Please wait

Care Home: Oak House

  • Chard Street Axminster Devon EX13 5EB
  • Tel: 0129733163
  • Fax: 0129733342

Oak House provides care and accommodation for up to 17 older people who have needs relating to old age and/or dementia. The house is a four-storey listed building, which has been converted for use as a care home. It is situated in the heart of Axminster, on the main road through Axminster and close to all amenities. A passenger lift and two staircases link all floors. The home has two lounges, one of which is divided into smaller seating areas. There is a dining room in the lower ground floor, a part of which sometimes doubles as a staff seating area. The home has a courtyard garden at the rear and limited parking at the front of the home. Information about this service, including CSCI reports, is available direct from the home. As at September 2007 the fees charged range from £300.00 to £795.50 (double room) per week. Additional charges apply for items and services such as transport, escort service for hospital services, newspapers and chiropody.

  • Latitude: 50.783000946045
    Longitude: -2.9969999790192
  • Manager: Mrs Angela Martha Christina Baker
  • Price p/w: £548
  • UK
  • Total Capacity: 17
  • Type: Care home only
  • Provider: Mr Howard Norman Dennis,Mrs Sarah Jane Mary Dennis,Mr David Malcolm Baker,Mrs Angela Martha Christin
  • Ownership: Private
  • Care Home ID: 11457
Residents Needs:
Dementia, Old age, not falling within any other category

Previous Inspections

This may not be the latest inspection for this service as we are having techinical problems updating from CQC - please check directly on the regulators website for the most recent report; bestcarehome hopes to be back to regular updates shortly.

For extracts, read the latest CQC inspection for Oak House.

