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Care Home: Pinhay House

  • Pinhay House Rousdon Lyme Regis Dorset DT7 3RQ
  • Tel: 01297445626
  • Fax: 01297445686

The Pinhay Partnership owns Pinhay House. It provides accommodation and personal care for up to 25 older people who may suffer from mild to moderate dementia. The home is unable to care for people with severe dementia, or people who may display aggressive or unsociable behaviour. The property is a large converted Grade II listed mansion house standing at the end of a long drive approximately 2 miles from Lyme Regis. Bedroom accommodation is situated on the ground and first floors. There is a stair lift to the first floor but there are then further steps that residents may have to negotiate. Rooms at the front of the house benefit from sea views and other rooms overlook the surrounding countryside. Pinhay House has a large entrance hall, lounge/dining room and various quiet sitting areas throughout. Many of the rooms retain interesting period features and are large, bright and airy. The home`s statement of purpose and service user guide is available at the home, which includes details about the philosophy of the home, a statement of terms and conditions and details about living at the home. This is made available to all potential residents before they make a decision about living at the home. A copy of the most recent inspection report is posted on a notice board in the entrance hall of the home. Information received from the home indicates that the current fees are £381£700 weekly. Services not included in this fee include hairdressing, chiropody, toiletries and personal shopping, incontinence aids, newspapers and some transport. General information about fees and fair terms of contracts can be accessed from the Office of Fair Trading web site at <<http://www.oft.gov.uk>>. Copies of the inspection report are available from the office.

  • Latitude: 50.715999603271
    Longitude: -2.9719998836517
  • Manager: Mrs Carole Jane Hodges
  • Price p/w: £541
  • UK
  • Total Capacity: 25
  • Type: Care home only
  • Provider: The Pinhay Partnership
  • Ownership: Private
  • Care Home ID: 12407
Residents Needs:
Dementia, Old age, not falling within any other category

Previous Inspections

This may not be the latest inspection for this service as we are having techinical problems updating from CQC - please check directly on the regulators website for the most recent report; bestcarehome hopes to be back to regular updates shortly.

For extracts, read the latest CQC inspection for Pinhay House.

CARE HOMES FOR OLDER PEOPLE Pinhay House Rousdon Lyme Regis Dorset DT7 3RQ Lead Inspector Michelle Oliver Unannounced Inspection 16th September 2008 09:30 X10015.doc Version 1.40 Page 1 The Commission for Social Care Inspection aims to: • • • • Put the people who use social care first Improve services and stamp out bad practice Be an expert voice on social care Practise what we preach in our own organisation Reader Information Document Purpose Author Audience Further copies from Copyright Inspection Report CSCI General Public 0870 240 7535 (telephone order line) This report is copyright Commission for Social Care Inspection (CSCI) and may only be used in its entirety. Extracts may not be used or reproduced without the express permission of CSCI www.csci.org.uk Internet address Pinhay House DS0000022010.V368623.R01.S.doc Version 5.2 Page 2 This is a report of an inspection to assess whether services are meeting the needs of people who use them. The legal basis for conducting inspections is the Care Standards Act 2000 and the relevant National Minimum Standards for this establishment are those for Care Homes for Older People. They can be found at www.dh.gov.uk or obtained from The Stationery Office (TSO) PO Box 29, St Crispins, Duke Street, Norwich, NR3 1GN. Tel: 0870 600 5522. Online ordering: www.tso.co.uk/bookshop This report is a public document. Extracts may not be used or reproduced without the prior permission of the Commission for Social Care Inspection. Pinhay House DS0000022010.V368623.R01.S.doc Version 5.2 Page 3 SERVICE INFORMATION Name of service Pinhay House Address Rousdon Lyme Regis Dorset DT7 3RQ Telephone number Fax number Email address Provider Web address Name of registered provider(s)/company (if applicable) Name of registered manager (if applicable) Type of registration No. of places registered (if applicable) 01297 445626 01297 445686 info@pinhayhouse.co.uk The Pinhay Partnership Mrs Carole Jane Hodges Care Home 25 Category(ies) of Dementia - over 65 years of age (25), Old age, registration, with number not falling within any other category (25) of places Pinhay House DS0000022010.V368623.R01.S.doc Version 5.2 Page 4 SERVICE INFORMATION Conditions of registration: Date of last inspection 21st September 2007 Brief Description of the Service: The Pinhay Partnership owns Pinhay House. It provides accommodation and personal care for up to 25 older people who may suffer from mild to moderate dementia. The home is unable to care for people with severe dementia, or people who may display aggressive or unsociable behaviour. The property is a large converted Grade II listed mansion house standing at the end of a long drive approximately 2 miles from Lyme Regis. Bedroom accommodation is situated on the ground and first floors. There is a stair lift to the first floor but there are then further steps that residents may have to negotiate. Rooms at the front of the house benefit from sea views and other rooms overlook the surrounding countryside. Pinhay House has a large entrance hall, lounge/dining room and various quiet sitting areas throughout. Many of the rooms retain interesting period features and are