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Care Home: Dove Court

  • Seaton Down Hill Seaton Devon EX12 2JD
  • Tel: 0129722451
  • Fax: 0129723278

Dove Court provides accommodation and personal care for up to 19 older people. The home is situated on the main route into Seaton. It has views overlooking the town and the coast. The home has 3 double bedrooms, 2 with ensuite facilities and 13 single rooms, 7 with ensuite facilities. The bedrooms are on both the ground and first floors and the floors are linked by a passenger lift. Communal areas are made up of a large lounge, a smaller lounge, and a conservatory. Outside the home there are attractive gardens, paved and sitting areas and ample parking. The fees charged at this home range from £323.00 - £600.00 per week. These fees do not include such things as toiletries, newspapers and hairdressing. Additional information about this home is available direct from the home.

  • Latitude: 50.712001800537
    Longitude: -3.085000038147
  • Manager: Mrs Susan Jane Edgerton
  • Price p/w: £323
  • UK
  • Total Capacity: 19
  • Type: Care home only
  • Provider: Doveleigh Care Limited
  • Ownership: Private
  • Care Home ID: 5577
Residents Needs:
Old age, not falling within any other category, Physical disability

Previous Inspections

This may not be the latest inspection for this service as we are having techinical problems updating from CQC - please check directly on the regulators website for the most recent report; bestcarehome hopes to be back to regular updates shortly.

For extracts, read the latest CQC inspection for Dove Court.

CARE HOMES FOR OLDER PEOPLE Dove Court Seaton Down Hill Seaton Devon EX12 2JD Lead Inspector Teresa Anderson Unannounced Inspection 25th September 2008 10:00 X10015.doc Version 1.40 Page 1 The Commission for Social Care Inspection aims to: • • • • Put the people who use social care first Improve services and stamp out bad practice Be an expert voice on social care Practise what we preach in our own organisation Reader Information Document Purpose Author Audience Further copies from Copyright Inspection Report CSCI General Public 0870 240 7535 (telephone order line) This report is copyright Commission for Social Care Inspection (CSCI) and may only be used in its entirety. Extracts may not be used or reproduced without the express permission of CSCI www.csci.org.uk Internet address Dove Court DS0000021956.V370529.R01.S.doc Version 5.2 Page 2 This is a report of an inspection to assess whether services are meeting the needs of people who use them. The legal basis for conducting inspections is the Care Standards Act 2000 and the relevant National Minimum Standards for this establishment are those for Care Homes for Older People. They can be found at www.dh.gov.uk or obtained from The Stationery Office (TSO) PO Box 29, St Crispins, Duke Street, Norwich, NR3 1GN. Tel: 0870 600 5522. Online ordering: www.tso.co.uk/bookshop This report is a public document. Extracts may not be used or reproduced without the prior permission of the Commission for Social Care Inspection. Dove Court DS0000021956.V370529.R01.S.doc Version 5.2 Page 3 SERVICE INFORMATION Name of service Dove Court Address Seaton Down Hill Seaton Devon EX12 2JD Telephone number Fax number Email address Provider Web address Name of registered provider(s)/company (if applicable) Name of registered manager (if applicable) Type of registration No. of places registered (if applicable) 01297 22451 01297 23278 admin@doveleighcare.co.uk Doveleigh Care Limited Mrs Maureen Frances Goddard Care Home 19 Category(ies) of Old age, not falling within any other category registration, with number (19), Physical disability over 65 years of age of places (19) Dove Court DS0000021956.V370529.R01.S.doc Version 5.2 Page 4 SERVICE INFORMATION Conditions of registration: Date of last inspection 2nd October 2006 Brief Description of the Service: Dove Court provides accommodation and personal care for up to 19 older people. The home is situated on the main route into Seaton. It has views overlooking the town and the coast. The home has 3 double bedrooms, 2 with ensuite facilities and 13 single rooms, 7 with ensuite facilities. The bedrooms are on both the ground and first floors and the floors are linked by a passenger lift. Communal areas are made up of a large lounge, a smaller lounge, and a conservatory. Outside the home there are attractive gardens, paved and sitting areas and ample parking. The fees charged at this home range from £323.00 - £600.00 per week. These fees do not include such things as toiletries, newspapers and hairdressing. Additional information about this home is available direct from the home. Dove Court DS0000021956.V370529.R01.S.doc Version 5.2 Page 5 SUMMARY This is an overview of what the inspector found during the inspection. The quality rating for this service is 2 star. This means the people who use this service experience good quality outcomes. This unannounced inspection was undertaken as part of the normal programme of inspection. The visit to the home began at 10.00am and finished at 4.00pm. During this visit we (the commission) spoke with the