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Care Home: Fessey House

  • Brookdene Haydon Wick Swindon Wiltshire SN25 1RY
  • Tel: 01793725844
  • Fax: 01793706104

Fessey House is a large care home owned and managed by Swindon Borough Council. It is located in a quiet cul de sac in the Haydon Wick area of Swindon. The local shops and a community centre are nearby. The home is on 2 floors and is sub divided into 4 living areas. Three of these living areas provide long term social care and accommodation. The other area provides respite and crisis care on a short term basis. Each living area has its own separate lounge and dining room with a kitchenette where drinks and snacks can be prepared. The main meals (typically lunch and tea) are cooked in a central kitchen. All bedrooms are single rooms and can be decorated to the occupant`s choice. Service users are encouraged to personalise their rooms and may bring their own furniture. Typically there are seven or eight care staff on duty plus a shift leader or manager. At night three care staff work in the home. Additionally the home deploys a housekeeper in the mornings at busy times in each living area as well as providing cleaning staff. Designated staff are employed to carry out administrative and cooking duties. If the home is short of permanent staff it relies on staff working extra hours or agency staff. Fees charged at Fessey house are £405 per week.

  • Latitude: 51.590000152588
    Longitude: -1.8109999895096
  • Manager: Mrs Emma Jones
  • Price p/w: £405
  • UK
  • Total Capacity: 43
  • Type: Care home only
  • Provider: Swindon Borough Council
  • Ownership: Local Authority
  • Care Home ID: 6447
Residents Needs:
Old age, not falling within any other category

Previous Inspections

This may not be the latest inspection for this service as we are having techinical problems updating from CQC - please check directly on the regulators website for the most recent report; bestcarehome hopes to be back to regular updates shortly.

For extracts, read the latest CQC inspection for Fessey House.

CARE HOMES FOR OLDER PEOPLE Fessey House Brookdene Haydon Wick Swindon Wiltshire SN25 1RY Lead Inspector Pauline Lintern Unannounced Inspection 4th November 2008 10:00 X10015.doc Version 1.40 Page 1 The Commission for Social Care Inspection aims to: • • • • Put the people who use social care first Improve services and stamp out bad practice Be an expert voice on social care Practise what we preach in our own organisation Reader Information Document Purpose Author Audience Further copies from Copyright Inspection Report CSCI General Public 0870 240 7535 (telephone order line) This report is copyright Commission for Social Care Inspection (CSCI) and may only be used in its entirety. Extracts may not be used or reproduced without the express permission of CSCI www.csci.org.uk Internet address Fessey House DS0000035422.V372926.R01.S.doc Version 5.2 Page 2 This is a report of an inspection to assess whether services are meeting the needs of people who use them. The legal basis for conducting inspections is the Care Standards Act 2000 and the relevant National Minimum Standards for this establishment are those for Care Homes for Older People. They can be found at www.dh.gov.uk or obtained from The Stationery Office (TSO) PO Box 29, St Crispins, Duke Street, Norwich, NR3 1GN. Tel: 0870 600 5522. Online ordering: www.tso.co.uk/bookshop This report is a public document. Extracts may not be used or reproduced without the prior permission of the Commission for Social Care Inspection. Fessey House DS0000035422.V372926.R01.S.doc Version 5.2 Page 3 SERVICE INFORMATION Name of service Fessey House Address Brookdene Haydon Wick Swindon Wiltshire SN25 1RY 01793 725844 01793 706104 EJones@swindon.gov.uk Telephone number Fax number Email address Provider Web address Name of registered provider(s)/company (if applicable) Name of registered manager (if applicable) Type of registration No. of places registered (if applicable) Swindon Borough Council Emma Jones Care Home 43 Category(ies) of Old age, not falling within any other category registration, with number (43) of places Fessey House DS0000035422.V372926.R01.S.doc Version 5.2 Page 4 SERVICE INFORMATION Conditions of registration: 1. The home may also admit not more than 2 adults at any one time who are aged over 55 years but under 65 years so long as these people are accommodated in the short term care unit and their period of stay does not exceed 8 consecutive weeks in any one care episode. 6th November 2007 Date of last inspection Brief Description of the Service: Fessey House is a large care home owned and managed by Swindon Borough Council. It is located in a quiet cul de sac in the Haydon Wick area of Swindon. The local shops and a community centre are nearby. The home is on 2 floors and is sub divided into 4 living areas. Three of these living areas provide long term social care and accommodation. The other area provides respite and crisis care on a short term basis. Each living area has its own separate lounge and dining room with a kitchenette where drinks and snacks can be prepared. The main meals (typically lunch and tea) are cooked in a central kitchen. All bedrooms are single rooms and can be decorated to the occupants choice. Service users are encouraged to personalise their rooms and may bring their own furniture. Typically there are