large, bright and airy. The home’s statement of purpose and service user guide is available at the home, which includes details about the philosophy of the home, a statement of terms and conditions and details about living at the home. This is made available to all potential residents before they make a decision about living at the home. A copy of the most recent inspection report is posted on a notice board in the entrance hall of the home. Information received from the home indicates that the current fees are £381£700 weekly. Services not included in this fee include hairdressing, chiropody, toiletries and personal shopping, incontinence aids, newspapers and some transport. General information about fees and fair terms of contracts can be accessed from the Office of Fair Trading web site at http:/www.oft.gov.uk . Copies of the inspection report are available from the office. Pinhay House DS0000022010.V368623.R01.S.doc Version 5.2 Page 5 SUMMARY This is an overview of what the inspector found during the inspection. The quality rating for this service is 2 star. This means that people who use this service experience good quality outcomes. One inspector who spent 7 hours at the home undertook this inspection. We spoke with people living there and staff and also spent time observing the care and attention given to people by staff. Prior to this inspection we sent surveys to 10 people living at the home, 6 staff and 4 health care professionals. Seven of those living at the home, 7 staff and 4 health care professionals completed the surveys and returned then to us expressing their views about the service provided at the home. Their comments and views have been included in this report and helped us to make a judgement about the service provided. To help us understand the experiences of people living at this home, we looked closely at the care planned and delivered to three people. Most people living at the home were seen or spoken with during the course of our visit and three people were spoken with in depth to hear about their experience of living at the home. We also spoke with 9 staff, including the manager, care and development coordinators and ancillary staff, individually. A tour of the premises was made and we inspected a number of records including assessments and care plans and records relating to medication, recruitment and health and safety. What the service does well: People living at this home were generally very happy with life at the home; one person told us, “This is a lovely place to live”, another said, “Couldn’t be better”. People spoke highly of the staff; we were told that staff were “respectful, friendly, kind and caring”. During our visit staff were attentive and friendly in their approach to people living at the home. We saw staff skilfully meet the needs of individuals and ensure that individuals were offered choices. Good information is available to people to help make a decision about whether this home would suite their needs. A good admissions process ensures that the home can meet people’s needs. Pinhay House DS0000022010.V368623.R01.S.doc Version 5.2 Page 6 People’s health care needs are well met and the home works with other professionals, such as GPs and nurse specialists to ensure people have access to the care they need. People can be assured that caring staff will respect their privacy and dignity and enable them to make choices within their daily lives. People were generally happy with activities provided and most felt their social needs were met. People spoke highly of the food served at the home, which is of good quality and nutritious. The home can cater for various diets. People feel confident that their complaints or concerns will be addressed. There are systems in place to ensure that people living at the home are protected from harm or abuse. The environment is clean, comfortable and safe. People were very happy with their accommodation. The home has sufficient aids and equipment to support the need of the people living there. Many people praised the staff team for their caring approach and attitude. The staff morale at the home is high and staff feel valued in their role and have a good sense of job satisfaction. Staff are well trained and professionals were confident that they had the skills to meet the needs of the people living there. Staff are recruited robustly to ensure that people are protected. The home is well managed, with systems in place to ensure that people ‘have their say’ about the development of the service. Overall, health and safety is well managed and people are safeguarded from harm. What has improved since the last inspection? The home informs people in writing that their health, welfare and social care can be met at Pinhay House needs. Assessments of risks associated with falling are undertaken for all living at the home. This means that peoples’ safety is protected at the home. All staff are aware of the procedures to be followed in the event of an allegation of abuse being made. This means that people living at the home are protected from suffering abuse or being put at risk of abuse A programme of fitting all fire doors with electronic closures has been completed since the last inspection and all staff have received training in the prevention of fire. A procedure for ensuring that creams are not used beyond their expiry date, once opened, has been developed and is being followed. The laundry floor is more easily cleanable, which prevents the spread of infection and maintains hygiene. Pinhay House DS0000022010.V368623.R01.S.doc Version 5.2 Page 7 The home now maintains staff rotas showing which staff are on duty at any time during the day or night. This is to ensure that sufficient staff are caring for people. What