CARE HOMES FOR OLDER PEOPLE Oak House Chard Street Axminster Devon EX13 5EB Lead Inspector Teresa Anderson Unannounced Inspection 15th January 2009 10:00 X10015.doc Version 1.40 Page 1 The Commission for Social Care Inspection aims to: • • • • Put the people who use social care first Improve services and stamp out bad practice Be an expert voice on social care Practise what we preach in our own organisation Reader Information Document Purpose Author Audience Further copies from Copyright Inspection Report CSCI General Public 0870 240 7535 (telephone order line) This report is copyright Commission for Social Care Inspection (CSCI) and may only be used in its entirety. Extracts may not be used or reproduced without the express permission of CSCI www.csci.org.uk Internet address Oak House DS0000057492.V373775.R01.S.doc Version 5.2 Page 2 This is a report of an inspection to assess whether services are meeting the needs of people who use them. The legal basis for conducting inspections is the Care Standards Act 2000 and the relevant National Minimum Standards for this establishment are those for Care Homes for Older People. They can be found at www.dh.gov.uk or obtained from The Stationery Office (TSO) PO Box 29, St Crispins, Duke Street, Norwich, NR3 1GN. Tel: 0870 600 5522. Online ordering: www.tso.co.uk/bookshop This report is a public document. Extracts may not be used or reproduced without the prior permission of the Commission for Social Care Inspection. Oak House DS0000057492.V373775.R01.S.doc Version 5.2 Page 3 SERVICE INFORMATION Name of service Oak House Address Chard Street Axminster Devon EX13 5EB Telephone number Fax number Email address Provider Web address Name of registered provider(s)/company (if applicable) Name of registered manager (if applicable) Type of registration No. of places registered (if applicable) 01297 33163 01297 33342 oakdash@aol.com oakdash@aol.com Mrs Angela Martha Christina Baker Mrs Sarah Jane Mary Dennis, Mr Howard Norman Dennis, Mr David Malcolm Baker Mrs Angela Martha Christina Baker Care Home 17 Category(ies) of Dementia - over 65 years of age (17), Old age, registration, with number not falling within any other category (17) of places Oak House DS0000057492.V373775.R01.S.doc Version 5.2 Page 4 SERVICE INFORMATION Conditions of registration: 1. If it is proposed to amend the Partnership Agreement in such a way that Mr David Malcolm Baker or Mr Howard Norman Dennis become actively involved in carrying on the care home or in its day to day management the partners will advise the Commission for Social Care Inspection in writing without delay. 24th September 2007 Date of last inspection Brief Description of the Service: Oak House provides care and accommodation for up to 17 older people who have needs relating to old age and/or dementia. The house is a four-storey listed building, which has been converted for use as a care home. It is situated in the heart of Axminster, on the main road through Axminster and close to all amenities. A passenger lift and two staircases link all floors. The home has two lounges, one of which is divided into smaller seating areas. There is a dining room in the lower ground floor, a part of which sometimes doubles as a staff seating area. The home has a courtyard garden at the rear and limited parking at the front of the home. Information about this service, including CSCI reports, is available direct from the home. As at September 2007 the fees charged range from £300.00 to £795.50 (double room) per week. Additional charges apply for items and services such as transport, escort service for hospital services, newspapers and chiropody. Oak House DS0000057492.V373775.R01.S.doc Version 5.2 Page 5 SUMMARY This is an overview of what the inspector found during the inspection. The quality rating for this service is 2 star. This means the people who use this service experience good quality outcomes. This unannounced inspection took place in addition to the normal programme of inspection. We did this because an Annual Service Review (an inspection which does not include a visit to the home) carried out in October did not give us all the information we needed to make a judgement about this home. In addition we received some concerns about the home in relation to the change in management arrangements and effects this is having. One inspector carried out the site visit to this home over one day. During that time we (the commission) looked closely at the care and services offered to three people as a way of judging people’s experiences and the standard of care and accommodation generally. Where possible we spoke with these people in depth. We also contacted health or social care professionals involved in their care. We looked at their care assessments and care plans closely, and spoke with staff about their knowledge and understanding of these plans. We looked at people’s bedrooms and we looked at the overall environment from their perspective. We also spoke with or observed approximately ten other people living here. We spoke with the manager, the owners, with carers and with kitchen and domestic staff. Some of the people living here have dementia and are unable to engage in the inspection process or have a conversation with us. We looked at how they were engaged and how staff interacted and engaged with them as a way of helping to