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Care Home: Bethany Christian Home

  • 2 Woodside Lipson Plymouth Devon PL4 8QE
  • Tel: 01752220692
  • Fax: 01752220692

Bethany Christian Home is a large detached house, set in its own grounds in a residential area of Lipson, close to local amenities, public transport links and a public park. The home is run by a Christian organisation and there is a daily Christian worship service. However, the admission policy for the home is not exclusive. Bethany Christian Home is a large detached house, set in its own grounds in a residential area of Lipson, close to local amenities, public transport links and a public park. The home is run by a Christian organisation and there is a daily Christian worship service. However, the admission policy for the home is not exclusive. The home is registered to provide accommodation and personal care for 26 people over the age of 60. Accommodation is provided over three floors and comprises of two lounges, two dining rooms, two conservatory areas, and twenty-six single bedrooms, all of which have en suite facilities. A shaft lift provides access to all rooms in the main building. The home offers three bathrooms, two with assisted baths and one wet room with a walk in-shower, all are suitable to be used by people with restricted mobility. Many of the rooms have views over Plymouth Sound and others overlook a public park. The people living at the home are enabled to access any health or social care services they require and various social activities are arranged by the home. The garden is attractive, spacious and accessible. The weekly fee for the home in June 2007 was £355. Items not included in the fee include chiropody treatment, hairdressing, newspapers and magazines and personal toiletries. Information regarding the services provided at Bethany Christian Home can be obtained directly from the home.

  • Latitude: 50.375999450684
    Longitude: -4.1290001869202
  • Manager: Miss Ann Laidler
  • Price p/w: £355
  • UK
  • Total Capacity: 26
  • Type: Care home only
  • Provider: Bethany Christian Home Trust
  • Ownership: Voluntary
  • Care Home ID: 2964
Residents Needs:
Old age, not falling within any other category

Previous Inspections

This may not be the latest inspection for this service as we are having techinical problems updating from CQC - please check directly on the regulators website for the most recent report; bestcarehome hopes to be back to regular updates shortly.

For extracts, read the latest CQC inspection for Bethany Christian Home.

Key inspection report Care homes for older people Name: Address: Bethany Christian Home 2 Woodside Lipson Plymouth Devon PL4 8QE     The quality rating for this care home is:   two star good service A quality rating is our assessment of how well a care home is meeting the needs of the people who use it. We give a quality rating following a full review of the service. We call this full review a ‘key’ inspection. Lead inspector: Wendy Baines     Date: 2 1 0 4 2 0 1 0 This is a review of quality of outcomes that people experience in this care home. We believe high quality care should • • • • • Be safe Have the right outcomes, including clinical outcomes Be a good experience for the people that use it Help prevent illness, and promote healthy, independent living Be available to those who need it when they need it. The first part of the review gives the overall quality rating for the care home: • • • • 3 2 1 0 stars - excellent stars - good star - adequate star - poor There is also a bar chart that gives a quick way of seeing the quality of care that the home provides under key areas that matter to people. There is a summary of what we think this service does well, what they have improved on and, where it applies, what they need to do better. We use the national minimum standards to describe the outcomes that people should experience. National minimum standards are written by the Department of Health for each type of care service. After the summary there is more detail about our findings. The following table explains what you will see under each outcome area. Outcome area (for example Choice of home) These are the outcomes that people staying in care homes should experience. that people have said are important to them: They reflect the things This box tells you the outcomes that we will always inspect against when we do a key inspection. This box tells you any additional outcomes that we may inspect against when we do a key inspection. This is what people staying in this care home experience: Judgement: This box tells you our opinion of what we have looked at in this outcome area. We will say whether it is excellent, good, adequate or poor. Evidence: This box describes the information we used to come to our judgement. Care Homes for Older People Page 2 of 30 We review the quality of the service against outcomes from the National Minimum Standards (NMS). Those standards are written by the Department of Health for each type of care service. Copies of the National Minimum Standards – Care Homes for Older People can be found at www.dh.gov.uk or bought from The Stationery Office (TSO) PO Box 29, St Crispins, Duke Street, Norwich, NR3 1GN. Tel: 0870 600 5522. Online ordering from the Stationery Office is also available: www.tso.co.uk/bookshop The mission of the Care Quality Commission is to make care better for people by: • Regulating health and adult social care services to ensure quality and safety standards, drive improvement and stamp out bad practice • Protecting the rights of people who use services, particularly the most vulnerable and those detained under the Mental