they could do better: Please contact the provider for advice of actions taken in response to this inspection. The report of this inspection is available from enquiries@csci.gsi.gov.uk or by contacting your local CSCI office. The summary of this inspection report can be made available in other formats on request. Pinhay House DS0000022010.V368623.R01.S.doc Version 5.2 Page 8 DETAILS OF INSPECTOR FINDINGS CONTENTS Choice of Home (Standards 1–6) Health and Personal Care (Standards 7-11) Daily Life and Social Activities (Standards 12-15) Complaints and Protection (Standards 16-18) Environment (Standards 19-26) Staffing (Standards 27-30) Management and Administration (Standards 31-38) Scoring of Outcomes Statutory Requirements Identified During the Inspection Pinhay House DS0000022010.V368623.R01.S.doc Version 5.2 Page 9 Choice of Home The intended outcomes for Standards 1 – 6 are: 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. Prospective service users have the information they need to make an informed choice about where to live. Each service user has a written contract/ statement of terms and conditions with the home. No service user moves into the home without having had his/her needs assessed and been assured that these will be met. Service users and their representatives know that the home they enter will meet their needs. Prospective service users and their relatives and friends have an opportunity to visit and assess the quality, facilities and suitability of the home. Service users assessed and referred solely for intermediate care are helped to maximise their independence and return home. The Commission considers Standards 3 and 6 the key standards to be inspected. JUDGEMENT – we looked at outcomes for the following standard(s): 3 & 6. Quality in this outcome area is good. The home provides clear, detailed information to people considering moving in. People can be confidant that they will receive the care and support they need if they do move into the home. This judgement has been made using available evidence including a visit to this service. EVIDENCE: During this inspection we looked at the admission records of three people, one of whom had moved into the home the previous day. We talked to them about how they chose the home, about the information that was shared, and about the discussions and agreements that were reached on the care they need. Not all were able to remember their admission clearly and generally their admission had organised by relatives Pinhay House DS0000022010.V368623.R01.S.doc Version 5.2 Page 10 We found that the manager had visited them to carry out an assessment of their health and social care needs and to give them information about Pinhay House. The assessment records showed that information had been gathered to form the basis of a plan of care. However, the information did not include individual strengths or how people may achieve positive outcomes that will maintain their independence and support them to lead their lives as they wish. This means that although care staff know what care a person needs they may not know how they wish to be looked after. Copies of comprehensive assessment and plans of care for people who are not privately funded and are admitted through care management are obtained. All prospective residents and/or their family or representatives are encouraged to visit the home, meet other people living there and have a meal if they choose before the decision is made to make it their home. All people living at the home who we spoke to, who were able to communicate, confirmed that the home had provided ample information about the home before they decided to make it their home and the home had lived up to their expectations. Seven people living at the home responded to questionnaires we sent prior to this inspection. All confirmed that they had been given enough information about the home before they decided to live there. Comments included “Came for an afternoon then a weeks stay, really liked it” and “Son decided it for us”. The home does not offer intermediate care. Pinhay House DS0000022010.V368623.R01.S.doc Version 5.2 Page 11 Health and Personal Care The intended outcomes for Standards 7 – 11 are: 7. 8. 9. 10. 11. The service user’s health, personal and social care needs are set out in an individual plan of care. Service users’ health care needs are fully met. Service users, where appropriate, are responsible for their own medication, and are protected by the home’s policies and procedures for dealing with medicines. Service users feel they are treated with respect and their right to privacy is upheld. Service users are assured that at the time of their death, staff will treat them and their family with care, sensitivity and respect. The Commission considers Standards 7, 8, 9 and 10 the key standards to be inspected. JUDGEMENT – we looked at outcomes for the following standard(s): 7, 8, 9 & 10. Quality in this outcome area is good. Care planning provides staff with the information they require to meet the needs of individuals in a safe and respectful manner, while promoting their dignity and independence. This judgement has been made using available evidence including a visit to this service. EVIDENCE: The home is continually working towards improvement and care plans continue to improve resulting in staff being well informed about individual needs and wishes of people living at Pinhay House. The manager has promoted the role of key workers at the home. This means that each person living at the home has one member of staff who gets to know them well and support them with personal tasks. This works towards meeting the homes’ ethos of maintaining person centred care for all those living at Pinhay House. Pinhay