gauge their wellbeing. We looked around the building at all communal and service areas and saw many of the bedrooms. We looked at records including medication, staffing, training, fire safety and recruitment. Prior to the visit to the home we sent surveys to 8 people who live here and 5 were returned and to health and social care staff and 2 were returned. Their feedback and comments are included in the report. In addition, and before we visited the home, the owners provided information about the management of the home and an assessment of what the home does well and what they plan to improve upon. Oak House DS0000057492.V373775.R01.S.doc Version 5.2 Page 6 What the service does well: What has improved since the last inspection? What they could do better: The home could further improve the planning, recording and review of care planning. Some changes to the way medicines are managed would make this even safer. How gloves are used to prevent the spread of infection should be reviewed and bathing water temperatures should be checked prior to immersing someone in this, and records of this should be kept. Oak House DS0000057492.V373775.R01.S.doc Version 5.2 Page 7 Please contact the provider for advice of actions taken in response to this inspection. The report of this inspection is available from enquiries@csci.gsi.gov.uk or by contacting your local CSCI office. The summary of this inspection report can be made available in other formats on request. Oak House DS0000057492.V373775.R01.S.doc Version 5.2 Page 8 DETAILS OF INSPECTOR FINDINGS CONTENTS Choice of Home (Standards 1–6) Health and Personal Care (Standards 7-11) Daily Life and Social Activities (Standards 12-15) Complaints and Protection (Standards 16-18) Environment (Standards 19-26) Staffing (Standards 27-30) Management and Administration (Standards 31-38) Scoring of Outcomes Statutory Requirements Identified During the Inspection Oak House DS0000057492.V373775.R01.S.doc Version 5.2 Page 9 Choice of Home The intended outcomes for Standards 1 – 6 are: 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. Prospective service users have the information they need to make an informed choice about where to live. Each service user has a written contract/ statement of terms and conditions with the home. No service user moves into the home without having had his/her needs assessed and been assured that these will be met. Service users and their representatives know that the home they enter will meet their needs. Prospective service users and their relatives and friends have an opportunity to visit and assess the quality, facilities and suitability of the home. Service users assessed and referred solely for intermediate care are helped to maximise their independence and return home. The Commission considers Standards 3 and 6 the key standards to be inspected. JUDGEMENT – we looked at outcomes for the following standard(s): 3 Quality in this outcome area is good. People who come to live here can be assured that their needs will be assessed prior to them moving in to ensure the home can meet those needs. This judgement has been made using available evidence including a visit to this service. EVIDENCE: We looked at three care plans. We found that all contained records detailing the assessment of needs of each of these people. These are carried out by a senior member of staff and form the basis of the plan of care. Each follows a specific format and is written in enough detail to ensure that important needs are identified. Oak House DS0000057492.V373775.R01.S.doc Version 5.2 Page 10 Health and Personal Care The intended outcomes for Standards 7 – 11 are: 7. 8. 9. 10. 11. The service user’s health, personal and social care needs are set out in an individual plan of care. Service users’ health care needs are fully met. Service users, where appropriate, are responsible for their own medication, and are protected by the home’s policies and procedures for dealing with medicines. Service users feel they are treated with respect and their right to privacy is upheld. Service users are assured that at the time of their death, staff will treat them and their family with care, sensitivity and respect. The Commission considers Standards 7, 8, 9 and 10 the key standards to be inspected. JUDGEMENT – we looked at outcomes for the following standard(s): 7, 8, 9 and 10. Quality in this outcome area is good. People who live here have their privacy and dignity protected and their health and medication needs met. Care planning and recording could be further improved to help ensure consistently good care is given. This judgement has been made using available evidence including a visit to this service. EVIDENCE: In surveys the people who live here say that they always receive the medical support they need and when spoken with they say that staff call the doctor or nurse quickly when needed. Records in people’s care plans confirm this. In addition care plans demonstrate that people see allied health professionals such as the chiropodist, optician and dentist as needed. Healthcare professionals who visit the home say that staff responses to advice given and skills in meeting people’s needs are variable. We spoke with the Registered Manager about this. We were told that this had been recognised by Oak House DS0000057492.V373775.R01.S.doc Version 5.2 Page 11 the management