Health Act 1983 • Providing accessible, trustworthy information on the quality of care and services so people can make better decisions about their care and so that commissioners and providers of services can improve services. • Providing independent public accountability on how commissioners and providers of services are improving the quality of care and providing value for money. Reader Information Document Purpose Author Audience Further copies from Copyright Inspection report Care Quality Commission General public 0870 240 7535 (telephone order line) © Care Quality Commission 2010 This publication may be reproduced in whole or in part in any format or medium for non-commercial purposes, provided that it is reproduced accurately and not used in a derogatory manner or in a misleading context. The source should be acknowledged, by showing the publication title and © Care Quality Commission 2010. www.cqc.org.uk Internet address Care Homes for Older People Page 3 of 30 Information about the care home Name of care home: Address: Bethany Christian Home 2 Woodside Lipson Plymouth Devon PL4 8QE 01752220692 01752220692 bethanyhomepl4@btopenworld.com Telephone number: Fax number: Email address: Provider web address: Name of registered provider(s): Bethany Christian Home Trust Name of registered manager (if applicable) Miss Ann Laidler Type of registration: Number of places registered: care home 26 Conditions of registration: Category(ies) : Number of places (if applicable): Under 65 old age, not falling within any other category Additional conditions: The maximum number of service users who can be accommodated is 26 The registered person may provide the following category of service only: Care home only - Code PC to service users of either gender whose primary care needs on admission to the home are within the following category: Old age, not falling within any other category (Code OP) Date of last inspection Brief description of the care home Bethany Christian Home is a large detached house, set in its own grounds in a residential area of Lipson, close to local amenities, public transport links and a public park. The home is run by a Christian organisation and there is a daily Christian worship service. However, the admission policy for the home is not exclusive. Bethany Christian Home is a large detached house, set in its own grounds in a residential area Care Homes for Older People Page 4 of 30 Over 65 26 0 Brief description of the care home of Lipson, close to local amenities, public transport links and a public park. The home is run by a Christian organisation and there is a daily Christian worship service. However, the admission policy for the home is not exclusive. The home is registered to provide accommodation and personal care for 26 people over the age of 60. Accommodation is provided over three floors and comprises of two lounges, two dining rooms, two conservatory areas, and twenty-six single bedrooms, all of which have en suite facilities. A shaft lift provides access to all rooms in the main building. The home offers three bathrooms, two with assisted baths and one wet room with a walk in-shower, all are suitable to be used by people with restricted mobility. Many of the rooms have views over Plymouth Sound and others overlook a public park. The people living at the home are enabled to access any health or social care services they require and various social activities are arranged by the home. The garden is attractive, spacious and accessible. The weekly fee for the home in June 2007 was £355. Items not included in the fee include chiropody treatment, hairdressing, newspapers and magazines and personal toiletries. Information regarding the services provided at Bethany Christian Home can be obtained directly from the home. Care Homes for Older People Page 5 of 30 Summary This is an overview of what we found during the inspection. The quality rating for this care home is: Our judgement for each outcome: two star good service Choice of home Health and personal care Daily life and social activities Complaints and protection Environment Staffing Management and administration peterchart Poor Adequate Good Excellent How we did our inspection: This inspection was unannounced and took place over one full day on the 20th April 2010 as well as the morning of the 21st April. Miss Laidler, the Registered Manager was present throughout the visit. The Inspector spoke to most of the people who live in the home about their experiences, as well as the staff on duty, visitors, and a representative from the Board of Trustees. Ten people who use the service completed surveys and nine were completed and returned by staff. Prior to the visit the Provider sent information as requested by the Commission regarding the service, facilities and people receiving care. Care Homes for Older People Page 6 of 30 A tour of the building was made and documents relating to the care of people, recruitment practices and the general running of the home were examined. Care Homes for Older People Page 7 of 30 What the care home does well: What has improved since the last inspection? What they could do better: The provider must undertake a review of the current staffing levels in the home. Staff must be available in sufficient numbers to meet the social, emotional and health needs of all people who use the service. The provider should review current routines and staffing arrangements in the home to ensure that peoples social and leisure needs are identified and met. The procedure for documenting complaints and concerns should be reviewed. Minor concerns and complaints should be documented separately and in sufficient detail to