building consists of two floors and there is level access to both. The first floor is served by a passenger lift. There are attractive gardens outside. Although most bedrooms are small, all are single rooms, and there is ample communal space including 4 dining areas, 4 lounges and a conservatory. A copy of the last inspection report is pinned to the notice board in the entrance hall. The weekly fee for the home is £599.34.Davey CourtDS0000039203.V378172.R01.S.docVersion 5.2

  • Latitude: 50.622001647949
    Longitude: -3.3870000839233
  • Manager: Mrs Christine Joyce Burrows
  • Price p/w: £599
  • UK
  • Total Capacity: 43
  • Type: Care home only
  • Provider: Devon County Council
  • Ownership: Local Authority
  • Care Home ID: 5358
Residents Needs:
Dementia, Old age, not falling within any other category

Previous Inspections

This may not be the latest inspection for this service as we are having techinical problems updating from CQC - please check directly on the regulators website for the most recent report; bestcarehome hopes to be back to regular updates shortly.

For extracts, read the latest CQC inspection for Davey Court.

Key inspection report CARE HOMES FOR OLDER PEOPLE Davey Court Buckingham Close Exmouth Devon EX8 2JB Lead Inspector Graham Thomas Key Unannounced Inspection 3rd September 2009 09:00 DS0000039203.V378172.R01.S.do c Version 5.3 Page 1 This report is a review of the quality of outcomes that people experience in this care home. We believe high quality care should: • • • • • Be safe Have the right outcomes, including clinical outcomes Be a good experience for the people that use it Help prevent illness, and promote healthy, independent living Be available to those who need it when they need it. We review the quality of the service against outcomes from the National Minimum Standards (NMS). Those standards are written by the Department of Health for each type of care service. Copies of the National Minimum Standards – Care homes for older people can be found at www.dh.gov.uk or bought from The Stationery Office (TSO) PO Box 29, St Crispins, Duke Street, Norwich, NR3 1GN. Tel: 0870 600 5522. Online ordering from the Stationery Office is also available: www.tso.co.uk/bookshop. The mission of the Care Quality Commission is to make care better for people by: • Regulating health and adult social care services to ensure quality and safety standards, drive improvement and stamp out bad practice • Protecting the rights of people who use services, particularly the most vulnerable and those detained under the Mental Health Act 1983 • Providing accessible, trustworthy information on the quality of care and services so people can make better decisions about their care and so that commissioners and providers of services can improve services. • Providing independent public accountability on how commissioners and providers of services are improving the quality of care and providing value for money. Davey Court DS0000039203.V378172.R01.S.doc Version 5.2 Page 2 Reader Information Document Purpose Author Audience Further copies from Copyright Inspection Report Care Quality Commission General Public 0870 240 7535 (telephone order line) Copyright © (2009) Care Quality Commission (CQC). This publication may be reproduced in whole or in part, free of charge, in any format or medium provided that it is not used for commercial gain. This consent is subject to the material being reproduced accurately and on proviso that it is not used in a derogatory manner or misleading context. The material should be acknowledged as CQC copyright, with the title and date of publication of the document specified. www.cqc.org.uk Internet address Davey Court DS0000039203.V378172.R01.S.doc Version 5.2 Page 3 SERVICE INFORMATION Name of service Davey Court Address Buckingham Close Exmouth Devon EX8 2JB Telephone number Fax number Email address Provider Web address Name of registered provider(s)/company (if applicable) Name of registered manager (if applicable) Type of registration No. of places registered (if applicable) 01395 273860 01395 223072 christine.cawse@devon.gov.uk http/www.devon.gov.uk Devon County Council Mrs Christine Mary Cawse Care Home 43 Category(ies) of Dementia - over 65 years of age (43), Old age, registration, with number not falling within any other category (2) of places Davey Court DS0000039203.V378172.R01.S.doc Version 5.2 Page 4 SERVICE INFORMATION Conditions of registration: 1. The registered person may provide the following category of service only : Care home only - Code PC to service users of either gender whose primary care needs on admission to the home are within the following categories: Dementia aged 65 years or over on admission (Code DE(E)) Old age, not falling within any other category (Code OP) - maximum of 2 places The maximum number of service users who can be accommodated is 43. 