team. In response to this they have employed another senior carer to ensure that each shift has a senior carer on duty who will take responsibility for ensuring peoples needs are met. The manager also told us that they had recognised that some staff need extra training in meeting people’s needs and are planning to start this shortly. We looked at three care plans which show that people have their needs assessed and that, in general, actions are taken in relation to preventing falls, pressure sores and malnutrition. However, we also found when we observed staff giving care and when we talked to some staff about the care they give, that the plans of care are not always followed. For example, one person is assessed as needing a hoist when being moved. We were told that some staff do not use this. Another care plan said that the person it belonged to preferred male carers. We spoke with staff about this and were told this person relates better to men in general and that if men give his care this usually results in less negative actions and/or behaviours that are difficult to manage. Records show that incidents where this person has shown aggression are in response to female carers giving personal care. Another care plans gives staff instructions about what to do if this persons blood sugar fall outside certain parameters. We found that this care plan had not been followed and there was not a written record of what actions had been taken or why. The manager reports that only one person living here has developed a small pressure sore. There is no plan of care for staff to follow to prevent this becoming worse and the care plan shows there was not a plan of care in place to help staff to prevent this. This care plan has not been reviewed since the sore was noted 4 days previously. The manager reports that as a small home with a small staff group that communication of needs is successfully achieved through verbal means. The above examples demonstrate that this is not the case. We looked at how medicines are managed and stored. We found that there are good ordering, storage and recording systems in place which staff follow. We looked at the records of some people receiving medicines and found these are up to date and accurate. We did note that some people have more tablets than records show they should have. This is because when receiving tablets into the home the amount of current stock is not added to the stock being received to give a running total. We also found that the keys for the medicine cupboard are kept on a larger bunch of keys. This means that when staff need a key they are given the whole bunch of keys, including the drug cupboard keys. We also found that one person is giving their own insulin. Staff say this person has been assessed as competent by health staff and are arranging to get the records to show this. In surveys healthcare professionals say that this service usually or sometimes respects peoples privacy and dignity. We observed staff interacting with people Oak House DS0000057492.V373775.R01.S.doc Version 5.2 Page 12 during this inspection and saw that staff have varying skills in this area. All staff gave personal care in private and everyone living here is dressed appropriately. One person needed support of a personal and potentially embarrassing nature and this was dealt with discreetly and sensitively. We also overheard and saw some interactions that were hurried or less than polite. We reported these issues to the manager. The manager reports that actions are being taken to address these differences that have already been identified. She reports a system has recently been introduced to improve the supervision of staff and this will be used to address these issues. In addition, the manager reports that senior staff have been instructed to deal with any issues they see at the time and with the member of staff concerned. Oak House DS0000057492.V373775.R01.S.doc Version 5.2 Page 13 Daily Life and Social Activities The intended outcomes for Standards 12 - 15 are: 12. 13. 14. 15. Service users find the lifestyle experienced in the home matches their expectations and preferences, and satisfies their social, cultural, religious and recreational interests and needs. Service users maintain contact with family/ friends/ representatives and the local community as they wish. Service users are helped to exercise choice and control over their lives. Service users receive a wholesome appealing balanced diet in pleasing surroundings at times convenient to them. The Commission considers all of the above key standards to be inspected. JUDGEMENT – we looked at outcomes for the following standard(s): 12, 13, 14 and 15. Quality in this outcome area is good. Improvements made are helping the people who live here to have their social care needs met. Support is offered in a way that promotes choice and flexibility. People benefit from a diet which is varied and nutritious and which they generally enjoy. This judgement has been made using available evidence including a visit to this service. EVIDENCE: This service provides a programme of activities that takes into account peoples preferences and abilities. For example arts and crafts, coffee mornings, cake baking and decorating, trips out and tabletop games. In surveys people say they usually or sometimes enjoy the activities. People living