reflect the nature and seriousness of the issue. In addition to the homes in-house training programme all staff should attend the Local Authority Safeguarding adults training. This will further ensure that staff have the Care Homes for Older People Page 8 of 30 skills, knowledge and understanding to recognise and report any incidents of abuse or suspected abuse. If you want to know what action the person responsible for this care home is taking following this report, you can contact them using the details on page 4. The report of this inspection is available from our website www.cqc.org.uk. You can get printed copies from enquiries@cqc.org.uk or by telephoning our order line 0870 240 7535. Care Homes for Older People Page 9 of 30 Details of our findings Contents Choice of home (standards 1 - 6) Health and personal care (standards 7 - 11) Daily life and social activities (standards 12 - 15) Complaints and protection (standards 16 - 18) Environment (standards 19 - 26) Staffing (standards 27 - 30) Management and administration (standards 31 - 38) Outstanding statutory requirements Requirements and recommendations from this inspection Care Homes for Older People Page 10 of 30 Choice of home These are the outcomes that people staying in care homes should experience. They reflect the things that people have said are important to them: People are confident that the care home can support them. This is because there is an accurate assessment of their needs that they, or people close to them, have been involved in. This tells the home all about them and the support they need. People who stay at the home only for intermediate care, have a clear assessment that includes a plan on what they hope for and want to achieve when they return home. People can decide whether the care home can meet their support and accommodation needs. This is because they, or people close to them, have been able to visit the home and have got full, clear, accurate and up to date information about the home. If they decide to stay in the home they know about their rights and responsibilities because there is an easy to understand contract or statement of terms and conditions between them and the care home that includes how much they will pay and what the home provides for the money. This is what people staying in this care home experience: Judgement: People using this service experience good quality outcomes in this area. We have made this judgement using a range of evidence, including a visit to this service. Information provided prior to admission ensures that people are able to make an informed choice about where they live and the services they receive. People can be confident that their needs will be thoroughly assessed before they move into the home. Evidence: The records of two people who had recently moved into the home were looked at during the visit. Prior to the admission the manager had completed a full assessment of the persons needs and requested additional information from other agencies, including hospital discharge notes and Social Services care plans where appropriate. The Inspector was able to meet with people who had recently moved to Bethany and also get feedback from relatives about their views on the quality of the service during these early days of admission. Care Homes for Older People Page 11 of 30 Evidence: People said that they had been invited to visit before moving in and some people were familiar with the home having previously visited friends or stayed for a period of respite. They said they had participated in the assessment of their care needs and this was evident within the documentation seen. Information had been provided about the home and the facilities available and the manager said that this is regularly updated to show any changes and to ensure people have sufficient information to make a choice about where they live and the services they receive. The manager said that for one new resident she had requested that Social Services complete a short term care plan with the individual to be sure that Bethany and long term residential care is the right decision for the person concerned. During the Inspection several family members were visiting and supporting their relatives to settle into their new surroundings. All said that the staff and management had been kind and helpful and had provided all the support needed during these early days. All of the staff on duty were spoken to during the visit and all had a good understanding of the people they support. Staff said that care plans and information about peoples daily care needs were clearly written and available for staff to refer to when required. Care Homes for Older People Page 12 of 30 Health and personal care These are the outcomes that people staying in care homes should experience. They reflect the things that people have said are important to them: People’s health, personal and social care needs are met. The home has a plan of care that the person, or someone close to them, has been involved in making. If they take medicine, they manage it themselves if they can. If they cannot manage their medicine, the care home supports them with it, in a safe way. People’s right to privacy is respected and the support they get from staff is given in a way that maintains their dignity. If people are approaching the end of their life, the care home will respect their choices and help them feel comfortable and secure. They, and people close to them, are reassured that their death will be handled with sensitivity, dignity and respect, and take account of their spiritual and cultural wishes. This is what people staying in this care home experience: Judgement: People