majority of people living here. We also looked closely at the care and accommodation offered to three people living here as a way of helping us to understand the experiences of people using this service. This is called case tracking. We observed the care and attention given by staff to these people, we looked at their assessments and plans of care, the environment in relation to their needs and at how their health and personal care needs are met. We spoke with the owner (by phone), with the person in charge and with three members of staff. We visited all communal and service areas in the home and saw approximately ten bedrooms. Records in relation to care assessment, care planning, medication, residents’ monies and fire safety were inspected. Before our visit to the home the owner and manager provided information about the service in their Annual Quality Assurance Assessment (AQAA). In addition questionnaires asking for feedback and comments about the home were sent to people living at the home, to staff and to health and social care staff. Their feedback and comments are included in this report. What the service does well: Dove Court is managed by a Registered Manager with many years experience of working with older people and providing quality care. She has recently obtained the Registered Manager’s Award. In addition the home also has a deputy manager, one of the co-owners visits the on most days and another coowner visits the home to carry out unannounced visits and audits. The home is well managed and the manager is described as ‘receptive’ and ‘responsive’. People say ‘any niggles or requests are dealt with quickly and easily’ and that they feel they ‘have an input into the way the home is run’ on their behalf. They say they ‘feel very safe living here’. Dove Court DS0000021956.V370529.R01.S.doc Version 5.2 Page 6 People who consider coming to live here undergo a comprehensive assessment to ensure the service can meet their needs. They are then given a contract which gives them clear terms and conditions of occupancy. After admission a care plan is designed for each person that details his or her care needs, preferences and daily routines. As staff get to know people, they update this ensuring that each person benefits from individualised care. People have easy access to healthcare professionals meaning that their health improves or is maintained after admission. The home has an ethos of encouraging independence and supporting people to maintain their abilities. In this way people feel useful, valued and respected. Staff show respect by promoting people’s privacy and ensuring that people have their rights to choice and decision making upheld. People told us that the staff are always or usually available when needed and are described as ‘very caring’ and ‘excellent’, ‘nothing is too much trouble’ for them. We found that staff receive appropriate training and feel well supported by the management team. The majority of people living here tend to enjoy their own company and do not join in with arranged activities such as quizzes or bingo. However, staff feel that they could provide more stimulation to encourage the learning of new skills and some are going to receive training in this. Some people living here really enjoy the trips out on the homes own minibus. People living here like the quality of the food served and particularly like the days that the cook is on duty as she sees each person individually to find out what they would like to eat and bakes cakes. On the days that the cook is not on duty, the carers cook. This home is decorated and styled in a very homely way which people living here say suits them well. All furniture is of domestic character and of good quality. There are lots of pictures, plants and flowers around the home, adding to the homely feel. The home is very clean and well maintained. What has improved since the last inspection? Since the last inspection the manager has successfully completed the Registered Managers Award. The home has purchased a minibus for use by the people living here and the menus have been expanded and now offer more variety. Care plans have been updated and follow the guidelines set out in Care for Life produced by the local Primary Care Trust for people with diabetes. In addition care plans have been updated to help staff to support people to remain continent. Dove Court DS0000021956.V370529.R01.S.doc Version 5.2 Page 7 The radiators have all beeen covered to prevent accidental scalding. What they could do better: Please contact the provider for advice of actions taken in response to this inspection. The report of this inspection is available from enquiries@csci.gsi.gov.uk or by contacting your local CSCI office. The summary of this inspection report can be made available in other formats on request. Dove Court DS0000021956.V370529.R01.S.doc Version 5.2 Page 8 DETAILS OF INSPECTOR FINDINGS CONTENTS Choice of Home (Standards 1–6) Health and Personal Care (Standards 7-11) Daily Life and Social Activities (Standards 12-15) Complaints and Protection (Standards 16-18) Environment (Standards 19-26) Staffing (Standards 27-30) Management and Administration (Standards 31-38) Scoring of Outcomes Statutory Requirements Identified During the Inspection Dove Court DS0000021956.V370529.R01.S.doc Version 5.2 Page 9 Choice of Home The intended outcomes for Standards 1 – 6 are: 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. Prospective service users have the information they need to make an informed choice about where to live. Each service user has a written contract/ statement of terms and conditions with the home. No service user moves into the home without having had his/her needs assessed and been assured that these will be met. Service users and their representatives know that the home they enter will meet their needs. Prospective service users and their relatives and friends have an opportunity to visit and assess the quality, facilities and suitability of the home. Service users assessed and referred solely for intermediate care are helped to maximise their independence and return home. The Commission considers Standards 3 and 6 the key standards to be inspected. JUDGEMENT – we looked at outcomes for the following standard(s): 2 and 3. Standard 6 was not inspected, as this service does not provide intermediate care. Quality in this outcome area is good. People who come to live here can be assured that they will know what they are paying for and that the service can meet their needs. This judgement has been made using available evidence including a visit to this service. EVIDENCE: We wanted to know if people living here have contracts and if these are fair. We asked in questionnaires if people had contracts. The majority responded that they did not. However, when we visited the home and spoke with people face to face, they told us that their relatives, friends or social services had dealt with this aspect of the service. We spoke to one person who deals with their own finances, including contracting with the home. They told us they have a clear contract and that they are informed of any changes. Dove Court DS0000021956.V370529.R01.S.doc Version 5.2 Page 10 We looked at three contracts of the people whose care and accommodation we had looked at closely (case tracked). We found that these identify the bedroom that the person occupies, what the fees cover and what the terms of occupancy and conditions of termination of contract are. We also wanted to know how peoples’ needs were assessed before they came to live at this home. People told us that the manager had come to see them and told them about the home and had asked questions about their needs and about what they like to do. People told us that their decision to come and live here was a good one. We looked at the written assessments of people’s needs, carried out by the manager. We found that these contain important information written in enough detail to ensure that the service has the right information to ensure that the decision to admit a person is the right one. In addition the information given to us by the home in the AQAA tells us that no one has moved in to the home then moved out soon after or suddenly. This shows that the manager is making good decisions in relation to whose needs this service can meet. One person wrote ‘This home was chosen by my family. They have made such a good choice’. Dove Court DS0000021956.V370529.R01.S.doc Version 5.2 Page 11 Health and Personal Care The intended outcomes for Standards 7 – 11 are: 7. 8. 9. 10. 11. The service user’s health, personal and social care needs are set out in an individual plan of care. Service users’ health care needs are fully met. Service users, where appropriate, are responsible for their own medication, and are protected by the home’s policies and procedures for dealing with medicines. Service users feel they are treated with respect and their right to privacy is upheld. Service users are assured that at the time of their death, staff will treat them and their family with care, sensitivity and respect. The Commission considers Standards 7, 8, 9 and 10 the key standards to be inspected. JUDGEMENT – we looked at outcomes for the following standard(s): 7, 8, 9 and 10. Quality in this outcome area is good. People living here have their care needs anticipated and met. Some improvements to medication and care planning records would further ensure the safety of the people living here. This judgement has been made using available evidence including a visit to this service. EVIDENCE: We wanted to know that peoples care needs are assessed, are written down for all staff to follow, that staff understand the care plans and that people get the care they need in a way they prefer. We looked at three plans of care and found that they are generally written in sufficient detail to ensure that staff have the information they need to meet each persons needs in a way that suits that person. This includes telling staff about each persons daily routine, for example what time they like to get up, how they like to be woken up and what time they like to go to bed. We saw Dove Court DS0000021956.V370529.R01.S.doc Version 5.2 Page 12 that an assessment is made of each person that relates to meeting their nutritional and skin care needs. We also saw