here currently say they like the music. Others were unable to tell us what they like. Oak House DS0000057492.V373775.R01.S.doc Version 5.2 Page 14 On the day of this inspection the weekly church service took place with a visiting minister, the TV’s in the two lounges were set to programmes that people seem to engage with and were turned off when not wanted. The activities programme was advertised in the hall. We saw some staff engaging with people living here by having conversations with them, talking to them as they passed them and generally respectfully passing the time with them. People who are able move around the home as they wish and choose where to sit for example. Areas that are potentially unsafe have restricted use using a keypad system. The manager reports that outings on the local ‘charabang’ have taken place and that a weekend away for some people proved very enjoyable and successful. In surveys the people who live here say that they usually or sometimes like the meals served at the home. We note that one cook has recently left and been replaced. People say that ‘things are beginning to settle down again’. They mean that the cook is getting used to their preferences. The menu shows that there is always a choice of what to eat at each meal and people say they can make special requests if they ‘fancy something different’. Jugs of juice are sited around the home so that staff can easily give drinks to people and hot drinks are frequently offered. Fresh fruit is available. Oak House DS0000057492.V373775.R01.S.doc Version 5.2 Page 15 Complaints and Protection The intended outcomes for Standards 16 - 18 are: 16. 17. 18. Service users and their relatives and friends are confident that their complaints will be listened to, taken seriously and acted upon. Service users’ legal rights are protected. Service users are protected from abuse. The Commission considers Standards 16 and 18 the key standards to be. JUDGEMENT – we looked at outcomes for the following standard(s): 16 and 18. Quality in this outcome area is good. People who live here have their complaints heard and acted upon. They are kept safe and are protected from harm. This judgement has been made using available evidence including a visit to this service. EVIDENCE: The commission has received two concerns about this service since the last inspection. One was referred to the owner to investigate. The concerns were found to be unfounded and no actions were taken. The home has a clear complaints policy that is in the guide to the home. In surveys people say they know who to make a complaint to, and many comment they had not need to do this. Some relatives comment that they have the private telephone number of the owners and the owners confirm this is given to all the relatives of the people living here. The care plan of each person living here contains a reminder for staff that people have the right to make complaints and that these should be taken seriously and investigated. People say that they feel safe and well cared for. One person said staff are always lovely. Staff have received training in ‘Safeguarding Adults’ and Oak House DS0000057492.V373775.R01.S.doc Version 5.2 Page 16 demonstrate a good knowledge of what abuse is and what to do if an allegation of abuse were made. Oak House DS0000057492.V373775.R01.S.doc Version 5.2 Page 17 Environment The intended outcomes for Standards 19 – 26 are: 19. 20. 21. 22. 23. 24. 25. 26. Service users live in a safe, well-maintained environment. Service users have access to safe and comfortable indoor and outdoor communal facilities. Service users have sufficient and suitable lavatories and washing facilities. Service users have the specialist equipment they require to maximise their independence. Service users’ own rooms suit their needs. Service users live in safe, comfortable bedrooms with their own possessions around them. Service users live in safe, comfortable surroundings. The home is clean, pleasant and hygienic. The Commission considers Standards 19 and 26 the key standards to be inspected. JUDGEMENT – we looked at outcomes for the following standard(s): 19 and 26. Quality in this outcome area is good. People living here enjoy their surroundings and improvements made in the home mean that it is safe. This judgement has been made using available evidence including a visit to this service. EVIDENCE: In surveys people say the home is always fresh and clean. One person wrote ‘this is a very nice home to live in’ and another ‘it is always nice and clean’. Since the last inspection bar soap has been replaced with liquid soap in all areas as a way of helping to prevent the spread of infection. Paper towels, gloves and aprons are easily available to all staff, and we saw them using these. We also saw that two members of staff did not remove their gloves after Oak House DS0000057492.V373775.R01.S.doc Version 5.2 Page 18 giving personal care. We discussed this with the manager who told us this had been noted by a senior member of staff and was being addressed. We looked at the laundry and saw it was clean and tidy, and organised. The programme of routine maintenance and refurbishment/redecoration has progressed and resulted in improved maintenance around the home. We saw that some bedrooms have been redecorated and that further redecoration is planned. The manager reports that they plan to make the bathrooms more homely and we saw that a walk in shower has been added since the last inspection. Devon Fire and Rescue Service have recently visited the home and the manager reports that the recommendations made have been addressed. Oak House DS0000057492.V373775.R01.S.doc Version 5.2 Page 19 Staffing The intended outcomes for Standards 27 – 30 are: 27. 