11th September 2007 2. Date of last inspection Brief Description of the Service: Davey Court is registered to provide specialised care for up to 43 people with dementia. The home is situated on the outskirts of Exmouth in a quiet residential area. The building consists of two floors and there is level access to both. The first floor is served by a passenger lift. There are attractive gardens outside. Although most bedrooms are small, all are single rooms, and there is ample communal space including 4 dining areas, 4 lounges and a conservatory. A copy of the last inspection report is pinned to the notice board in the entrance hall. The weekly fee for the home is £599.34. Davey Court DS0000039203.V378172.R01.S.doc Version 5.2 Page 5 SUMMARY This is an overview of what the inspector found during the inspection. The Quality rating for this service is 2 star . This means the people who use the service experience good quality outcomes. Before we visited Davey Court, we looked at our records about the home. This included information sent to us about events in the home called “notifications”. We also looked at what other people had told us about the home. The manager returned an Annual Quality Assurance Assessment (AQAA) to us before our visit. We visited the home and spent a day there. During our visit we toured the home and spoke to people who live there. We also spoke with some visitors, staff and the manager. A number of records were checked including care plans, staff files and records about the running and maintenance of the home. At the time of our visit, there were 28 people living in the home and one person who had recently been admitted for respite care. What the service does well: Before people move into Davey Court, the home makes sure it can meet their needs. When they have moved in, good plans are made so that staff know how to support people. Staff treat people with respect and know how to look after them. There is a safe system for supporting people to take their medicines. People can follow their own routines during the day. There are activities for people to join if they wish. There is a choice of meals every day and people’s individual dietary needs are catered for. Staff listen to people’s concerns and take them seriously. They know what to do to safeguard people from being abused. Davey Court provides a clean, comfortable and safe home with the equipment and facilities people need. There is a programme of maintenance and decoration to make sure the home remains a pleasant and a safe place to live. The system of recruitment makes sure that people are protected from potentially unsuitable staff. Staff are clear about their particular jobs and have the training and support they need. The manager is experienced and well qualified. She has good systems in place to manage and support staff to do their work. There are also systems to Davey Court DS0000039203.V378172.R01.S.doc Version 5.2 Page 6 monitor the quality of the service being provided and make sure it meets people’s needs and wishes. What has improved since the last inspection? What they could do better: If you want to know what action the person responsible for this care home is taking following this report, you can contact them using the details on page 4. The report of this inspection is available from our website www.cqc.org.uk. You can get printed copies from enquiries@cqc.org.uk or by telephoning our order line – 0870 240 7535. Davey Court DS0000039203.V378172.R01.S.doc Version 5.2 Page 7 DETAILS OF INSPECTOR FINDINGS CONTENTS Choice of Home (Standards 1–6) Health and Personal Care (Standards 7-11) Daily Life and Social Activities (Standards 12-15) Complaints and Protection (Standards 16-18) Environment (Standards 19-26) Staffing (Standards 27-30) Management and Administration (Standards 31-38) Scoring of Outcomes Statutory Requirements Identified During the Inspection Davey Court DS0000039203.V378172.R01.S.doc Version 5.3 Page 8 Choice of Home The intended outcomes for Standards 1 – 6 are: 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. Prospective service users have the information they need to make an informed choice about where to live. Each service user has a written contract/ statement of terms and conditions with the home. No service user moves into the home without having had his/her needs assessed and been assured that these will be met. Service users and their representatives know that the home they enter will meet their needs. Prospective service users and their relatives and friends have an opportunity to visit and assess the quality, facilities and suitability of the home. Service users assessed and referred solely for intermediate care are helped to maximise their independence and return home. The Commission considers Standards 3 and 6 the key standards to be inspected. This is what people staying in this care home experience: JUDGEMENT – we looked at outcomes for the following