using this service experience good quality outcomes in this area. We have made this judgement using a range of evidence, including a visit to this service. The health and personal care needs of people are well met with evidence of good multi-disciplinary working taking place when required. Support and care is provided in a way that promotes and protects peoples privacy, dignity and independence. Evidence: The Inspector was able to spend time sitting with and talking to people who live in the home. All those spoken to said that they were very happy living at Bethany and that they felt well supported by kind and caring staff. Many commented that a Christian environment was very important to them and that this was one of the main reasons they had chosen to live at this particular home. Staff were observed supporting people in a sensitive and respectful manner and when staff were able to and had time, the interaction between them and the residents was warm and friendly. Care Homes for Older People Page 13 of 30 Evidence: All of the people who completed a survey prior to the visit said that they always recieve the care and support they need, and that staff are available when they need them. One person said that they had been particularly unwell before they moved to Bethany but that they had started eating and drinking again within a few weeks of moving in. The family said that there had been a noticable improvement in their relatives health and well being since moving into the home. The care records of four people were looked at in detail during the visit. Each person had a written care plan, which provided good detailed information about their care needs and how care should be delivered. Information was available about how people like to spend their day as well as any particular preferences about how people like to be supported. This demonstrates that the home understands and respects the individual needs of people who use the service. Care plans had been reviewed monthly and were up to date. Plans also included risk assessments relating to the environment and specific needs of each individual. People had been assessed to identify any risks in relation to nutrition, falls and pressure sores and guidelines were in place where a risk had been identified. Some of the care plans seen detailed the need for staff to monitor food and fluid intake. Staff spoken to were aware of these arrangements for some individuals and monitoring forms were up to date. Information returned in surveys as well as discussions during the inspection confirmed that staff are provided with good, up to date information about the needs of people they support or care for. People living at the home have access to all health care services and this information was recorded in the individual files examined. These files recorded that there was input from other professionals including GPs, chiropodist, Optical and hearing services. Discussion confirmed that people can choose whether to see health professionals in the home or have support from staff to attend surgeries, clinics and other health facilities within the local community. The manager said that the home had worked closely with a local pharmacy service to further improve their medication procedures. Information provided prior to the inspection stated that discussion with the Pharmacist has resulted in increased safety in medication administration. Following advice from the pharmacist a new refridgerator had been purchased for medication requiring low temperature storage. Care Homes for Older People Page 14 of 30 Evidence: Staff spoken to and feedback within surveys confirmed that staff are given training relating to healthcare and medication. People are supported to manage their own medication if they choose to do so. The District Nursing service visits the home regularly to support the staff in meeting health care needs. The home makes every effort along with District Nurses and other health professionals to support people who are terminally ill to stay in the home as long as their needs can be met. End of life care and funeral requests are recorded within peoples care plans. Care Homes for Older People Page 15 of 30 Daily life and social activities These are the outcomes that people staying in care homes should experience. They reflect the things that people have said are important to them: Each person is treated as an individual and the care home is responsive to his or her race, culture, religion, age, disability, gender and sexual orientation. They are part of their local community. The care home supports people to follow personal interests and activities. People are able to keep in touch with family, friends and representatives. They are as independent as they can be, lead their chosen lifestyle and have the opportunity to make the most of their abilities. People have nutritious and attractive meals and snacks, at a time and place to suit them. There are no additional outcomes. This is what people staying in this care home experience: Judgement: People using this service experience good quality outcomes in this area. We have made this judgement using a range of evidence, including a visit to this service. Daily routines and staffing arrangements in the home restrict opportunities to fully explore and meet peoples social and leisure needs. Dietary needs of people are well catered for with a balanced and varied selection of food available that meets peoples tastes and choices. Evidence: When the Inspector arrived the atmosphere in the home was warm and welcoming. Most people had finished their breakfast and were attending the morning prayer session in the communal sitting