that doctors, district nurses, dentists, opticians and chiropodists are contacted frequently ensuring that peoples’ healthcare needs are well tended to. People we spoke with told us their healthcare needs are well met and that staff are quick to call the doctor when needed. They say that staff get to know them and ‘their ways’ and make sure that they get the care they need in a way that they like. One person wrote ‘ the manager and doctors work well and closely together, and we get better medical support than if we were in our own homes’. People also told us that staff treat them well and respect their individuality, privacy and dignity. They say for example that staff make sure that doors are closed when they receive personal care, that they only receive personal care from the gender of their choice and that staff speak to them respectfully. We saw/heard staff knocking on doors before entering, calling people by their preferred name, making eye contact with people when talking with them and closing doors when giving personal care. All of this shows that people’s dignity is protected. We spoke to staff about the three people we had case tracked. They were very familiar with their plans of care and with the principles behind having this written plan of care. The staff we spoke with all knew about ‘the little things’ that are important to these three people and told us about how they enjoyed making people happy by doing these things. All this means that the care people get is individualised and shows that staff respect them as people. The information the management team provided prior to this visit told us that since the last inspection a care plan for people with diabetes (recommended by the local Primary Care Trust) had been implemented. We saw this in use in relation to one person living here who has diabetes. This shows that the home is up to date with good practice. We saw that care plans are generally reviewed and updated when needed. We saw that there is a system in place where the co-owner (a nurse) audits care plans on a monthly basis and makes recommendations for improvement. We saw an item in a care plan that would benefit from updating and from improved record keeping. This relates to one person who, according to records, is at high risk of developing a pressure sore. This person told us that they used to have a pressure-relieving mattress on their bed. However, they say that when this broke it was not replaced. They told us that they would prefer the mattress not to be replaced as they sleep more comfortably on an ordinary (hospital style) mattress. When we spoke with this person we found that, whilst they have the right to make this decision, that they did not seem to have all the information they need to make an informed decision. We looked Dove Court DS0000021956.V370529.R01.S.doc Version 5.2 Page 13 for the records relating to this decision and we could not find any. In addition there was no evidence in the records that alternative mattresses or overlays for mattresses (which might reduce the risk of developing pressure sores and be acceptable to this person) had been tried. We also found in care plans evidence that some people, as is best practice, are supported to manage their own medicines. However, the risk assessments carried out to ensure this is done safely have not always been updated as they should be. In addition records do not show a complete audit trail of those medicines that are managed by people themselves, meaning that some medicines might not be easily accounted for. We looked at the way medicines are managed in relation to the three people we case tracked. Apart from the issues already noted we found that their medicines are stored safely and that records are up to date. We also checked some medicines that are stored as ‘controlled drugs’. We found that records are up to date and accurate. We also checked the levels of liquid controlled drugs. We found that records relating to these indicated that there should have been more than we measured. Medications that require refrigeration are stored in a dedicated medicines fridge. However, this is not lockable as it should be. In addition, the temperature of this fridge is not being recorded to ensure that it is running within the range of temperatures at which these medicines should be stored. Dove Court DS0000021956.V370529.R01.S.doc Version 5.2 Page 14 Daily Life and Social Activities The intended outcomes for Standards 12 - 15 are: 12. 13. 14. 