House DS0000022010.V368623.R01.S.doc Version 5.2 Page 12 During this inspection three peoples’ files were looked at in detail and all included detailed information to ensure that staff are aware of how to meet individual daily health and social care needs. We were told that plans are developed with people individually and relatives are involved with the person’s consent. Plans are based on an up to date assessment covering all aspects of their health welfare and social care needs and were informative, well written, clear and easy to understand. All staff said that they refer to the plans, which are kept in individual rooms. Staff who responded to questionnaires confirmed they are always or usually given up to date info about the people they care for. One care plan looked at included detailed information of how a person should be cared for, including maximising the person’s comfort and contentment and sensitive management of a medical condition. Another provided staff with information related to assisting a person to move including assessing their capabilities as depending on their abilities different aids were to be used. We saw no information to confirm that the care plans had been followed and that people’s care needs were being met. This means that people may be put at risk of not receiving consistent care in a manner they choose. We spoke to several people living at the home during this visit and all were satisfied with the care provided and confirmed they receive the medical support they need. One person told us “ I’ve improved mentally since being here, I don’t panic so much”. Staff maintain individual daily reports for all people living at the home. We looked at the daily reports for 5 people and they consisted mainly of a record of personal care, continence and rooms being tidied rather than the care delivered and the way people lived their lives. When information had been recorded about health needs this did not include details of what action had been taken. For instance one daily record we looked at included details of a person “didn’t seem very well had a sore throat and looking flushed”. The following day staff had recorded “ very croaky voice and unsteady on legs. Does not look well”. No information about how this had been managed had been recorded. We also saw an entry stating, “says [they] are frightened of the stairs”. This person needed to negotiate 5 steps to their room, but no information had been recorded about how this had been managed. Some entries in the daily report were statements of what staff had done for the person. For example, put on the commode, put on the bed for bed rest, Pinhay House DS0000022010.V368623.R01.S.doc Version 5.2 Page 13 taken back to bedroom, put safely into bed. There was no indication as to whether the person had been consulted and had made any choices. Assessment of potential risks to people living at the home is undertaken as part of the care planning process and kept under review. This includes the risks of falling and nutrition. Care plans are reviewed regularly and appropriate changes are made to reflect changing needs. Individuals, and relatives are encouraged and supported to be involved in this review. The home monitors peoples’ dental and optician checks and chiropodists are used according to people’s needs. Information relating to the involvement, and advice from health care professionals such as skin care specialists and nutritionists were included in peoples’ plans of care. This means that they benefit from the involvement of health care professionals to ensure that health care needs are met. The manager described a good relationship with health professionals such as district nurses, community psychiatric nurse, pharmacist and doctors. Questionnaires returned by health care professionals prior to this inspection agreed that the home always or usually meets, and seeks advice and acts upon it to improve, individuals’ health care needs. A community psychiatric nurse commented, “ Always keen to discuss the care they offer and readily take on board advice”, “Committed to a quality service and “good standards of care always maintained”. Other comments included “Pinhay is a very friendly family run home, giving the needs of individuals utmost care and attention. All staff are friendly, hardworking and conscientious!” and “Individual care plans with nearest relative involvement when capacity is an issue”. Medication is well managed at the home; records were accurate, up to date and indicated that it is appropriately administered. Details of any changes to a person’s medication are recorded in their plan of care. Staff who handle medicines have received training in the safe handling of medication. This means that people are kept safe by the homes management, storage and administration of medicines at the home. Pinhay House DS0000022010.V368623.R01.S.doc Version 5.2 Page 14 People felt that their privacy was respected and staff were seen to knock on doors and wait to be invited in before doing so and were also seen offering personal care in a discreet manner. Pinhay House DS0000022010.V368623.R01.S.doc Version 5.2 Page 15 Daily Life and Social Activities The intended outcomes for Standards 12 - 15 are: 12. 13. 14. 