room. Morning coffee and prayers are organised every day for people who choose to attend. Several of the people spoken to said that this was a very important and enjoyable part of their day. The manager said that most people in the home tend to make their own decisions about how they occupy their time and several go out regularly with family and friends. She said that although there is no regular activity plan they do aim to organise one or two outings each year, and have a summer fair and Christmas Carol service. Several people had a daily newspaper delivered to their room and books were available from a Care Homes for Older People Page 16 of 30 Evidence: small library within the home. Visitors were seen coming and going throughout the day, and those spoken to said that they were always made to feel welcome and felt that they would be free to visit at any time. The Inspector spent time talking with people in the communal lounge areas and bedrooms. Everyone spoken to said that the morning prayer meeting was the only planned activity during the week and people could choose if they wanted to attend. Some people said that they prefer and choose to spend time in their rooms and would be unlikely to join in any organised activities. However, three people spoken to said that it would be nice to have more to do during the day and one person said that the evenings can be boring. Two people spoken to said that it would be nice to have some old time music playing and more opportunities to sit and chat with people with similar interests. One person said that it would be nice if the staff had more time to sit and chat but that they were usually very busy. The Inspector observed staff supporting people back to their bedrooms after the morning prayer meeting. Staff spoken to said that although people could choose to stay in the sitting room or other communal parts of the home many had got into a routine of spending most of the day in their bedrooms. Staff said that they try their best to spend time with people but that most of their shift is taken up with care and domestic tasks. People described the food in the home as excellent and good. Care records contained detailed information about peoples likes and dislikes and the kitchen staff had a good understanding about peoples particular dietary needs and preferences. During the morning people were asked by staff their choice of hot lunch time meal and options were available on the menu. The kitchen was clearly a busy part of the house with plenty of home baking and fresh fruit and vegetables available. The dining area was laid out attractively for lunch and vegetables and sauces were served in seperate side dishes for people to serve themselves. Several people spoken to said that they prefered this system of being able to choose as much or as little as they wished rather than having a large amount served on one plate. The meal time was relaxed and unrushed and staff were observed assisting people who required support as well as checking that everyone was happy with their meal. Care Homes for Older People Page 17 of 30 Complaints and protection These are the outcomes that people staying in care homes should experience. They reflect the things that people have said are important to them: If people have concerns with their care, they or people close to them know how to complain. Any concern is looked into and action taken to put things right. The care home safeguards people from abuse and neglect and takes action to follow up any allegations. People’s legal rights are protected, including being able to vote in elections. This is what people staying in this care home experience: Judgement: People using this service experience good quality outcomes in this area. We have made this judgement using a range of evidence, including a visit to this service. People who live at Bethany can be confident that their views and concerns will be listened to and dealt with. Peoples rights are respected and protected. Evidence: A copy of the homes complaints procedure is available on the notice board in the communal hallway and also in the information pack provided to all new people who use the service. Information provided prior to the inspection described an open culture within the home where people are encouraged and supported to share their views and raise any concerns. Comment cards were available in the main entrance allowing anonymous comment about the services provided. Discussion and staffing rotas confirmed that the Registered Manager is available in the home each day. Throughout the inspection the manager was seen spending time with people who use the service and greeting relatives and professionals who visited the home. People said that the manager and staff were very approachable and that they were confident that any issues of concern would be listened to and dealt with. The home has a book to record minor concerns raised and this included the action and Care Homes for Older People Page 18 of 30 Evidence: outcome for each issue raised. One of the issues recorded was of a more serious nature and needed to be documented separately and in more detail. The Care Quality Commission had not received any complaints about this service since the last key Inspection. Information about local advocacy services were available and facilities provided for the safekeeping of peoples money and valuables. The Registered Manager has attended the Local Authority Safeguarding Adults training. This training is then delivered to the staff team as part of their Induction and on-going training programme. The manager recognised that all staff would benefit from attending local Authority training to