standard(s): Standards 3 and 6 People using the service experience good quality outcomes in this area. We have made this judgement using a range of evidence, including a visit to this service. There is a suitable referral and assessment procedure in place that will assure people thinking of moving into the home that their care needs can be met. EVIDENCE: We spoke with the manager about people moving into the home. Information is routinely made available to people beforehand in the form of a Statement of Purpose and Service users Guide. This information is available in large print and audio recorded formats. Where people are not admitted in an emergency, they receive a visit from the manager at their current residence. They can also visit the home before moving in. Letters are sent to people who are about to move in confirming the Davey Court DS0000039203.V378172.R01.S.doc Version 5.3 Page 9 date of their admission and assuring the person that the home can meet their assessed needs. We looked at the care plan of one person who had recently moved into the home. We found that a thorough assessment of the person’s needs had been completed before they arrived. This information had been carried forward into a care plan for the person. Other files we examined contained examples of the admission documents described. The home does not provide intermediate care. Davey Court DS0000039203.V378172.R01.S.doc Version 5.3 Page 10 Health and Personal Care The intended outcomes for Standards 7 – 11 are: 7. 8. 9. 10. 11. The service user’s health, personal and social care needs are set out in an individual plan of care. Service users’ health care needs are fully met. Service users, where appropriate, are responsible for their own medication, and are protected by the home’s policies and procedures for dealing with medicines. Service users feel they are treated with respect and their right to privacy is upheld. Service users are assured that at the time of their death, staff will treat them and their family with care, sensitivity and respect. The Commission considers Standards 7, 8, 9 and 10 the key standards to be inspected. This is what people staying in this care home experience: JUDGEMENT – we looked at outcomes for the following standard(s): Standards 7, 8, 9 and 10 People using the service experience good quality outcomes in this area. We have made this judgement using a range of evidence, including a visit to this service. People living at Davey Court can feel confident that their health and personal care needs are understood and will be met. Their dignity and privacy will be well respected by the home’s staff. EVIDENCE: A relative wrote to us about the care received by her mother prior to her death. She wrote: “I would like to express how delighted we were with her care”. We looked in detail at the files of three people living in the home and examined how plans were being put into practice. We call this “case tracking”. The files were organised into three parts. These were a file of daily care needs for carers, a plan for the person titled “Your Care Plan” and a file containing archived information. Each plan contained details of people’s individual personal, social, psychological and healthcare needs. Davey Court DS0000039203.V378172.R01.S.doc Version 5.3 Page 11 We saw that the plans were based on people’s assessed needs and described how these needs were being met. For example, one plan described the person’s continence needs. Daily records showed how the person’s nutrition and toileting patterns were being monitored to meet this need. Another person needed help to move from one place to another. We saw that a moving and handling assessment had been completed for the person and that suitable equipment such as a hoist, sling and handling belt was available. Staff records showed that they had received training in moving and handling techniques. The plans we examined had been regularly reviewed and updated. Staff with whom we spoke were clear about the needs of people with whom they worked and how these should be met. People living in the home told us that they would always have access to medical attention if they needed it. The individual records we examined contained details of both routine and specialist medical treatments. These included, for example, dental, foot and optical care. The files also showed evidence of individual nutritional and continence monitoring. We looked at how medicines were managed in the home. We saw that all medicines were securely stored. Most were contained in a locked cupboard in which a locked trolley was chained to the wall. Controlled drugs were held in separate secure storage and keys locked in a separate locked cabinet to which there was limited access. Medicines held in stock were held in another locked cupboard with up to date stock control records. Secure refrigerated storage was available for medicines that