seven or eight care staff on duty plus a shift leader or manager. At night three care staff work in the home. Additionally the home deploys a housekeeper in the mornings at busy times in each living area as well as providing cleaning staff. Designated staff are employed to carry out administrative and cooking duties. If the home is short of permanent staff it relies on staff working extra hours or agency staff. Fees charged at Fessey house are £405 per week. Fessey House DS0000035422.V372926.R01.S.doc Version 5.2 Page 5 SUMMARY This is an overview of what the inspector found during the inspection. The quality rating for this service is 2 star. This means the people who use this service experience good quality outcomes. The unannounced inspection took place over seven hours. The manager, Mrs Emma Jones and the deputy manager, were available throughout the day to assist, where necessary. In January 2008, we completed a random inspection of this service to monitor progress made to date, with regard to requirements set at the previous inspection on 6/11/2007. We found that six of the seven requirements set had been complied with. We used an ‘expert by experience’ with this inspection. An ‘expert by experience’ is a person who, because of their shared experience of using services, and/or ways of communicating, visits a service with an inspector to help them get a picture of what it is like to live in or use the service. Our pharmacist inspector, who examined the homes’ arrangements for managing medication, also accompanied us. We had the opportunity to talk to people using the service and staff members in private, to obtain their views. As part of the inspection process, we sent surveys to the home for people to complete, if they wanted to. We also sent surveys, to be distributed by the home to staff, GPs and other health care professionals. Eight people using the service, four staff members and three healthcare professionals responded to our surveys. The feedback received, is reported upon within this report. An Annual Quality Assurance Assessment (AQAA) was sent to the home to complete as part of this inspection. This was completed and returned to us within the timescale set. It provided us with the information we requested. Various documents and records were examined in detail. These included care plans, risk assessments, health and safety records, quality assurance, complaints and staff recruitment and training. At the time of our inspection the crisis unit had been closed, ready for the long awaited refurbishment. We received positive comments from the people we spoke to regarding the service they receive from Fessey House. Fessey House DS0000035422.V372926.R01.S.doc Version 5.2 Page 6 Our ‘expert by experience’ concluded her report with the comment ‘I usually judge a home by whether I would put my mother in it or not. I would certainly use this home, it may be old and shabby but the care is very good and it comes from the heart’. What the service does well: What has improved since the last inspection? What they could do better: There is a statement of purpose and a service user guide in place, however it did not fully contain current information. Fessey House DS0000035422.V372926.R01.S.doc Version 5.2 Page 7 Risk assessments for specific conditions, such as diabetes, needs to be individual to the person and not a generic assessment. The assessment should be dated and signed by the person completing it. The fire risk assessment should be dated and signed. Please contact the provider for advice of actions taken in response to this inspection. The report of this inspection is available from enquiries@csci.gsi.gov.uk or by contacting your local CSCI office. The summary of this inspection report can be made available in other formats on request. Fessey House DS0000035422.V372926.R01.S.doc Version 5.2 Page 8 DETAILS OF INSPECTOR FINDINGS CONTENTS Choice of Home (Standards 1–6) Health and Personal Care (Standards 7-11) Daily Life and Social Activities (Standards 12-15) Complaints and Protection (Standards 16-18) Environment (Standards 19-26) Staffing (Standards 27-30) Management and Administration (Standards 31-38) Scoring of Outcomes Statutory Requirements Identified During the Inspection Fessey House DS0000035422.V372926.R01.S.doc Version 5.2 Page 9 Choice of Home The intended outcomes for Standards 1 – 6 are: 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. Prospective service users have the information they need to make an informed choice about where to live. Each service user has a written contract/ statement of terms and conditions with the home. No service user moves into the home without having had his/her needs assessed and been assured that these will be met. Service users and their representatives know that the home they enter will meet their needs. Prospective service users and their relatives and friends have an opportunity to visit and assess the quality, facilities and suitability of the home. Service users assessed and referred solely for intermediate care are helped to maximise their independence and return home. The Commission considers Standards 3 and 6 the key standards to be inspected. JUDGEMENT – we looked at outcomes for the following standard(s): NMS 1and 3. Standard 6 was not reviewed at this visit. Quality in this outcome area is good. This judgement has been made using available evidence including a visit