ensure that they are fully aware of the correct procedures to follow in the event of a allegation or incident of abuse in the home. Care Homes for Older People Page 19 of 30 Environment These are the outcomes that people staying in care homes should experience. They reflect the things that people have said are important to them: People stay in a safe and well-maintained home that is homely, clean, pleasant and hygienic. People stay in a home that has enough space and facilities for them to lead the life they choose and to meet their needs. The home makes sure they have the right specialist equipment that encourages and promotes their independence. Their room feels like their own, it is comfortable and they feel safe when they use it. This is what people staying in this care home experience: Judgement: People using this service experience excellent quality outcomes in this area. We have made this judgement using a range of evidence, including a visit to this service. The standard of the environment within this home is good providing people with an attractive, homely and safe place to live. Recent investment has significantly improved the facilities available in the home creating further improvement and comfort for those living there and visiting. Evidence: The home was found to be clean, tidy and well maintained throughout. All of the people spoken to and those who completed surveys said that the home was always fresh and clean. One person said that the staff do an excellent job of keeping his room clean and tidy. There are plenty of communal areas for people to sit and the dining area has been well organised to ensure that people can enjoy their meals in comfortable and pleasant surroundings. Several people said they liked to sit in the sun room by the main entrance of the house so that they could enjoy the comings and goings of staff and visitors and the lovely views over the garden and Plymouth Sound. The garden area is well maintained with handrails leading down to an attractive patio area. Some people said that they like to sit in the garden during the summer months Care Homes for Older People Page 20 of 30 Evidence: and also enjoy organised garden parties and afternoon cream teas. Since the last Inspection a large extension has been completed, which has provided six additional en-suite bedrooms and extra parking space. Information provided prior to the inspection confirmed that all bedrooms in the home now have en-suite facilities. All bedrooms and communal areas were attractively decorated. People spoken to said they were encouraged to bring in their personal belongings and decorate their rooms to their individual taste. Radiators were covered and hot water temperatures controlled to prevent the risk of burns and scalds. Approved hold open devices had been fitted to all bedroom doors to allow people to keep their doors open if they wish, while ensuring that the fire protection systems remain efficient. All communal toilets and bath facilities were found to be clean and in good order. A range of small adaptations and equipment was available for people who require some support with personal care tasks. The kitchen and Laundry facilities were well organised with systems and procedures in place for the control of infection. Care Homes for Older People Page 21 of 30 Staffing These are the outcomes that people staying in care homes should experience. They reflect the things that people have said are important to them: People have safe and appropriate support as there are enough competent staff on duty at all times. They have confidence in the staff at the home because checks have been done to make sure that they are suitable to care for them. Their needs are met and they are cared for by staff who get the relevant training and support from their managers. There are no additional outcomes. This is what people staying in this care home experience: Judgement: People using this service experience adequate quality outcomes in this area. We have made this judgement using a range of evidence, including a visit to this service. Although staff work hard to meet the needs of people living in the home the current staffing levels are not always sufficient to meet the social needs of people who use the service. The arrangements for the Induction of staff are good with the staff demonstrating a clear understanding of their roles. Recruitment procedures are robust and ensure the safety and protection of people who use the service. Evidence: The staff were described by people living in the home as very kind and caring. One person who completed a survey said that Bethany is a caring, friendly, Christian home with staff and management doing their utmost for the comfort and well being of people who live there. During the inspection staff were observed supporting people in a dignified and respectful manner at all times. Two care staff are on duty during the day and two waking staff on duty at night. These numbers do not include the Registered manager or those people who assist her with the management of the home. Care staff are supported by catering and domestic Care Homes for Older People Page 22 of 30 Evidence: staff each day. Some of the staff who were spoken to and who completed surveys did not feel that there were sufficient numbers of care staff available to meet the needs of all the people who live in the home, particularly during busy times of the day or when people are unwell. The manager said that staffing levels are regularly reviewed and that additional staff have been employed to undertake domestic tasks during the busy times of day such as mornings and mealtimes. Discussion and records confirmed that due