28. 29. 30. Service users’ needs are met by the numbers and skill mix of staff. Service users are in safe hands at all times. Service users are supported and protected by the home’s recruitment policy and practices. Staff are trained and competent to do their jobs. The Commission consider all the above are key standards to be inspected. JUDGEMENT – we looked at outcomes for the following standard(s): 27, 28, 29 and 30. Quality in this outcome area is good. People are supported by well trained staff who are employed in sufficient numbers to meet their needs. Practice in relation to recruitment has improved meaning that people are better protected from being cared for by unsuitable staff. This judgement has been made using available evidence including a visit to this service. EVIDENCE: In surveys people, relatives and healthcare professionals say that some staff are better than others. The owners have recognised this and have put in place both staff and organisational changes as a way of addressing this. When spoken with people say that staff are kind and helpful and they don’t usually have to wait too long to get attention. The duty rota shows that each morning there is a senior carer/shift leader on duty together with three carers. In the afternoon there is a shift leader and two carers and at night either a senior carer with a carer, or two carers. During the week extra support is provided by two administrators, a cook, a cleaner and the manager has none care hours for three out of the five days she works. Oak House DS0000057492.V373775.R01.S.doc Version 5.2 Page 20 Staff report they have a good induction which meets their needs and that they are never asked to care for anyone outside their area of knowledge or expertise. The owners report that they have improved induction training by incorporating recommendations made by ‘Skills for Care’. Over 50 of staff have a National Vocational Qualification (NVQ) in care or are working towards this. In addition extra training is provided based on the needs of the people living here. This includes basic and advanced training in caring for people with dementia. Staff we spoke with demonstrate a good understanding of dementia and how to communicate with people with dementia. We looked at the recruitment files of two people working at the home. Both contain all the information that is recommended to help ensure that robust recruitment procedures help to protect people. This includes references, an application form detailing where the person has worked before and police checks. Oak House DS0000057492.V373775.R01.S.doc Version 5.2 Page 21 Management and Administration The intended outcomes for Standards 31 – 38 are: 31. 32. 33. 34. 35. 36. 37. 38. Service users live in a home which is run and managed by a person who is fit to be in charge, of good character and able to discharge his or her responsibilities fully. Service users benefit from the ethos, leadership and management approach of the home. The home is run in the best interests of service users. Service users are safeguarded by the accounting and financial procedures of the home. Service users’ financial interests are safeguarded. Staff are appropriately supervised. Service users’ rights and best interests are safeguarded by the home’s record keeping, policies and procedures. The health, safety and welfare of service users and staff are promoted and protected. The Commission considers Standards 31, 33, 35 and 38 the key standards to be inspected. JUDGEMENT – we looked at outcomes for the following standard(s): 31, 33, 35 and 38. Quality in this outcome area is good. People living here benefit from a home that is well managed, responsive to feedback and aims to improve safety and person centred care. This judgement has been made using available evidence including a visit to this service. EVIDENCE: The Registered Manager of this home is one of the owners, who also owns two other care homes. As a consequence she is not at this home on a day-to-day basis and has appointed a manager and senior carers. The manager and her Oak House DS0000057492.V373775.R01.S.doc Version 5.2 Page 22 deputy have recently enrolled on a relevant management course and the manager intends to apply to the commission to become the Registered Manager. Staff say there have been a lot of changes in the home but that things are beginning to settle down and that they work well with the managers and the owners. Staff say they are well supported and that they get good training. This training includes mandatory training in moving and handling people, fire training and infection control. People living here say they ‘like living here’ and they are’ happy here’. Established quality assurance systems are in place and include an annual satisfaction survey, residents and staff meetings. Good practices in relation to food and hygiene in the kitchen were observed. Records of fridge and freezer temperatures are kept and all areas appear clean. The owners report in the Annual