15. Service users find the lifestyle experienced in the home matches their expectations and preferences, and satisfies their social, cultural, religious and recreational interests and needs. Service users maintain contact with family/ friends/ representatives and the local community as they wish. Service users are helped to exercise choice and control over their lives. Service users receive a wholesome appealing balanced diet in pleasing surroundings at times convenient to them. The Commission considers all of the above key standards to be inspected. JUDGEMENT – we looked at outcomes for the following standard(s): 12, 13, 14 & 15. Quality in this outcome area is good. People living at the home are offered good choices in all aspects of daily living. Social activities are well managed. They provide daily variation and interest for individuals and create opportunities for increasing their independence. Meals are nutritious and balanced and provide individuals with choice and variety. This judgement has been made using available evidence including a visit to this service. EVIDENCE: All those spoken to during this inspection said that there is always something going on at the home that they can take part in if they wish and that their individual interests are also met. During this inspection we saw people being encouraged and supported to take part in gentle exercises, a group of people were enjoying decorating biscuits and those who did not wish to take part were chatting with staff, reading or listening to music and some people went outside for a stroll around the gardens. Pinhay House DS0000022010.V368623.R01.S.doc Version 5.2 Page 16 All people living at the home who responded to questionnaires agreed that there are “always or usually” activities that they could take part in at the home. One person commented that they would like table tennis to be introduced at the home. The home has recently developed and extended the Activity Team, by the addition of two members of staff who are employed in an activities/care role. This is to enhance the effectiveness of a Social Team that covers 10am- 6pm 5 days a week.One to one and group meetings are held to discuss any issues or suggestions people living at the home may have. We were told that people living at the home have requested more outings and returned questionnaires also confirmed this. The manager told us that they are organising a minibus operator’s license and minibus driver training, to enable the activities staff to arrange regular weekly trips. We were told that outings tend to be spontaneous. For instance, recently, people who wanted to, went to a local garden centre and enjoyed a cream tea and another time went to the seaside for an ice cream. We were also told that more arts and crafts and more comprehensive reminiscence therapy are to be introduced at the home. An activities of daily living planner is completed during a person’s first few weeks in the home. This includes personal choices in relation to entertainment and interests, spirituality, food and drink, clothes, bedtime, bath time, skin, teeth and nails, hair, history, mobility, and independence. This means that staff are provided with information that will ensure people living at the home are treated as individuals and are encouraged and supported to live their lives as they choose. We asked staff how they prevent people who prefer to stay in their room from the risk of social isolation. We were told that staff visit them frequently, talk to them about daily events, their interests and tell them what activities are taking place so that they may change their minds. During this inspection we saw care staff visiting people who preferred to spend time in their rooms to make sure they were comfortable and did not need anything. All rooms have a nurse call system, which means that people can call for staff when they wish. Several people spoke about how their relatives/ visitors are made to feel welcome at the home. Visitors are offered drinks and “are made to feel at home”. We looked at the visitors’ book and it was clear that many people received visitors and they came at different times of the day. Pinhay House DS0000022010.V368623.R01.S.doc Version 5.2 Page 17 People moving into Pinhay house are encouraged to bring personal possessions and small items of furniture with them to make their rooms feel homely and this is agreed before admission. All of the rooms seen during this inspection were personalised and people spoke about the pleasure having their own things around them gave them. We were told that items of furniture brought to the home ranged from double beds to 3 piece suites and the odd grandfather clock. Most of the people spoken to during this inspection said that the food served was very good. All people who responded to questionnaires agreed that they always enjoy meals served at the home. Recently, people who are vegetarians or prefer not to eat meat were consulted with so that their favourite vegetarian meals could be prepared and served at the home. People can choose to have their meals in the pleasant dining room, in the lounge or in their rooms if they wish. The meal served during the day of this inspection was well presented, hot and nutritious. A monthly communion service is held at the home for all those who wish to attend. We were told that the manager has recently made arrangements for a person to follow their religious beliefs, as they are the only person at the home holding those beliefs. Pinhay House DS0000022010.V368623.R01.S.doc Version 5.2 Page 18 Complaints and Protection The intended outcomes for Standards 16 - 18 are: 16. 17. 