required cool storage. The medicines records of the people we case tracked were all up to date and in good order. Controlled drugs were recorded in a separate register with double signatures. Skin creams were labelled with people’s names and the date of opening. A monthly audit of medicines had been conducted, records of which were seen. During our tour of the premises, we saw that staff spoke with people respectfully and maintained good eye contact when providing support and care. A relative with whom we spoke confirmed that staff were always respectful. We saw staff knocking on doors before entering people’s rooms and noted that doors were kept closed during personal care giving. One person with whom we spoke said that a bath was only available weekly and felt that more frequent bathing should be available. Davey Court DS0000039203.V378172.R01.S.doc Version 5.3 Page 12 Daily Life and Social Activities The intended outcomes for Standards 12 - 15 are: 12. 13. 14. 15. Service users find the lifestyle experienced in the home matches their expectations and preferences, and satisfies their social, cultural, religious and recreational interests and needs. Service users maintain contact with family/ friends/ representatives and the local community as they wish. Service users are helped to exercise choice and control over their lives. Service users receive a wholesome appealing balanced diet in pleasing surroundings at times convenient to them. The Commission considers all of the above key standards to be inspected. This is what people staying in this care home experience: JUDGEMENT – we looked at outcomes for the following standard(s): Standards 12, 13, 14 and 15 People using the service experience good quality outcomes in this area. We have made this judgement using a range of evidence, including a visit to this service. People are generally well-supported to follow a lifestyle that meets their expectations. However, further development of the activities programme is needed. EVIDENCE: We looked at how the home supported people to pursue their chosen lifestyles. During our tour of the home we saw that people were sitting together in groups or spending time on their own according to individual preference. Some were watching television reading the paper or chatting with others. Staff had initiated a game of ball catching. This was part of a weekly activities programme that was advertised in the home’s foyer. This programme included, for example, quizzes, table games, ball games, reminiscence and ‘sing song’. A newsletter for people living in the home described live music, a visiting clothes store and excursions. Two people’s individual records showed that one had spent time watching athletics reading and visiting age concern. The other had done jigsaws and had a manicure. During our visit an off-duty member of staff Davey Court DS0000039203.V378172.R01.S.doc Version 5.3 Page 13 came in to take one person on a planned excursion. Staff time is allocated daily for activities. There were individual records of activities in which they took part. However, the activities taking place were not clearly linked to people’s individual interests. More detailed social histories in individual plans would help to individualise the activities programme. We met two visitors to the home. They told us that they always received a warm welcome from staff when visiting. This was confirmed by our own observations. During our tour we observed people taking breakfast and lunch. People were apparently enjoying their meals and receiving discreet assistance where necessary. We examined the home’s menus and spoke with the cook. The menus reflected a balanced and varied diet. On the day of our visit, the lunchtime menu consisted of a choice between savoury mince and onion pie and fresh vegetables or vegetable risotto. This was followed by chocolate sponge with a chocolate sauce or fruit yoghurt. The cook told us about five people with specific dietary needs and how these needs were met. This included, for example, people who required a soft diet. These meals were presented so that each constituent was separate. This is important in providing a variety of different flavours and colours to make the meal appetising. We saw a certificate confirming that the local authority had conducted a catering quality audit and a “gold” standard had been achieved. Davey Court DS0000039203.V378172.R01.S.doc Version 5.3 Page 14 Complaints and Protection The intended outcomes for Standards 16 - 18 are: 16. 17. 