15. Service users find the lifestyle experienced in the home matches their expectations and preferences, and satisfies their social, cultural, religious and recreational interests and needs. Service users maintain contact with family/ friends/ representatives and the local community as they wish. Service users are helped to exercise choice and control over their lives. Service users receive a wholesome appealing balanced diet in pleasing surroundings at times convenient to them. The Commission considers all of the above key standards to be inspected. JUDGEMENT – we looked at outcomes for the following standard(s): 12, 13, 14 and 15. Quality in this outcome area is good. People live a lifestyle that suits them and like the food served and choices offered. This judgement has been made using available evidence including a visit to this service. EVIDENCE: We wanted to know if people have their social needs met. People told us that there are activities arranged such as bingo and quizzes. People say these are ‘OK’ and age appropriate, but they choose not to join in. Some people told us how much they enjoy going out on the recently purchased mini bus. They say they like to go out and about and ‘see what is going on’. On the day of this inspection a drive out had been arranged and people were being helped to get ready to go. Staff told us this trip had been offered to all the people living here and that five people were preparing to go. We asked what would happen if more people wanted to go than the bus could accommodate. Staff say they would easily arrange another outing. Dove Court DS0000021956.V370529.R01.S.doc Version 5.2 Page 15 Information given to us to us that everyone living in the home is British Christian. Staff told us that there used to be a religious service held in the home each week. However, they say this does not happen anymore because people do not want it. The lay preacher now phones each week to check if the service is wanted. We asked people living here what they thought of this. They told us that this arrangement suits. Some people told us how much they enjoy the hymns on the TV on Sunday mornings. We were told by one person that staff used to make sure that everyone that wanted to was bought together for this, but this has happened less consistently recently. We asked people about what choices they make. They say they make choices about ‘most things’, such as what they do with their days, what time they get up, what time to go to bed, what to eat, what to wear and how much support they get ‘because some days you feel like a bit extra’. Staff told us how important small choices are and that they try not to forget this. Staff also say that people tend to choose not to join in with the in house activities. They think this is because there is not enough on offer to stimulate them. They told us that this had been discussed at a staff meeting and as a result one member of staff is due to attend training specifically in relation to organising activities and stimulating interest. We asked people if they like the food. People told us that the quality of food is good but that the quality of cooking is variable. Staff told us that the meat comes from a local butcher and that the vegetables come from a local farmers market. Dry food shopping comes from the local supermarket. Staff also told us there is one cook who does not work full time. On the days she does not work, the carers take turns in cooking. Whilst the cook goes to each person during the morning and checks if people have any special requests for the day, care staff say they don’t always have time for this. Care staff say they have not had training in how to cook for older people but that this has been arranged. Staff say they could cater for special diets and do cook meals for those people who are diabetic. They say there is no living here who is a vegetarian or who needs a special diet because of their religion. On the day of this inspection, the cook was working. She was preparing a lunch whilst baking buns, a dessert and a cake. Everyone we spoke with said they enjoyed their lunch. We looked at the menus and found them to provide variety. However, when we spoke with people they say they sometimes order meals a week in advance and cannot always remember what they ordered and that this choice does not Dove Court DS0000021956.V370529.R01.S.doc Version 5.2 Page 16 always match with what they would like on the day. One person said ‘it’s nice to have some surprises but I wish I could order what I am going to eat on the same day’. Dove Court DS0000021956.V370529.R01.S.doc Version 5.2 Page 17 Complaints and Protection The intended outcomes for Standards 16 - 18 are: 16. 17. 18. Service users and their relatives and friends are confident that their complaints will be listened to, taken seriously and acted upon. Service users’ legal rights are protected. Service users are protected from abuse. The Commission considers Standards 16 and 18 the key standards to be. JUDGEMENT – we looked at outcomes for the following standard(s): 16 and 18. Quality in this outcome area is good. People living here are empowered to speak out, are listened to and are safe. This judgement has been made using available evidence including a visit to this service. EVIDENCE: We wanted to know if people are listened to. In surveys people told us that they know who to speak with and how to make a complaint. When we spoke with people living here they told us that the manager is easy to talk to if needed, but that a word with a carer about anything ‘usually results in the right thing being done’. Neither the home nor the commission has received complaints about this service. We also wanted to know if people here are safe. People told us they feel completely safe and that ‘staff are kind and caring’. We talked to staff about their understanding