18. Service users and their relatives and friends are confident that their complaints will be listened to, taken seriously and acted upon. Service users’ legal rights are protected. Service users are protected from abuse. The Commission considers Standards 16 and 18 the key standards to be. JUDGEMENT – we looked at outcomes for the following standard(s): 16 & 18. Quality in this outcome area is good. The home has a clear and simple complaints procedure that ensures complaints are responded to promptly with satisfactory outcomes. Staff have a good knowledge and understanding of the forms of abuse thereby ensuring that people living at the home are protected. This judgement has been made using available evidence including a visit to this service. EVIDENCE: The home has a detailed, clear and simple complaints procedure, which is prominently displayed for all people living at the home, visitors and staff to see. The home has developed a system to maintain records of all complaints received and how they are managed. No complaints had been made to the home or to the CSCI since the last inspection. People living at the home that we spoke to during this inspection said that if they were unhappy about anything they would not hesitate to raise any matter at any time and were sure that it would be dealt with to their satisfaction. Staff said that if anyone made a complaint they would report it to either the manager or senior carer. If it was something that they were able to sort out Pinhay House DS0000022010.V368623.R01.S.doc Version 5.2 Page 19 themselves then they would. They were confident that no issue that was raised would ever be ignored. There was nothing to suggest that people living at the home are anything other than well cared for. People spoken to told us that staff were very helpful, respectful and that nothing was ever too much trouble for them. The manager told us that all staff have received training in Adult Protection issues. A procedure for responding to abuse is available and staff were aware of this. During this inspection an updated safeguarding adults policy had been received from Devon Adult Services. This policy was posted on a staff notice board, which means that staff are kept up to date with changes. Staff were able to describe differing types of abuse and gave good details of what they would do if they suspected abuse was occurring. They were aware of the home’s ‘Whistle-blowing’ policy and that it would support them in reporting bad practice. They felt confident that they would be listened to if they raised concerns about bad practice. All of the people living at the home who responded to questionnaires agreed that they always or usually know who to speak to if unhappy or wanted to make a complaint. Staff who responded to questionnaires also confirmed they knew what to do if a person living at the home or a relative had concerns about the home. Pinhay House DS0000022010.V368623.R01.S.doc Version 5.2 Page 20 Environment The intended outcomes for Standards 19 – 26 are: 19. 20. 21. 22. 23. 24. 25. 26. Service users live in a safe, well-maintained environment. Service users have access to safe and comfortable indoor and outdoor communal facilities. Service users have sufficient and suitable lavatories and washing facilities. Service users have the specialist equipment they require to maximise their independence. Service users’ own rooms suit their needs. Service users live in safe, comfortable bedrooms with their own possessions around them. Service users live in safe, comfortable surroundings. The home is clean, pleasant and hygienic. The Commission considers Standards 19 and 26 the key standards to be inspected. JUDGEMENT – we looked at outcomes for the following standard(s): 19 & 26. Quality in this outcome area is good. Pinhay House provides a comfortable, clean and safe environment for those living in, working at and visiting the home. This judgement has been made using available evidence including a visit to this service. EVIDENCE: The home was clean, comfortable and homely at the time of this inspection. The providers and management have worked hard to improve and maintain the home since the last inspection. We saw bedrooms that were well decorated, bright and homely. The majority of them had been personalised and people living at the home told us that they were happy at the home. Environmental risk is being well managed and decoration, fitting and fixtures such as furniture, curtains, carpets, pictures, lamps throughout the home are Pinhay House DS0000022010.V368623.R01.S.doc Version 5.2 Page 21 of a good quality. Because of the age and design of the building maintenance and redecoration is ongoing. The home has a large lounge and dining room. Ample space is available for activities and for those who like to walk or have mobility problems and need the use of a wheelchair. The home was clean and fresh and people living there commented positively on the cleanliness of the home, and this was observed on the day of the inspection. In questionnaires, all people responded that the home was always or usually clean and fresh. There is a good supply of protective clothing and hand-washing facilities at the home and the laundry has equipment, which should effectively reduce the risk of cross infection. Everybody was well dressed at the time of this visit and several said that their clothes are well looked after. Pinhay House DS0000022010.V368623.R01.S.doc Version 5.2 Page 22 Staffing The intended outcomes for Standards 27 – 30 are: 27. 28. 29. 