18. Service users and their relatives and friends are confident that their complaints will be listened to, taken seriously and acted upon. Service users’ legal rights are protected. Service users are protected from abuse. The Commission considers Standards 16 and 18 the key standards to be. This is what people staying in this care home experience: JUDGEMENT – we looked at outcomes for the following standard(s): Standards 16 and 18 People using the service experience good quality outcomes in this area. We have made this judgement using a range of evidence, including a visit to this service. People living at Davey Court can feel assured that any concerns will be taken seriously and acted upon. Robust systems are in place to protect people from abuse. EVIDENCE: We saw a clear and simple complaints procedure displayed in the hallway which accorded with Devon County Council’s policy. The home’s complaints record showed that there had been no complaints in the last year. However, the home had recorded minor concerns and other incidents and how these had been dealt with. Our own records showed that we have received no complaints about the home during this time. Visitors told us that they had never had caused to complain but felt confident that any concerns would be taken seriously by staff and addressed. People living in the home with whom we spoke were similarly confident that their concerns would be addressed. Staff records showed that they had received training in safeguarding people from abuse and some had been trained in conflict resolution. Those with whom we spoke were clear about how they might respond if they suspected or witnessed abuse and to whom they might report it. Davey Court DS0000039203.V378172.R01.S.doc Version 5.3 Page 15 Davey Court DS0000039203.V378172.R01.S.doc Version 5.3 Page 16 Environment The intended outcomes for Standards 19 – 26 are: 19. 20. 21. 22. 23. 24. 25. 26. Service users live in a safe, well-maintained environment. Service users have access to safe and comfortable indoor and outdoor communal facilities. Service users have sufficient and suitable lavatories and washing facilities. Service users have the specialist equipment they require to maximise their independence. Service users’ own rooms suit their needs. Service users live in safe, comfortable bedrooms with their own possessions around them. Service users live in safe, comfortable surroundings. The home is clean, pleasant and hygienic. The Commission considers Standards 19 and 26 the key standards to be inspected. This is what people staying in this care home experience: JUDGEMENT – we looked at outcomes for the following standard(s): Standards 19 and 26 People using the service experience good quality outcomes in this area. We have made this judgement using a range of evidence, including a visit to this service. Davey Court provides a clean, safe, comfortable and homely environment for people living there. EVIDENCE: Davey Court is situated on the outskirts of Exmouth in a quiet residential area. The building consists of two floors and is easily accessible by those who are wheelchair users. There is free access throughout the home. The first floor is served by a passenger lift. There are attractive gardens outside. The garden has been made a safe environment for people who have mobility problems as well as those who may be at risk of leaving the home unaccompanied. From the conservatory there is level access to the garden area. Davey Court DS0000039203.V378172.R01.S.doc Version 5.3 Page 17 Although most bedrooms are small, all are single rooms, and there is ample communal space including 4 dining areas, 4 lounges and a conservatory. In the AQAA completed by the manager, she told us that in the last twelve months five bedrooms had been decorated, new carpets had been fitted in three bedrooms and a store room converted into a staff toilet. During our tour of the home we saw that communal areas were bight, airy and comfortably furnished. A range of aids and adaptations were seen throughout the home to enable the residents to be as independent as possible and to assist staff with moving and handling of residents. Individual bedrooms have suitable locks fitted to the doors and some residents hold their own keys. Décor and furnishings in the individual rooms reflected the personalities of their occupants. Cross infection in the home’s large, well equipped laundry is avoided by an impervious floor covering and a ‘flow-through’ system of work. All bedrooms and toilets contained liquid soap and paper towels and there was hand gel for visitors’ use in the foyer. Staff records confirmed that they had received training in infection control procedures. During our visit, staff were seen wearing gloves and aprons for cleaning and personal care. Davey Court DS0000039203.V378172.R01.S.doc Version 5.3 Page 18 Staffing The intended outcomes for Standards 27 – 30 are: 27. 28. 29. 