to this service. People receive a full assessment of their needs before being offered a place at Fessey House. People are provided with information about the service before their admission, to enable them to decide if it is the right place for them. EVIDENCE: People who are considering moving into Fessey House, receive a full assessment to ensure that their needs can be met by the home. Once the assessment has been completed and it is agreed that the home can provide a suitable service, it is then confirmed in writing to the prospective new person. Assessments are kept under review by the funding authority. Assessments consider peoples’ personal history, spiritual needs, physical needs, interests and social needs, personal care needs, medical needs, mobility and phsycological needs. Fessey House DS0000035422.V372926.R01.S.doc Version 5.2 Page 10 Within our surveys, we asked if people had received a contract. Four people said,yes, three said no and one person could not remember. One person commented, ‘I came to Fessey House as a crisis person, as my wife had a fall’ We also asked if people were provided with enough information about the home so they could decide if it was the right place for them. Four people said yes, three said no. One person commented: ‘None, I just turned up and I enjoy it every day’. The home has a statement of purpose and a service user guide. However it was noted that some of the contact information was not up to date. The deputy reported, that if either document is required in a different language or format, this could be provided by the home. Within their report, the ‘expert by experience’ stated, ‘The crisis unit has been closed ready for the long awaited refurbishment and I spoke to one service user that had only just arrived for the crisis unit. She was very happy with her care and thought the staff were wonderful. She ‘fitted in instantly’ and was made to feel very welcome’. Within the AQAA it states: ‘We have recently set up a buddy system where we allocate a service user already living at the home who could befriend the new service user. This helps to share experiences of how they find the home and activities they engage in’. Fessey House DS0000035422.V372926.R01.S.doc Version 5.2 Page 11 Health and Personal Care The intended outcomes for Standards 7 – 11 are: 7. 8. 9. 10. 11. The service user’s health, personal and social care needs are set out in an individual plan of care. Service users’ health care needs are fully met. Service users, where appropriate, are responsible for their own medication, and are protected by the home’s policies and procedures for dealing with medicines. Service users feel they are treated with respect and their right to privacy is upheld. Service users are assured that at the time of their death, staff will treat them and their family with care, sensitivity and respect. The Commission considers Standards 7, 8, 9 and 10 the key standards to be inspected. JUDGEMENT – we looked at outcomes for the following standard(s): NMS 7, 8, 9 and 10 Quality in this outcome area is good. This judgement has been made using available evidence including a visit to this service. Care plans reflect peoples’ assessed needs and are kept under review. This ensures any changes are identified and people’s health care needs are met. People are supported to manage their own medicines if they wish and all are protected by the home’s procedures for the safe handling of medicines. People told us that they are treated respectfully and with dignity. EVIDENCE: Records show that where possible care plans are written with involvement from the person receiving the service or their relative or representative. Reviews take place with attendance of the person living at the home and any other interested parties, including the key worker. As part of the inspection process, we examined three care plans in detail. Care plans are signed, when agreed, by both the person receiving the care and the key worker. The key worker reviews care plans and manual handling assessments monthly. Areas where a person may be at potential risk are Fessey House DS0000035422.V372926.R01.S.doc Version 5.2 Page 12 identified, such as skin integrity, nutrition and mobility. A risk assessment is completed and informs the reader how to minimise potential risks. Records show that people’s weight is monitored and recorded, to ensure that a healthy weight is maintained. Within our surveys healthcare professionals were asked, does the care service seek advice and act upon it to manage and improve individuals’ health care needs and, are individuals’ health care needs met by the care service? Both answered ‘always’ to both questions. People using the service have access to healthcare professionals including GP, optician, podiatrist and regular visits from the district nurse. One person, who is a diabetic, has a care plan, which clearly details parameters and symptoms that staff need to be aware of. Risks relating to this condition are also recorded in bright coloured text to ensure that it is identified as being important. There is also a separate ‘diabetic risk assessment’ in place. However, it was noted that this was a generic form, which did not have the person’s name on it, nor was it dated or signed by the person completing it. Our Pharmacist Inspector looked at arrangements for the handling of medicines. The home has an ongoing process of