of abuse and what they would do if they were suspicious of or saw abuse. Staff say they have received training about this and that ‘not giving something they want like a boiled egg instead of a poached egg is abuse because it means you are not giving them the same rights as we have’. Staff were also aware of other types of abuse. Some knew the procedures to be followed if they were needed and some were less confident. However, they all say they would tell the manager or the owners, one of whom is always around. Dove Court DS0000021956.V370529.R01.S.doc Version 5.2 Page 18 However, on the day of this inspection none of these people were available and some staff did not know who they would contact. This might result in a delay in appropriate action being taken. Dove Court DS0000021956.V370529.R01.S.doc Version 5.2 Page 19 Environment The intended outcomes for Standards 19 – 26 are: 19. 20. 21. 22. 23. 24. 25. 26. Service users live in a safe, well-maintained environment. Service users have access to safe and comfortable indoor and outdoor communal facilities. Service users have sufficient and suitable lavatories and washing facilities. Service users have the specialist equipment they require to maximise their independence. Service users’ own rooms suit their needs. Service users live in safe, comfortable bedrooms with their own possessions around them. Service users live in safe, comfortable surroundings. The home is clean, pleasant and hygienic. The Commission considers Standards 19 and 26 the key standards to be inspected. JUDGEMENT – we looked at outcomes for the following standard(s): 19, 22 and 26. Quality in this outcome area is good. People live in a safe, clean and very homely environment. This judgement has been made using available evidence including a visit to this service. EVIDENCE: We wanted to know if people feel comfortable with the layout and décor of this home. People told us ‘it is lovely’, ‘so homely’ and ‘you can see for yourself, it’s like coming into our home’. In surveys people say the home is always clean and fresh. They add ‘a warm and comfortable home’ and ‘I am delighted to find the home always smells fresh and clean’. Staff say they like the home being like someone’s own home because it means that staff and visitors all behave as visitors and this helps them to be respectful. Dove Court DS0000021956.V370529.R01.S.doc Version 5.2 Page 20 During our case tracking, we looked at one bathroom from the perspective of someone who uses a wheelchair. We found that although the bathroom is quite large, it is difficult to manoeuvre a wheelchair, a person using the wheelchair and the two staff needed to help that person. We found that the bathroom does not have a shower. We talked to someone who uses a wheelchair about this and they told us that ‘having a bath is a lot of hassle for a few moments of pleasure’. The owner reports that he is currently in discussion with the local council about developments and changes he wants to make to the home. His plans include the addition of shower rooms. We wanted to check that the home is safe. Staff told us that regular fire drills take place and that the fire alarm is sounded weekly. We saw that fire exits are kept clear and that fire doors are kept open by magnetic holders that will close if the fire alarm is sounded. Staff say that the home has a lot of moving and handling equipment to suit people’s mobility needs. This includes a hoist and a stand aid. Staff say that if equipment is needed, that the owner is very quick to get it. Dove Court DS0000021956.V370529.R01.S.doc Version 5.2 Page 21 Staffing The intended outcomes for Standards 27 – 30 are: 27. 28. 29. 30. Service users’ needs are met by the numbers and skill mix of staff. Service users are in safe hands at all times. Service users are supported and protected by the home’s recruitment policy and practices. Staff are trained and competent to do their jobs. The Commission consider all the above are key standards to be inspected. JUDGEMENT – we looked at outcomes for the following standard(s): 27, 28, 29 and 30. Quality in this outcome area is good. People benefit from well trained, experienced, caring and well supported staff. Some improvements to the recruitment procedures are required to ensure that people are kept safe from inappropriate staff. This judgement has been made using available evidence including a visit to this service. EVIDENCE: We wanted to know if people living here are supported by appropriate staff. To check this we looked at how many staff are usually on duty and we looked at the training they receive. We found that there are usually 4 or 5 carers on duty in the morning, 3 carers in the afternoon and 1 waking and 1 sleeping carer at night. Duties such as cooking, laundry and ironing are also carried out by care staff. In the information provided by the service prior to the site visit we were told that all staff receive induction training and that more than 50 hold a National Vocational Qualification (NVQ) in care to Level 2 or above. In addition the service reports that a number of care staff are working towards gaining this and higher qualifications. Additional