30. Service users’ needs are met by the numbers and skill mix of staff. Service users are in safe hands at all times. Service users are supported and protected by the home’s recruitment policy and practices. Staff are trained and competent to do their jobs. The Commission consider all the above are key standards to be inspected. This is what people staying in this care home experience: JUDGEMENT – we looked at outcomes for the following standard(s): Standards 27, 28, 29 and 30 People using the service experience good quality outcomes in this area. We have made this judgement using a range of evidence, including a visit to this service. People living at Davey Court are protected by a robust recruitment procedure. Staff receive the training they need to provide the care and support that people need. EVIDENCE: During our tour, discussions with people living in the home and their visitors we received many positive comments about the staff. A visitor told us that the staff are “really good” and a person living in the home felt that they were “lovely” and “very helpful”. The usual staffing pattern is eight care staff on duty each morning until early afternoon and seven from then until 9.30pm. Two of these staff are senior carers. At night there are two night care assistants and one night care officer on duty. There are also domestic staff, a handyman and cook and at least one assistant manager on duty during the day-time period. At our last visit, the home was heavily reliant on agency staff. On this occasion we found that the use of agency staff had reduced substantially. Adverts had been placed to fill two vacancies for care assistants and this shortfall was being filled by the use of some agency staff cover. Davey Court DS0000039203.V378172.R01.S.doc Version 5.3 Page 19 We spoke with three staff, one recently recruited, and examined their files. In the files we saw that each staff member had undergone a mandatory criminal records check and had supplied at least two references. There was evidence of a formal application and interview process followed by a probationary period. This recruitment process was confirmed by the most recently recruited staff member. We examined staff training which had been produced and held on the home’s computer system. We also saw evidence of training in individual files and discussed this with the staff we interviewed. Through examination of the files and our discussions, we confirmed that systematic induction training was in place for new staff based on the nationally recognised “Skills for Care” framework. Other training included health and safety topics such as first aid, food hygiene and moving and handling. A staff member is qualified as a moving and handling trainer. Some staff had received training in dementia care and others were awaiting this training. The manager had circulated information form the Alzheimer’s Disease Society and had obtained training materials that were about to be used with staff. An ongoing programme was in place for training towards National Vocational Qualifications in care. In our discussions with staff it was evident that each was clear about their role and what it entailed. Davey Court DS0000039203.V378172.R01.S.doc Version 5.3 Page 20 Management and Administration The intended outcomes for Standards 31 – 38 are: 31. 32. 33. 34. 35. 36. 37. 38. Service users live in a home which is run and managed by a person who is fit to be in charge, of good character and able to discharge his or her responsibilities fully. Service users benefit from the ethos, leadership and management approach of the home. The home is run in the best interests of service users. Service users are safeguarded by the accounting and financial procedures of the home. Service users’ financial interests are safeguarded. Staff are appropriately supervised. Service users’ rights and best interests are safeguarded by the home’s record keeping, policies and procedures. The health, safety and welfare of service users and staff are promoted and protected. The Commission considers Standards 31, 33, 35 and 38 the key standards to be inspected. This is what people staying in this care home experience: JUDGEMENT – we looked at outcomes for the following standard(s): Standards 31, 33, 35 and 38 People using the service experience good quality outcomes in this area. We have made this judgement using a range of evidence, including a visit to this service. Davey Court is well managed for the benefit of people living there. EVIDENCE: Since our last visit to the home, Christine Cawse had been registered as manager with the Commission. Ms. Cawse has many years experience in care and holds the registered Managers Award and a National Vocational Qualification at level 4 in care. She had recently completed training in the Mental Capacity Act and Deprivation of Liberty Safeguards (DOLS). She told us that she is part of a managers group concerning DOLS. Davey Court DS0000039203.V378172.R01.S.doc Version 5.3 Page 21 In discussion she displayed a clear understanding of her management role. There were structures in place for the effective management of staff such as delegated responsibilities and meetings for different groups of staff. On the day of our visit, a planned Senior Carers meeting took place and