improvements in the way they manage medication. This was shown by the changes they have made to the recording of creams and lotions and the training that the carers undertake. They have also implemented recent guidance on the recording of warfarin doses. Since the last inspection they have changed their supplying pharmacy. Some people in the home want to manage some or all of their medicines themselves and they are well supported to do this. Staff do careful risk assessments and record clearly how much of their medication people wish to manage alone. All medication is stored securely, including a controlled drugs cupboard that complies with recent legislation. However to ensure its security, different bolts are needed to attach the cupboard securely to the wall. The controlled drug cupboard also contained other items that should not be stored there. The deputy manager advised us that the required bolts had been fitted to the controlled drugs cupboard by the end of the inspection. Care staff kept all the appropriate records, which were regularly audited by senior staff. Where the pharmacy had been unable to supply a particular medicine, staff had informed the GP immediately and taken his advice as to how best to support his patient. This information had been clearly documented. Medication was seen to be administered in a safe and sensitive manner. Fessey House DS0000035422.V372926.R01.S.doc Version 5.2 Page 13 Care plans contain information, on how the person living at the home communicates and may express him/herself. One plan sampled stated ‘X’s inability to express his needs could affect his rights, choices and dignity’. People’s daily routines are recorded and take into account their likes and dislikes. One care plan states, that the person needs assistance to wash their back but is able to wash independently. It also records that they like to have their hair washed on a Wednesday each week. Another plan informs that the person likes to have their hair done weekly, likes their bed linen changed once a week and wishes to remain independent. In our surveys, people using the service commented; ‘I am looked after very well’ and ‘I am happy and well looked after’. One person told us ‘I am keeping well. I have no problems with staff, we have our differences but they respect us, we get away with murder really’. During our visit staff members were observed spending time with the people living there, chatting and joking. There was a friendly feel to the home. Within our ‘expert by experience’s’ report it states, ‘I spoke to various service users and their visitors. All the service users I spoke to told me they were treated with dignity and care. Two visitors were visiting their parents and both thought very highly of the home and thought their parents were looked after very well. One comment was ‘although the home is somewhat shabby – there is a lot of love and care. All the doors to the service users rooms were closed and the carers knocked before entering’. Fessey House DS0000035422.V372926.R01.S.doc Version 5.2 Page 14 Daily Life and Social Activities The intended outcomes for Standards 12 - 15 are: 12. 13. 14. 15. Service users find the lifestyle experienced in the home matches their expectations and preferences, and satisfies their social, cultural, religious and recreational interests and needs. Service users maintain contact with family/ friends/ representatives and the local community as they wish. Service users are helped to exercise choice and control over their lives. Service users receive a wholesome appealing balanced diet in pleasing surroundings at times convenient to them. The Commission considers all of the above key standards to be inspected. JUDGEMENT – we looked at outcomes for the following standard(s): NMS 12, 13, 14 and 15 Quality in this outcome area is good. This judgement has been made using available evidence including a visit to this service. People living at Fessey House have the opportunity to participate in various activities, if they wish to do so. Friends and family are welcome at the home. People told us that they enjoy the meals provided by the home. EVIDENCE: The staff at Fessey House are committed to ensuring that there are regular activities for people to participate in, if they wish. There are photographs and examples of arts and crafts on the notice board for visitors to see. There is a well-equipped activities room, which is used daily. We asked our ‘expert by experience’ to explore social opportunities, which are made available to the people living at the home. Their comments included, ‘The lounges upstairs were not in use but there was a lot going on downstairs. The lounges are spilt so service users can choose to sit quietly or watch the TV or they can listen to music. One member of staff was playing the piano and running an ‘impromptu’ concert and the service users were singing before lunch. One lady with dementia ‘came alive’ when the singing started. Percussion instruments were handed out and a great time was had by all. Fessey House DS0000035422.V372926.R01.S.doc Version 5.2 Page 15 Two ladies were having their hair done upstairs and enjoying the experience. All the residents looked clean and very tidy. One of the carers had earlier been giving manicures to some of the ladies and some very nice polished nails were to be seen. I met X who is a carer but also takes on the role of activities coordinator. Everyday there is an activity and it is logged in a Quality Assurance file - what they do and who takes part, if one service user is not taking part in the activities the activities co-ordinator tries to find out what that particular service user would like to take part in.’ A file has been made with all the activities and pictures of outings month by month. Photos of a meal were included. There were examples of people’s work i.e. cards and dream catchers. Also inside the file were questionnaires from family and service users. The carers often get the file out and discuss the previous months’ activities with service users and they ‘relive’ the experiences. The activities co-ordinator came in on her day off to meet with us. She told us about activities in relation to Bonfire Night and the Remembrance Day Sunday service. Poppies had been made earlier in the week and a wreath. The activities person told us there is a church service once a month for the service users if they chose to attend. Outside the dining room is a small shop where people living at the home can buy sweets, tissues and toiletries. Some of the people using the service are able to cook with supervision. For Ascot week they made scones. Each person has a birthday cake made for them. One lady is looking forward to icing a Christmas cake that the cook is to make’. When we met with the cook, she was busy arranging the Christmas menu. She had spoken to each individual to ask what he or she would like to eat over the Christmas period. Everyone had chosen a traditional Christmas lunch, with drinks such as sherry, white wine and snowball, with a cherry. The cook added that there would be homemade Christmas pudding. There are plans for a Christmas party with school children coming in to sing Carols. Within our surveys to the people who use the service we asked, are there activities arranged by the home that you can take part in? Eight people answered ‘always’. One person commented, ‘ you don’t have to take part if you don’t feel like it, I find it fun.’ Another person added, ‘I enjoy people so I enjoy what they do for us.’ Family and friends are encouraged to visit the home. There is plenty of space where people can meet in privacy, if they wish and there are facilities for Fessey House DS0000035422.V372926.R01.S.doc Version 5.2 Page 16 making refreshments. One lady now corresponds with a sister in America with the help of her carer. The cook and her team appear to have a good relationship with people living at the home. There is plenty of interaction, which enables them to check that people are receiving food that they like. The daily menu selection is displayed on a notice board in the dining room. The cook told us that she would always pop to the shop to get anything that someone ‘fancies’ if it is not on the menu. As an example she told us about X being ‘off his food.’ She suggested that she prepare him egg and chips (as she knew this was a favourite of his) and he really enjoyed this. The cook has completed her Health and Hygiene course. Records held in the kitchen, show that fridge and freezer temperatures are regularly checked and recorded. Hot food is probed to ensure safe temperatures are being reached. Fessey House DS0000035422.V372926.R01.S.doc Version 5.2 Page 17 Complaints and Protection The intended outcomes for Standards 16 - 18 are: 16. 17. 18. Service users and their relatives and friends are confident that their complaints will be listened to, taken seriously and acted upon. Service users’ legal rights are protected. Service users are protected from abuse. The Commission considers Standards 16 and 18 the key standards to be. JUDGEMENT – we looked at outcomes for the following standard(s): NMS 16, 17 and 18 Quality in this outcome area is good. This judgement has been made using available evidence including a visit to this service. The majority of people told us, that they knew how to make a complaint or raise a concern if they needed to. Policies and Procedures are in place to safeguard the people using the service. EVIDENCE: Our ‘expert by experience’ reported, ‘every service user I spoke to, was aware of how they could complain, most service users thought they could vote if they wanted to’. Within our surveys four people living at the home confirmed that they knew who to speak to if they were not happy. Three people said they ‘usually’ knew who to speak to. Comments received were ‘X was unsure as she has never been in a situation where she had to speak to anybody because she is happy’, ‘do not have to make a complaint very often and they always deal with it at once’ and ‘what complaints?’ A copy of the home’s complaints procedure and a complaints form is available in the entrance hall of the home. There is a complaints log, to record any concerns raised. Fessey House DS0000035422.V372926.R01.S.doc Version 5.2 Page 18 Within the AQAA it states, ‘The home has received more compliments in the last 12 months. This is a reflection of the team work and encouragement in place from senior management’. The AQAA states, there have been three complaints made in the last twelve months. Two were resolved within 28 days and the one remains without a final outcome. Within the last twelve months, there have been two safeguarding referrals made. There has been one referral to the Protection of Vulnerable Adults (POVA) list. Records demonstrate that the home has followed the local ‘No Secrets’ guidance, when making a safeguarding referral. Within the AQAA it states, ‘In this policy (complaints), the whistle blowing policy and no secrets policy is mentioned and where needed we would go through this in more detail with the individuals. Legal or family representation would be available at the service users request. We also have a close working relationship with the Vulnerable adults team and make referals when needed directly to them’. Staff members we met with, confirmed that they have attended safeguarding training and had a understanding of the whistle blowing policy. One member of staff told us, ‘I think people are happy here, I’m proud to say that I work at Fessey’. Fessey House DS0000035422.V372926.R01.S.doc Version 5.2 Page 19 Environment The intended outcomes for Standards 19 – 26 are: 19. 20. 21. 22. 23. 24. 25. 26. Service users live in a safe, well-maintained environment. Service users have access to safe and comfortable indoor and outdoor communal facilities. Service users have sufficient and suitable lavatories and washing facilities. Service users have the specialist equipment they require to maximise their independence. Service users’ own rooms suit their needs. Service users live in safe, comfortable bedrooms with their own possessions around them. Service users live in safe, comfortable surroundings. The home is clean, pleasant and hygienic. The Commission considers Standards 19 and 26 the key standards to be inspected. JUDGEMENT – we looked at outcomes for the following standard(s): NMS 19 and 26 Quality in this outcome area is adequate. This judgement has been made using available evidence including a visit to this service. Fessey House remains a safe and homely environment yet many areas of the home are in need of updating and brightening up. EVIDENCE: As part of the inspection process we toured the building, looking at bedrooms, bathrooms, toilets and communal areas. As identified at previous inspections, the home is greatly in need of refurbishment. Many areas are in need of decoration. Lighting in certain areas is poor. The manager told us that the refurbishment is scheduled to commence before December 2008. As mentioned earlier in the report, the crisis unit is currently closed as it is to be fitted with new carpet and will be redecorated. There are plans that after Fessey House DS0000035422.V372926.R01.S.doc Version 5.2 Page 20 the refurbishment has taken place, there will be four, eight bedded ‘units’. Staff members will work across all units on a rota system. Within our ‘expert by experience’s’ report it stated ‘from the outside the home did not look very welcoming. Inside the front door everything was very old fashioned but homely. We were warmly welcomed by X (Deputy Manger) and the register was signed. My first impressions were of an unpleasant smell but as the day wore on I was not aware of this. I visited some of the service users in their rooms – one gentleman was having a lie-in as he had a bad day the day before. By lunchtime he was up and about and chirpy. All the doors to the service users rooms were closed and the carers knocked before entering. The service users are able to have their own furniture, pictures and ‘knickknacks’ in their rooms. The rooms were not spotless but the carpets etc were old, the service users tend to eat biscuits and crumbs were around ……… but they looked homely. The dining room was spacious and light; each table had a green tablecloth, silk flowers and glasses. The food looked very appetizing. There was a choice of two menus, if the service user did not fancy what was on the menu the cook went out of her way to provide an alternative. Service users were also able to eat in their room if they did not feel up to getting to the dining room’. The home employs three housekeepers in the morning and one in the afternoon. There is a person who carries out laundry tasks and is employed Monday to Friday. During the weekend the care staff take responsibility for the laundry. The laundry has two new industrial washing machines, with sluice facilities and a large dryer, which is to be re-sited. There is new flooring in the laundry area. Within their report, the ‘expert by experience’ stated, ‘I decided to speak to some of the newer service users to find out what they thought about the home. I spoke to a lady who told me that she was extremely happy, her laundry was done on time and came back perfect there was never any mix ups with clothes. Whatever she asked for she got straight away, the food was excellent – she had been in the home about two months and everything was ‘very lovely’. There is a handy man, who carries out small maintenance jobs and some health and safety checks. Within the AQAA it states, ‘we have a dedicated handy person who works within the home. This person carries out all water checks and deals with day to day manitenance of the home. If there are any issues that require specialist people he will report this or another staff member in his absence’. Within our surveys we asked, ‘is the home fresh and clean?’ Six people said ‘always’ and two said ‘usually’. One person commented, ‘I feel the housekeeping is not always thorough enough e.g. polishing’. Fessey House DS0000035422.V372926.R01.S.doc Version 5.2 Page 21 Protective clothing and anti bacterial hand wash is available throughout the building. Fessey House DS0000035422.V372926.R01.S.doc Version 5.2 Page 22 Staffing The intended outcomes for Standards 27 – 30 are: 27. 