Quality Assurance Assessement that the temperature of hot water is controlled by thermostatic valves in all sinks and in baths to prevent accidental scalding. We ran the hot water in some sinks and baths and found the water to be hot but not scalding. Staff report they always check the temperature of bathing water before bathing anyone but we could not find these records during this inspection. Money is not kept on behalf of the people who live here. Instead a credit/debit account is kept whereby monies spent on peoples behalf is recorded and receipts provided for the family/supporters to pay. The questionnaire completed by the owners prior to the site visit indicates that they have an understanding of what the home does well and what needs improving. Oak House DS0000057492.V373775.R01.S.doc Version 5.2 Page 23 SCORING OF OUTCOMES This page summarises the assessment of the extent to which the National Minimum Standards for Care Homes for Older People have been met and uses the following scale. The scale ranges from: 4 Standard Exceeded 2 Standard Almost Met (Commendable) (Minor Shortfalls) 3 Standard Met 1 Standard Not Met (No Shortfalls) (Major Shortfalls) “X” in the standard met box denotes standard not assessed on this occasion “N/A” in the standard met box denotes standard not applicable CHOICE OF HOME Standard No Score 1 2 3 4 5 6 ENVIRONMENT Standard No Score 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 x x 3 x x N/A HEALTH AND PERSONAL CARE Standard No Score 7 2 8 3 9 3 10 3 11 x DAILY LIFE AND SOCIAL ACTIVITIES Standard No Score 12 3 13 3 14 3 15 3 COMPLAINTS AND PROTECTION Standard No Score 16 3 17 x 18 3 3 x x x x x x 3 STAFFING Standard No Score 27 3 28 3 29 3 30 3 MANAGEMENT AND ADMINISTRATION Standard No 31 32 33 34 35 36 37 38 Score 3 x 3 x 3 x x 3 Oak House DS0000057492.V373775.R01.S.doc Version 5.2 Page 24 Are there any outstanding requirements from the last inspection? No STATUTORY REQUIREMENTS This section sets out the actions, which must be taken so that the registered person/s meets the Care Standards Act 2000, Care Homes Regulations 2001 and the National Minimum Standards. The Registered Provider(s) must comply with the given timescales. No. 1. Standard OP7 Regulation 15 (1) (2) Requirement Care plans must detail how peoples needs are to be met and must be reviewed using the information that is relevant to that person and their care. This will help to ensure that people receive the care planned and that it is appropriate to their needs. Where people are looking after any of their own medicines, an assessment of competence must be kept in the home. The keys to the medicines must be kept separately from all other keys so that it is clear who has had access to medicines. A record must be kept of all medicines kept in the home. This includes adding together newly received stock and existing stock so that there is total relating to each medicine. Timescale for action 31/03/09 2. OP9 13 (2) 28/02/09 Oak House DS0000057492.V373775.R01.S.doc Version 5.2 Page 25 RECOMMENDATIONS These recommendations relate to National Minimum Standards and are seen as good practice for the Registered Provider/s to consider carrying out. No. 1. 2. Refer to Standard OP26 OP38 Good Practice Recommendations Gloves should always be changed after giving personal care to each person to prevent the spread of infection. Bathing water temperatures should be checked before a person is immersed in the water, and records should be kept of this. Oak House DS0000057492.V373775.R01.S.doc Version 5.2 Page 26 Commission for Social Care Inspection South West Colston 33 33 Colston Avenue Bristol BS1 4UA National Enquiry Line: Telephone: 0845 015 0120 or 0191 233 3323 Textphone: 0845 015 2255 or 0191 233 3588 Email: enquiries@csci.gsi.gov.uk Web: www.csci.org.uk © This report is copyright Commission for Social Care Inspection (CSCI) and may only be used in its entirety. Extracts may not be used or reproduced without the express permission of CSCI Oak House DS0000057492.V373775.R01.S.doc Version 5.2 Page 27 - Please note that this information is included on www.bestcarehome.co.uk under license from the regulator. Re-publishing this information is in breach of the terms of use of that website. Discrete codes and changes have been inserted throughout the textual data shown on the site that will provide incontrovertable proof of copying in the event this information is re-published on other websites. The policy of www.bestcarehome.co.uk is to use all legal avenues to pursue such offenders, including recovery of costs. You have been warned!

The Provider has not yet updated their profile and added details of the services and facilities they offer. If you are the provider and would like to do this, please click the "Do you run this home" button under the Description tab.

The Provider has not yet updated their profile and added details of the services and facilities they offer. If you are the provider and would like to do this, please click the "Do you run this home" button under the Description tab.

Promote this care home

Click here for links and widgets to increase enquiries and referrals for this care home.

  • Widgets to embed inspection reports into your website
  • Formated links to this care home profile
  • Links to the latest inspection report
  • Widget to add iPaper version of SoP to your website