30. Service users’ needs are met by the numbers and skill mix of staff. Service users are in safe hands at all times. Service users are supported and protected by the home’s recruitment policy and practices. Staff are trained and competent to do their jobs. The Commission consider all the above are key standards to be inspected. JUDGEMENT – we looked at outcomes for the following standard(s): 27, 28, 29 & 30. Quality in this outcome area is good. People benefit from having trained, skilled staff in sufficient numbers to support them, and the smooth running of the home. This judgement has been made using available evidence including a visit to this service. EVIDENCE: On the day of the inspection a cook, cleaner, care coordinator, four care staff , an administrator, development coordinator and the manager were on duty throughout the morning as well as a gardener/maintenance person. In the afternoon, this changed to a care coordinator three care staff, and the manager being on duty. The home also employs three staff who are dedicated to undertaking activities, outings and providing entertainment at the home 5 days a week 10am-6pm. This means that on 3 days a week two work together to either undertake larger projects or diversify into different areas to cater for more needs at the same time. The rota shows that there are two waking staff on duty throughout the night. People living at the home who returned questionnaires felt there are always or usually enough staff on duty to care for them. Staff who responded to Pinhay House DS0000022010.V368623.R01.S.doc Version 5.2 Page 23 questionnaires felt that usually or sometimes there was enough staff to meet people’s needs. Comments made by staff included “ At odd times i.e. holidays and sickness we can be staff down”,“ Can’t account for illness at the last minute” and “Since I have worked at Pinhay it happens on my shift, we’re always short of staff. I work weekends”. People who responded to questionnaires and those spoken to during this inspection said that staff responded to their needs promptly. This was confirmed during this visit when staff responded promptly to peoples’ needs in a kindly manner. Throughout the day we saw staff asking people if they wanted a drink, were comfortable, reassuring people, visiting those who wished to stay in their rooms and engaging people in conversation. The manager discussed the recruitment procedure at the home and how it has been developed so that it considers the needs of people living at the home. They stressed the importance of making sure that only good quality carers are recruited so that a high standard of service can be offered at the home. We looked at two recently employed staff files. All included evidence that the home had conducted a robust recruitment procedure. Files included details of past employment, application form, training, evidence of identity, police checks and references. This procedure means that people living at the home are protected by the home’s recruitment procedure. All newly employed staff undergo a period of training when they start working at the home to enable them to get to know those living there, the home’s philosophy of care, safety procedure, care procedures, and the general layout of the home. The time taken to complete this training will depend on past experience and individual ability. All 5 staff that responded to questionnaires confirmed that their induction training covered everything they needed to know “very well”[2] or “mostly”[3] when they were first employed at the home. All confirmed that they are given training that is relevant to their role. The manager and care / development coordinators are very aware that to ensure that people are well cared for staff need to be provided with up to date training and are committed to provide this. The home is due to provide training in relation to moving and handling and we were told that this had been planned. The newly appointed development coordinator researches training that is available and plans the training programme at the home. One member of staff told us that training has improved at the home and there are more Pinhay House DS0000022010.V368623.R01.S.doc Version 5.2 Page 24 opportunities for staff to attend training and opportunities to advance. One member of staff is due to start nurse training soon and another aims to become a manual handling trainer and an assessor for National Vocational Qualification [NVQ] training. Senior care staff have had training in leadership skills and the recently recruited care coordinator is a registered nurse and will be undertaking “Leadership and Management” training in September 2008 with a view to a management post at the home. Information received from the home prior to this inspection indicated that 56 of staff are undertaking or have nationally recognised qualification [NVQ] This means that people living at the home will benefit from being cared for by well trained staff. Staff are kept up to date about people living at the home by having a handover meeting at the beginning of each shift when information is shared about individuals and any issues or problems that occur. Five staff that responded to questionnaires confirmed that the ways information is passed between staff “always” or “usually” works well. Pinhay House DS0000022010.V368623.R01.S.doc Version 5.2 Page 25 Management and Administration The intended outcomes for Standards 31 – 38 are: 31. 32. 33. 34. 35. 36. 37. 38. Service users live in a home which is run and managed by a person who is fit to be in charge, of good character and able to discharge his or her responsibilities fully. Service users benefit from the ethos, leadership and management approach of the home. The home is run in the best interests of service users. Service users are safeguarded by the accounting and financial procedures of the home. Service users’ financial interests are safeguarded. Staff are appropriately supervised. Service users’ rights and best interests are safeguarded by the home’s record keeping, policies and procedures. The health, safety and welfare of service users and staff are promoted and protected. The Commission considers Standards 31, 33, 35 and 38 the key standards to be inspected. JUDGEMENT – we looked at outcomes for the following standard(s): 31, 33, 35 & 38. Quality in this outcome area is good. The home has a management structure in place that together is working hard towards trying to make sure the home is run in peoples’ best interests. Health and safety is managed well. This judgement has been made using available