28. 29. 30. Service users’ needs are met by the numbers and skill mix of staff. Service users are in safe hands at all times. Service users are supported and protected by the home’s recruitment policy and practices. Staff are trained and competent to do their jobs. The Commission consider all the above are key standards to be inspected. JUDGEMENT – we looked at outcomes for the following standard(s): NMS 27, 28, 29 and 30 Quality in this outcome area is good. This judgement has been made using available evidence including a visit to this service. People told us that there is sufficient staff on duty to enable their needs to be met. Recruitment policies and procedures safeguard the people using the service. Staff receive regular training to ensure that they are competent to carry out their duties. EVIDENCE: The manager reported that due to the crisis unit currently being closed there was plenty of staff on duty. The ‘expert by experience’ noted in their report, ‘because the Crisis unit is closed there were many staff about and all of them were interacting with the service users’. The deputy manager confirmed that there is usually seven staff on duty in the morning, seven in the afternoon and three waking night staff. Within our surveys we asked, is staff available when you need them? Five people said ‘always’ and two said ‘usually’. Comments included: ‘The staff are very busy people and you only approach them if you need to, I find they are very good to us’ and ‘usually, due to sometimes being busy’. Eight out of eight people, confirmed in their surveys, that staff listen and act on what they say to them. Fessey House DS0000035422.V372926.R01.S.doc Version 5.2 Page 23 As part of the inspection process, we sampled the recruitment records of three members of staff. Records demonstrated that staff are recruited, inducted and trained properly. Checks had been carried out with the Criminal Records Bureau (CRB) and with the Protection of Vulnerable Adults (POVA) list, to ensure people are suitable to work with vulnerable people. We met with two members of staff, to obtain their views on the service being provided. One person told us ‘I treat people the way I would like my mum to be treated, I go the extra mile, I love my work’. Another person commented, ‘everything is fine, I really enjoy it here’. New staff members complete the Common Induction Standards, during their first months of employment. Evidence shows that staff receive training in mandatory subjects such as manual handling, fire awareness, health and safety, abuse awareness, basic food hygiene and emergency first aid. Training is also available in Data protection, equality, report writing, dementia and death, dying and bereavement. Staff told us that if they felt that they needed specific training in a subject they would only have to ask. Training has been arranged for November 2008 re: falls. All staff are due to attend. The deputy manager told us that all staff members have a National Vocational Qualification (NVQ) level 2 and most have achieved level 3. The deputy manager has now achieved her NVQ level 4 and is about to commence her Registered Managers Award. Fessey House DS0000035422.V372926.R01.S.doc Version 5.2 Page 24 Management and Administration The intended outcomes for Standards 31 – 38 are: 31. 32. 33. 34. 35. 36. 37. 38. Service users live in a home which is run and managed by a person who is fit to be in charge, of good character and able to discharge his or her responsibilities fully. Service users benefit from the ethos, leadership and management approach of the home. The home is run in the best interests of service users. Service users are safeguarded by the accounting and financial procedures of the home. Service users’ financial interests are safeguarded. Staff are appropriately supervised. Service users’ rights and best interests are safeguarded by the home’s record keeping, policies and procedures. The health, safety and welfare of service users and staff are promoted and protected. The Commission considers Standards 31, 33, 35 and 38 the key standards to be inspected. JUDGEMENT – we looked at outcomes for the following standard(s): NMS 31, 33, 35, 36 and 38 Quality in this outcome area is good. This judgement has been made using available evidence including a visit to this service. The home is run in the best interests of the people living there, by a competent and qualified manager. Policies and procedures are in place to safeguard the people living at the home. Quality assurance is monitored. EVIDENCE: Mrs Jones is the registered manager of Fessey House. She has recently, successfully passed her ‘fit person’ interview with CSCI. Mrs Jones appears committed to ensuring the wellbeing of the people living at the home. The deputy manager is experienced and competent in her role and offers good support to Mrs Jones. Fessey House DS0000035422.V372926.R01.S.doc Version 5.2 Page 25 People we spoke to, told us that they have found the manager approachable and supportive. One person using the service commented, ‘the new manager is brilliant, she will sort things out’. We examined the financial records of two people living at the home. Records and cash held by the home balanced in both cases. At the previous inspection not all senior staff were ensuring that they