to ill-health one person was requiring two staff to support them with some personal care tasks. Some of the care staff spoken to said that although they try their best, two care staff were not sufficient to meet these changing needs. Some of the people spoken to who live in the home said that they felt the staff do their very best but are often rushed off their feet and have little time just to sit and chat. A sample of staff files were examined, including those for two newly appointed staff. The files held the necessary pre-employment documentation, including two written references and a Criminal Records check. Staff spoken to confirmed that they had completed a full induction programme that provided them with information about the values and principles of good care practices and their responsibilities. Staff spoken to said that they are able to attend regular training relevant to their role and a record is kept of all the training attended and planned. All staff attend training relating to health and safety including, First Aid, Fire Safety, Manual Handling and Food Hygiene. The Registered manager confirmed that she has attended Safeguarding Adults training provided by the Local Authority and that this is then provided in- house to the staff team. The manager noted that in addition to in- house training all staff should attend the training provided by the local Authority so that they are fully aware of the procedures to follow if they suspect or witness an incident of abuse in the home. Over 50 of staff had completed a National Vocational Qualification in Care, a nationally recognised qualification for which they have to demonstrate their skills in supporting older people. Care Homes for Older People Page 23 of 30 Management and administration These are the outcomes that people staying in care homes should experience. They reflect the things that people have said are important to them: People have confidence in the care home because it is led and managed appropriately. People control their own money and choose how they spend it. If they or someone close to them cannot manage their money, it is managed by the care home in their best interests. The environment is safe for people and staff because appropriate health and safety practices are carried out. People get the right support from the care home because the manager runs it appropriately with an open approach that makes them feel valued and respected. The people staying at the home are safeguarded because it follows clear financial and accounting procedures, keeps records appropriately and ensures their staff understand the way things should be done. They get the right care because the staff are supervised and supported by their managers. This is what people staying in this care home experience: Judgement: People using this service experience good quality outcomes in this area. We have made this judgement using a range of evidence, including a visit to this service. People who live at Bethany benefit from an open, inclusive and positive style of management. Staff are well supported on a day- to- day basis, however the absence of formal supervision and staff meetings could result in staff not receiving the level of support required to fulfill their role and meet peoples needs. Evidence: The Registered Manager Miss Laidler is responsible for the day- to- day running of the home. She is supported by The Board of Trustees and an administrator who works one day each week. Discussion and records confirmed that Miss Laidler attends training courses to keep herself up to date with good practice issues and current legislation. During the last twelve months she has completed a Dignity in Care course, Local Authority safeguarding adults, and Infection control training. Staff, visitors and people who use the service said that Miss Laidler is always available Care Homes for Older People Page 24 of 30 Evidence: and has an open-door policy. Throughout the Inspection the manager was seen talking with residents and greeting relatives and professionals who visited. People said they felt safe, secure and happy in their home and that the home was well managed. Relatives are invited to join the Friends of Bethany Christian home and have the opportunity to meet with the Registered manager and Board of Trustees three times a year. These meetings review the management and development of the home and the quality of services provided. A member of the Board visits the home unannounced each month to meet with people and staff to review the standards of care and the environment, ensuring standards remain high. The manager confirmed that she meets with people on an daily basis to ensure they are satisfied with the care and support they receive. Annual surveys are sent to the people who live in the home as well as their relatives to gather their views on the quality of the service provided. Examples were given of where changes had been made as a result of the feedback received. People are encouraged and supported to maintain responsibility for their own finances if they are able to do so and are provided with lockable storage space for money and other valuables. The home does provide safe storage should anyone wish to use this facility. All transactions are recorded for each person and receipts obtained for their records. A sample of these records were checked and found to be accurate. Information about how people choose to manage their finances and any support required by the home had not been recorded as part of their care plan. Staff supervision is informal and not recorded. A daily record book and handover meetings ensures that staff are aware of any important issues