we saw minutes of previous meetings. Regular individual supervision was recorded and staff confirmed that this was taking place. A Quality Assurance system was in place involving questionnaires being sent out to people living at the home. The responses from theses questionnaires were collated and a report had been produced. We saw that action had been taken in response to feedback from people living in the home. This included, for example, replacing blankets with duvets. There was also evidence of regular audits. For instance, this included the medication system, falls and health and safety. During our visits we saw evidence of regular visits to the home by the Responsible individual. These are required by regulation. The home holds only small amounts of cash for people living in the home and its policy prohibits staff from benefiting financially from the people living there. We looked at how the health and safety of people living and working in the home was promoted. In a recent health and safety audit the home had scored 95 . Records showed that staff had received training in health and safety topics and there was evidence of regular servicing of equipment such as the assisted bath, hoists and the passenger lift. In January 2009 we received information from the Fire and rescue Service that a notice had been served upon the home to improve its fire safety measures. Action was in hand at the time of our visit to comply with this notice within the timescale specified. Davey Court DS0000039203.V378172.R01.S.doc Version 5.3 Page 22 SCORING OF OUTCOMES This page summarises the assessment of the extent to which the National Minimum Standards for Care Homes for Older People have been met and uses the following scale. The scale ranges from: 4 Standard Exceeded 2 Standard Almost Met (Commendable) (Minor Shortfalls) 3 Standard Met 1 Standard Not Met (No Shortfalls) (Major Shortfalls) “X” in the standard met box denotes standard not assessed on this occasion “N/A” in the standard met box denotes standard not applicable CHOICE OF HOME Standard No Score 1 2 3 4 5 6 ENVIRONMENT Standard No Score 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 X X 3 X X N/A HEALTH AND PERSONAL CARE Standard No Score 7 3 8 3 9 3 10 3 11 X X DAILY LIFE AND SOCIAL ACTIVITIES Standard No Score 12 3 13 3 14 3 15 3 COMPLAINTS AND PROTECTION Standard No Score 16 3 17 X 18 3 3 X X X X X X 3 STAFFING Standard No Score 27 3 28 3 29 3 30 3 MANAGEMENT AND ADMINISTRATION Standard No 31 32 33 34 35 36 37 38 Score 3 X 3 X 3 X X 3 Davey Court DS0000039203.V378172.R01.S.doc Version 5.3 Page 23 Are there any outstanding requirements from the last inspection? No STATUTORY REQUIREMENTS This section sets out the actions, which must be taken so that the registered person/s meets the Care Standards Act 2000, Care Homes Regulations 2001 and the National Minimum Standards. The Registered Provider(s) must comply with the given timescales. No. Standard Regulation Requirement Timescale for action RECOMMENDATIONS These recommendations relate to National Minimum Standards and are seen as good practice for the Registered Provider/s to consider carrying out. No. 1. Refer to Standard OP12 Good Practice Recommendations The registered person should ensure that social activities are linked to the individual needs, interests and aspirations of individuals living in the home Davey Court DS0000039203.V378172.R01.S.doc Version 5.3 Page 24 Care Quality Commission Care Quality Commission South West Citygate Gallowgate Newcastle Upon Tyne NE1 4PA National Enquiry Line: Telephone: 03000 616161 Email: enquiries@cqc.org.uk Web: www.cqc.org.uk We want people to be able to access this information. If you would like a summary in a different format or language please contact our helpline or go to our website. Copyright © (2009) Care Quality Commission (CQC). This publication may be reproduced in whole or in part, free of charge, in any format or medium provided that it is not used for commercial gain. This consent is subject to the material being reproduced accurately and on proviso that it is not used in a derogatory manner or misleading context. The material should be acknowledged as CQC copyright, with the title and date of publication of the document specified. Davey Court DS0000039203.V378172.R01.S.doc Version 5.3 Page 25 - Please note that this information is included on www.bestcarehome.co.uk under license from the regulator. Re-publishing this information is in breach of the terms of use of that website. Discrete codes and changes have been inserted throughout the textual data shown on the site that will provide incontrovertable proof of copying in the event this information is re-published on other websites. The policy of www.bestcarehome.co.uk is to use all legal avenues to pursue such offenders, including recovery of costs. You have been warned!

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