training has been provided and this Dove Court DS0000021956.V370529.R01.S.doc Version 5.2 Page 22 includes training about the Mental Capacity Act and about deprivation of liberty, which helps staff to keep up to date with changing practice. We looked at two staff files to check on recruitment procedures. We found that procedures relating to recruitment are not as robust as they should be. For example, one member of staff did not use their last two employers as referees. There may be good reasons for this but these reasons had not been explored and recorded. Each member of staff does undergo a check to see if they are on the list which excludes them from working with vulnerable adults (POVA list), and they have a full police check. However, records need to improve to clearly demonstrate that the POVA check has been carried out prior to that member of staff working in the home. We talked to people to gain their feedback about staff. They say they are always or usually available when needed, always there to ‘lend a listening ear’, ‘very caring’, ‘excellent’ and ‘nothing is too much trouble’. We talked to staff about their induction, training and the support they receive. They say that they had a very good induction. One member of staff told us that they weren’t allowed to work alone for about a week until they ‘got to know the home, the people living there and what to do’. Staff also told us that they feel well supported by the manager and by the owners. One member of staff told us in a survey ‘since working here I feel I have been supported and encouraged which has resulted in me doing my NVQ 3. My confidence has increased and I feel I can look after people well’. They say that communication in the home is ‘excellent’, that they always get a ‘handover’ at the beginning of each shift and that there is a diary where staff write to make sure that everyone has the information they need. Dove Court DS0000021956.V370529.R01.S.doc Version 5.2 Page 23 Management and Administration The intended outcomes for Standards 31 – 38 are: 31. 32. 33. 34. 35. 36. 37. 38. Service users live in a home which is run and managed by a person who is fit to be in charge, of good character and able to discharge his or her responsibilities fully. Service users benefit from the ethos, leadership and management approach of the home. The home is run in the best interests of service users. Service users are safeguarded by the accounting and financial procedures of the home. Service users’ financial interests are safeguarded. Staff are appropriately supervised. Service users’ rights and best interests are safeguarded by the home’s record keeping, policies and procedures. The health, safety and welfare of service users and staff are promoted and protected. The Commission considers Standards 31, 33, 35 and 38 the key standards to be inspected. JUDGEMENT – we looked at outcomes for the following standard(s): 31, 33, 35, 37 and 38. Quality in this outcome area is good. People who live here live in a home that is well managed and run in their best interests. The way that some monies and records are managed are presenting some risks. This judgement has been made using available evidence including a visit to this service. EVIDENCE: We wanted to know if the people who live here live in a home that is run in their best interests. Information given to us by the service shows that residents meetings are held at regular intervals (approximately every 3 months). In addition, residents are given the opportunity to complete resident review forms where they can Dove Court DS0000021956.V370529.R01.S.doc Version 5.2 Page 24 express their satisfaction/dissatisfaction with services provided. It also told us that the requirements and recommendations made at the last inspection had been addressed. We checked this when we visited and found this was the case. People told us ‘this is a home from home’, ‘the manager is marvellous, always ready to listen’ and ‘if you can’t be in your own home, this is a good second best’. The manager has recently successfully completed the Registered Managers Award (RMA) and another person is undertaking this. At least one of the coowners visits the home on most days, and one of the owners carries out audits of the care plans. Staff told us they are always kept up to date about the people living here and can ‘talk to our manager anytime’. They say ‘we have a strong staff team’ and that this helps them to work together to make sure people are happy. We looked at how the monies of the people we case tracked are managed. Two of these people (in line with the homes ethos of supporting independence) manage their own money, or are supported by family to manage their monies. One person is supported by the home. We found that these monies are kept securely and that there is limited access to this. We found that records recording payments in and payments out are made. However, we found that these have not been checked and signed for by two people as they should be in order to have a robust audit trail. All radiators are covered to prevent accidental scalding. Staff told us that any repairs needed are attended to quickly. The