relating to the home or an individual before they start work. Staff have an appraisal meeting each year to look at their personal development, progress and any training needs. Staff spoken to said that they felt well supported by their colleagues and management.Some of the staff spoken to said that they think the support could be improved by the introduction of regular staff meetings. The fire logbook indicated that the required weekly and monthly testing of the fire alarm system was being undertaken and service contracts ensure equipment is maintained in good working order. Care Homes for Older People Page 25 of 30 Evidence: The kitchen and storage areas were found to be clean and tidy and records of fridge and freezer temperatures were recorded daily, indicating that regular cleaning and monitoring were being undertaken. Care Homes for Older People Page 26 of 30 Are there any outstanding requirements from the last inspection? Yes £ No R Outstanding statutory requirements These are requirements that were set at the previous inspection, but have still not been met. They say what the registered person had to do to meet the Care Standards Act 2000, Care Homes Regulations 2001 and the National Minimum Standards. No. Standard Regulation Requirement Timescale for action Care Homes for Older People Page 27 of 30 Requirements and recommendations from this inspection: Immediate requirements: These are immediate requirements that were set on the day we visited this care home. The registered person had to meet these within 48 hours. No. Standard Regulation Requirement Timescale for action Statutory requirements These requirements set out what the registered person must do to meet the Care Standards Act 2000, Care Homes Regulations 2001 and the National Minimum Standards. The registered person(s) must do this within the timescales we have set. No. Standard Regulation Requirement Timescale for action 1 27 18 The provider must undertake a review of the current staffing levels in the home. Staff must be available in sufficient numbers to meet the health and social care needs of all people living in the home. 26/06/2010 Recommendations These recommendations are taken from the best practice described in the National Minimum Standards and the registered person(s) should consider them as a way of improving their service. No Refer to Standard Good Practice Recommendations 1 12 The provider should review current routines and staffing arrangements in the home to ensure that peoples social and leisure needs are identified, documented and sufficiently met. Consideration should be given to creating a more stimulating and homely environment. The home should seek the views of the residents and consider their varied interests when planning the routines of daily living both in the home and the community. The routines, activities and plans should be resident focused, regularly reviewed, and flexible to meet individuals changing needs, choices and Care Homes for Older People Page 28 of 30 Recommendations These recommendations are taken from the best practice described in the National Minimum Standards and the registered person(s) should consider them as a way of improving their service. No Refer to Standard Good Practice Recommendations wishes. 2 16 The home should review the current practice for documenting complaints. Minor concerns and complaints should be documented separately and in sufficient detail to reflect the nature and seriousness of the issue. In addition to the homes current training programme all staff should attend the Local Authority safeguarding adults training so that they are fully aware of the locally agreed protocols for recognising and reporting incidents of abuse. The provider should ensure that staff are appropriately supervised. Supervision should be at regular intervals and cover all aspects of practice, philosophy of care in the home and career development needs. These meetings should be documented and take place on 1:1 basis. Any arrangements to support people with their personal finances should be agreed, recorded and reviewed as part of the service user care plan. 5 36 Consideration should also be given to the development of regular staff meeting so that staff can discuss issues relating to the home and people they support. 3 18 4 34 Care Homes for Older People Page 29 of 30 Helpline: Telephone: 03000 616161 Email: enquiries@cqc.org.uk Web: www.cqc.org.uk We want people to be able to access this information. If you would like a summary in a different format or language please contact our helpline or go to our website. Copyright © (2009) Care Quality Commission (CQC). This publication may be reproduced in whole or in part, free of charge, in any format or medium provided that it is not used for commercial gain. This consent is subject to the material being reproduced accurately and on proviso that it is not used in a derogatory manner or misleading context. The material should be acknowledged as CQC copyright, with the title and date of publication of the document specified. Care Homes for Older People Page 30 of 30 - Please note that this information is included on www.bestcarehome.co.uk under license from the regulator. Re-publishing this information is in breach of the terms of use of that website. Discrete codes and changes have been inserted throughout the textual data shown on the site that will provide incontrovertable proof of copying in the event this information is re-published on other websites. The policy of www.bestcarehome.co.uk is to use all legal avenues to pursue such offenders, including recovery of costs. You have been warned!

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