evidence including a visit to this service. EVIDENCE: Prior to this inspection the Manager sent us information about the management of the home and how the home has carried out improvements based on the feedback from the last inspection. They and staff have worked hard to meet the requirements made at the last inspection. Pinhay House DS0000022010.V368623.R01.S.doc Version 5.2 Page 26 Records are securely stored and would be made available to people living at the home, or their representative, with their consent. Records are kept in lockable filing cabinets, and those seen were up to date. Peoples’ feedback about such things as the quality of their life at the home, staffing, meals, cleanliness and activities is sought on a daily basis. The manager told us that they had sent surveys to 15 relatives of people living at the home in August 2008. At the time of this visit 8 had been returned and were due to be collated by the end of September. The information provided will be looked at and any individual concerns will be dealt with immediately. The outcomes of the survey will be included in the home’s statement of purpose, brochure and newsletter, for interest parties to refer to. The manager also told us that they are hoping to initiate a “relative’s forum” and topics from the survey will discussed at meetings. Residents meetings are held at the home when people discuss topics such as menus, outings and activities. Minutes of these meetings are posted on a notice board in the dining room. This means that people living at the home are encouraged and supported to have a say in the running of the home. Health and safety at the home is generally well managed. During our tour of the building no immediate hazards were identified. Since the last inspection the owners have completed the programme to have all fire doors fitted with automatic closures and all first floor windows have restricted opening. The Handyman has recently completed Fire Warden Training, increasing the number of Fire Officers in the home. Information received before this inspection indicated that all equipment is well maintained regularly all of which contributes towards ensuring that Pinhay House is a safe place for people to live. Regular staff meetings, and individual appraisals are undertaken at the home. We were told that staff are encouraged to discuss any concerns with the management team. All staff that responded to questionnaires and those spoken to during the inspection confirmed that the manager or deputy met with them regularly to give support and discuss how you they were working. Comments included “the new manager is very approachable and meets with staff regularly” and “The manager has an open door policy and is very supportive of staff” Pinhay House DS0000022010.V368623.R01.S.doc Version 5.2 Page 27 SCORING OF OUTCOMES This page summarises the assessment of the extent to which the National Minimum Standards for Care Homes for Older People have been met and uses the following scale. The scale ranges from: 4 Standard Exceeded 2 Standard Almost Met (Commendable) (Minor Shortfalls) 3 Standard Met 1 Standard Not Met (No Shortfalls) (Major Shortfalls) “X” in the standard met box denotes standard not assessed on this occasion “N/A” in the standard met box denotes standard not applicable CHOICE OF HOME Standard No Score 1 2 3 4 5 6 ENVIRONMENT Standard No Score 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 X X 3 X X N/A HEALTH AND PERSONAL CARE Standard No Score 7 3 8 3 9 3 10 3 11 X DAILY LIFE AND SOCIAL ACTIVITIES Standard No Score 12 3 13 3 14 3 15 3 COMPLAINTS AND PROTECTION Standard No Score 16 3 17 X 18 3 3 X X X X X X 3 STAFFING Standard No Score 27 3 28 3 29 3 30 3 MANAGEMENT AND ADMINISTRATION Standard No 31 32 33 34 35 36 37 38 Score 3 X 3 X 3 X X 3 Pinhay House DS0000022010.V368623.R01.S.doc Version 5.2 Page 28 Are there any outstanding requirements from the last inspection? NO STATUTORY REQUIREMENTS This section sets out the actions, which must be taken so that the registered person/s meets the Care Standards Act 2000, Care Homes Regulations 2001 and the National Minimum Standards. The Registered Provider(s) must comply with the given timescales. No. Standard Regulation Requirement Timescale for action RECOMMENDATIONS These recommendations relate to National Minimum Standards and are seen as good practice for the Registered Provider/s to consider carrying out. No. 1. Refer to Standard OP3 Good Practice Recommendations Pre admission assessments should include details about people’s individual strengths and include goal setting. This will mean that people’s care will be delivered in a person centred way. Information recorded in care plans should provide sufficient detail to ensure that assessed needs are being met and monitored. Staff should undertake training appropriate to their roles. This relates to all staff undertaking regular updating of moving and handling training. 2. 3. OP7 OP30 Pinhay House DS0000022010.V368623.R01.S.doc Version 5.2 Page 29 Commission for Social Care Inspection South West Colston 33 33 Colston Avenue Bristol BS1 4UA National Enquiry Line: Telephone: 0845 015 0120 or 0191 233 3323 Textphone: 0845 015 2255 or 0191 233 3588 Email: enquiries@csci.gsi.gov.uk Web: www.csci.org.uk © This report is copyright Commission for Social Care Inspection (CSCI) and may only be used in its entirety. Extracts may not be used or reproduced without the express permission of CSCI Pinhay House DS0000022010.V368623.R01.S.doc Version 5.2 Page 30 - Please note that this information is included on www.bestcarehome.co.uk under license from the regulator. Re-publishing this information is in breach of the terms of use of that website. 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