provided staff with regular supervision. We noted that this is an area where there has been an improvement. Records demonstrated that staff are now receiving regular supervision. Staff members confirmed, that they are regularly supervised by their line manager and also attend regular team meetings. The last team meeting took place on 29/8/2008. Following our last inspection an improvement plan was forwarded to CSCI. This detailed what actions had been taken to date, in order to meet the requirements we identified. Quality assurance surveys are sent out to relatives and the people using the service quarterly. We sampled the responses received from the people being supported and their comments were generally positive. It was noted that within the relatives’ surveys, it showed that not everyone knew how to make a complaint or raise a concern. The deputy manager, who followed up with a letter, addressed this by including a copy of the complaints procedure. The home has developed internal systems for auditing the service. These are completed daily, weekly and monthly to ensure all areas of the service are covered. In addition to this, monthly management visits take place. The home has a Health and safety policy in place. Hot water temperatures are regularly checked and recorded by the home’s maintenance person. Records demonstrate that the arrangements for managing fire checks and training are up to date. The home has a fire risk assessment in place, however this needs to be dated and signed by the person who completed it. Environmental risk assessments have been completed. Small portable electrical appliances were checked in May 2008. All radiators are guarded to safeguard people living at the home. Fessey House DS0000035422.V372926.R01.S.doc Version 5.2 Page 26 SCORING OF OUTCOMES This page summarises the assessment of the extent to which the National Minimum Standards for Care Homes for Older People have been met and uses the following scale. The scale ranges from: 4 Standard Exceeded 2 Standard Almost Met (Commendable) (Minor Shortfalls) 3 Standard Met 1 Standard Not Met (No Shortfalls) (Major Shortfalls) “X” in the standard met box denotes standard not assessed on this occasion “N/A” in the standard met box denotes standard not applicable CHOICE OF HOME Standard No Score 1 2 3 4 5 6 ENVIRONMENT Standard No Score 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 3 X 3 X X X HEALTH AND PERSONAL CARE Standard No Score 7 3 8 3 9 3 10 3 11 X DAILY LIFE AND SOCIAL ACTIVITIES Standard No Score 12 3 13 3 14 3 15 3 COMPLAINTS AND PROTECTION Standard No Score 16 3 17 3 18 3 2 X X X X X X 3 STAFFING Standard No Score 27 3 28 3 29 3 30 3 MANAGEMENT AND ADMINISTRATION Standard No 31 32 33 34 35 36 37 38 Score 3 X 3 X 3 3 X 3 Fessey House DS0000035422.V372926.R01.S.doc Version 5.2 Page 27 Are there any outstanding requirements from the last inspection? NO STATUTORY REQUIREMENTS This section sets out the actions, which must be taken so that the registered person/s meets the Care Standards Act 2000, Care Homes Regulations 2001 and the National Minimum Standards. The Registered Provider(s) must comply with the given timescales. No. 1. Standard OP9 Regulation 13(2) Requirement The controlled drug cupboard must be secured to a solid wall by means of rag or rawl bolts to ensure it complies with current legislation. This cupboard must only contain medication specified as controlled drugs and no other items. Timescale for action 31/12/08 RECOMMENDATIONS These recommendations relate to National Minimum Standards and are seen as good practice for the Registered Provider/s to consider carrying out. No. 1. Refer to Standard OP7 Good Practice Recommendations Risk assessments relating to diabetes should be specific to the individual and not generic. Assessments should be dated and signed. The Service User Guide should contain current information. There should be adequate lighting throughout the building. This recommendation was identified at the last inspection and has not been addressed. DS0000035422.V372926.R01.S.doc Version 5.2 Page 28 2. 3. OP1 OP19 Fessey House 12. OP19 Parts of the home should be redecorated to ensure a pleasant environment for people. This recommendation was identified at the last inspection. Fessey House DS0000035422.V372926.R01.S.doc Version 5.2 Page 29 Commission for Social Care Inspection South West Colston 33 33 Colston Avenue Bristol BS1 4UA National Enquiry Line: Telephone: 0845 015 0120 or 0191 233 3323 Textphone: 0845 015 2255 or 0191 233 3588 Email: enquiries@csci.gsi.gov.uk Web: www.csci.org.uk © This report is copyright Commission for Social Care Inspection (CSCI) and may only be used in its entirety. Extracts may not be used or reproduced without the express permission of CSCI Fessey House DS0000035422.V372926.R01.S.doc Version 5.2 Page 30 - Please note that this information is included on www.bestcarehome.co.uk under license from the regulator. Re-publishing this information is in breach of the terms of use of that website. Discrete codes and changes have been inserted throughout the textual data shown on the site that will provide incontrovertable proof of copying in the event this information is re-published on other websites. The policy of www.bestcarehome.co.uk is to use all legal avenues to pursue such offenders, including recovery of costs. You have been warned!

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