information provided by the home told us that regular maintenance and checks takes place to help ensure the home is kept in good repair and safe. Whilst walking around the home we noticed that one small lounge is being used by staff to store some records. These records are not being stored in a way that maintains confidentiality. In addition, the diary is being used in a way that means information about people is not being recorded confidentially. Dove Court DS0000021956.V370529.R01.S.doc Version 5.2 Page 25 SCORING OF OUTCOMES This page summarises the assessment of the extent to which the National Minimum Standards for Care Homes for Older People have been met and uses the following scale. The scale ranges from: 4 Standard Exceeded 2 Standard Almost Met (Commendable) (Minor Shortfalls) 3 Standard Met 1 Standard Not Met (No Shortfalls) (Major Shortfalls) “X” in the standard met box denotes standard not assessed on this occasion “N/A” in the standard met box denotes standard not applicable CHOICE OF HOME Standard No Score 1 2 3 4 5 6 ENVIRONMENT Standard No Score 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 x 3 3 x x N/A HEALTH AND PERSONAL CARE Standard No Score 7 2 8 3 9 2 10 3 11 x DAILY LIFE AND SOCIAL ACTIVITIES Standard No Score 12 3 13 3 14 3 15 3 COMPLAINTS AND PROTECTION Standard No Score 16 3 17 x 18 3 3 x x 3 x x x 3 STAFFING Standard No Score 27 3 28 3 29 2 30 3 MANAGEMENT AND ADMINISTRATION Standard No 31 32 33 34 35 36 37 38 Score 3 x 3 x 2 x 2 3 Dove Court DS0000021956.V370529.R01.S.doc Version 5.2 Page 26 Are there any outstanding requirements from the last inspection? No STATUTORY REQUIREMENTS This section sets out the actions, which must be taken so that the registered person/s meets the Care Standards Act 2000, Care Homes Regulations 2001 and the National Minimum Standards. The Registered Provider(s) must comply with the given timescales. No. 1. Standard OP7 Regulation 15 (1) (2) (b) Requirement Care plans must be kept up to date to include all decisions made with or by the person that plan relates to. This includes assessments relating to the selfadministration of medicines and the prevention of skin damage due to pressure. This will ensure that how care planning decisions have been made is clear and that it is clear that decisions have been made using all the available evidence. Medicines must be stored and handled safely. This includes making sure that medicines stored in the medicines fridge are stored safely and at the right temperature, and that the right amount of medicine is always dispensed. This will ensure that all medicines are handled safely and can be accounted for, and will ensure that people get the medicines they need as they are prescribed. Staff recruited to work at the home must undergo robust recruitment checks before they start work. This will help to DS0000021956.V370529.R01.S.doc Timescale for action 31/01/09 2. OP9 13 (2) 30/10/08 3. OP29 19 (1) (b) Schedule 2. 30/10/08 Dove Court Version 5.2 Page 27 ensure that only suitable staff work with the people living at the home. RECOMMENDATIONS These recommendations relate to National Minimum Standards and are seen as good practice for the Registered Provider/s to consider carrying out. No. 1. 2. 3. Refer to Standard OP12 OP15 OP18 Good Practice Recommendations A review should be carried out to ensure that people who want to can partake in group religious activities, such as joining in with Sunday hymns. The way that people choose what they eat should be reviewed to ensure that people make meaningful choices. Staff should be fully aware of, or have access to, the contact details of agencies to contact if they wanted to make a safeguarding alert (in the absence of management). Where people deposit money with the home for safe keeping, records should be kept and checked by two people to ensure that its management is completely safe. Information kept about each person living at the home should be kept separately and should not be stored in public areas. 4. 5. OP35 OP37 Dove Court DS0000021956.V370529.R01.S.doc Version 5.2 Page 28 Commission for Social Care Inspection South West Colston 33 33 Colston Avenue Bristol BS1 4UA National Enquiry Line: Telephone: 0845 015 0120 or 0191 233 3323 Textphone: 0845 015 2255 or 0191 233 3588 Email: enquiries@csci.gsi.gov.uk Web: www.csci.org.uk © This report is copyright Commission for Social Care Inspection (CSCI) and may only be used in its entirety. Extracts may not be used or reproduced without the express permission of CSCI Dove Court DS0000021956.V370529.R01.S.doc Version 5.2 Page 29 - Please note that this information is included on www.bestcarehome.co.uk under license from the regulator. Re-publishing this information is in breach of the terms of use of that website. Discrete codes and changes have been inserted throughout the textual data shown on the site that will provide incontrovertable proof of copying in the event this information is re-published on other websites. The policy of www.bestcarehome.co.uk is to use all legal avenues to pursue such offenders, including recovery of costs. You have been warned!

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