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Care Home: Exebank [Warren View]

  • Mudbank Lane Exmouth Devon EX8 3EG
  • Tel: 01392381430
  • Fax: 01392381441

Exebank is a detached purpose built Local Authority home, which provides care for up to 30 people over the age of 50 years, who may have a sensory or physical disability. The accommodation is arranged on two floors, each having two long corridors with bedrooms on both sides. There are two lounges, dining areas and communal bathroom facilities including a sluice room on each floor. All bedrooms are single, with 24 below 10 square metres. 8 bedrooms are approximately 14 square metres, and one room has an en suite facility. Each floor has a specialised purpose. On the ground floor respite care (for those whose carers need a break) and intermediate care are provided. On the first floor there is accommodation for physically frail service users who need help to improve their skills and level of independence. There is level access to the building and service users are able to enjoy the grounds, with pleasant lawns and patio area and outstanding views across the Exe estuary. A day centre shares the same building but has a separate entrance. Information received from the home indicates that there is no charge for those people admitted for Intermediate Care service. Those needing respite care are financially assessed. Services that people pay for independently include newspapers and magazines, hairdressing, continence aids and medical requisites, toiletries, chiropody, confectionery and stationery.

  • Latitude: 50.629001617432
    Longitude: -3.414999961853
  • Manager: Manager post vacant
  • Price p/w: -
  • UK
  • Total Capacity: 30
  • Type: Care home only
  • Provider: Devon County Council
  • Ownership: Local Authority
  • Care Home ID: 6186
Residents Needs:
Old age, not falling within any other category, Sensory impairment, Physical disability

Previous Inspections

This may not be the latest inspection for this service as we are having techinical problems updating from CQC - please check directly on the regulators website for the most recent report; bestcarehome hopes to be back to regular updates shortly.

For extracts, read the latest CQC inspection for Exebank [Warren View].

CARE HOMES FOR OLDER PEOPLE Exebank [Warren View] Mudbank Lane Exmouth Devon EX8 3EG Lead Inspector Michelle Oliver Unannounced Inspection 9th October 2007 09:30 X10015.doc Version 1.40 Page 1 The Commission for Social Care Inspection aims to: • • • • Put the people who use social care first Improve services and stamp out bad practice Be an expert voice on social care Practise what we preach in our own organisation Reader Information Document Purpose Author Audience Further copies from Copyright Inspection Report CSCI General Public 0870 240 7535 (telephone order line) This report is copyright Commission for Social Care Inspection (CSCI) and may only be used in its entirety. Extracts may not be used or reproduced without the express permission of CSCI www.csci.org.uk Internet address Exebank [Warren View] DS0000039189.V342824.R01.S.doc Version 5.2 Page 2 This is a report of an inspection to assess whether services are meeting the needs of people who use them. The legal basis for conducting inspections is the Care Standards Act 2000 and the relevant National Minimum Standards for this establishment are those for Care Homes for Older People. They can be found at www.dh.gov.uk or obtained from The Stationery Office (TSO) PO Box 29, St Crispins, Duke Street, Norwich, NR3 1GN. Tel: 0870 600 5522. Online ordering: www.tso.co.uk/bookshop This report is a public document. Extracts may not be used or reproduced without the prior permission of the Commission for Social Care Inspection. Exebank [Warren View] DS0000039189.V342824.R01.S.doc Version 5.2 Page 3 SERVICE INFORMATION Name of service Exebank [Warren View] Address Mudbank Lane Exmouth Devon EX8 3EG Telephone number Fax number Email address Provider Web address Name of registered provider(s)/company (if applicable) Name of registered manager (if applicable) Type of registration No. of places registered (if applicable) 01392 381430 01392 381441 angie.sharland@devon.gov.uk http/www.devon.gov.uk Devon County Council Position Vacant Care Home 30 Category(ies) of Old age, not falling within any other category registration, with number (28), Physical disability (2), Physical disability of places over 65 years of age (10), Sensory impairment (2), Sensory Impairment over 65 years of age (2) Exebank [Warren View] DS0000039189.V342824.R01.S.doc Version 5.2 Page 4 SERVICE INFORMATION Conditions of registration: 1. 2. This registration allows the admission of up to 2 persons aged 50 and over in the category of SI Sensory Impairment This registration allows the admission of up to 2 persons aged 50 and over in the category of PD Physical Disability 20th June 2006 Date of last inspection Brief Description of the Service: Exebank is a detached purpose built Local Authority home, which provides care for up to 30 people over the age of 50 years, who may have a sensory or physical disability. The accommodation is arranged on two floors, each having two long corridors with bedrooms on both sides. There are two lounges, dining areas and communal bathroom facilities including a sluice room on each floor. All bedrooms are single, with 24 below 10 square metres. 8 bedrooms are approximately 14 square metres, and one room has an en suite facility. Each floor has a specialised purpose. On the ground floor respite care (for those whose carers need a break) and intermediate care are provided. On the first floor there is accommodation for physically frail service users who need help to improve their skills and level of independence. There is level access to the building and service users are able to enjoy the grounds, with pleasant lawns and patio area and outstanding views across the Exe estuary. A day centre shares the same building but has a separate entrance. Information received from the home indicates that there is no charge for those people admitted for Intermediate Care service. Those needing respite care are financially assessed. Services that people pay for independently include newspapers and magazines, hairdressing, continence aids and medical requisites, toiletries, chiropody, confectionery and stationery. Exebank [Warren View] DS0000039189.V342824.R01.S.doc Version 5.2 Page 5 SUMMARY This is an overview of what the inspector found during the inspection. This unannounced inspection took place as part of the normal programme of inspection. One inspector carried out the site visit over the course of 7 hours. During this time we looked closely at the care and services offered to three people as a way of judging the standard of care and services generally. Where possible we spoke with these people in depth, looked at their care assessments and care plans closely, and spoke with staff about their knowledge and understanding of the plans. We looked at their bedrooms and we looked at the overall environment from their perspective. We also looked at recruitment records, staff traing record and other records. We spoke with approximately 15 others (of the 30 people living here),the manager, assistant managers, administrative assistants and carers. We looked around the building at all communal areas and saw many of the bedrooms. We looked at other records including medication, staffing, accident and incident reports, training, fire safety and recruitment and complaints. Prior to the visit to the home we sent surveys to various people asking for feedback and comments. We sent surveys to people who live here to relatives and to health and social care professionals who attend people living here. We received responses from 9 staff and 2 health care professionals.. Their feedback and comments are included in the report. Other information given to the commission throughout the year has been taken into account. In addition, and before we visited the home, the manager provided information about the management of the home and their own assessment of what the home does well and what they plan to improve upon. What the service does well: People receive good information about the home on admission and benefit from good admission practice, which ensures that the home is able to meet their needs. However, written information has not been kept up to date. [See what they could do better] People spoken to during the inspection were full of praise for the rehabilitation and recuperative services provided. They said they felt the staff are giving them all the help they need in order to return to their homes. They praised the skills of the staff team, including care staff, occupational therapists and physiotherapists. Exebank [Warren View] DS0000039189.V342824.R01.S.doc Version 5.2 Page 6 Individual care plans have been developed for all people when they move to the home. Improvement is needed to ensure consistent information is recorded. [See what they could do better] Medication is well managed by staff that have been well trained. People are encouraged and supported to look after their own medicines if they wish and are able. People privacy and dignity are met and promoted by the staff and management at the home. People confirmed that they are treated with respect and their privacy is protected. Social needs and meals are generally well managed. A varied balanced diet is provided and served in a pleasant atmosphere. People are encouraged to maintain contact with their families or friends as they wish and to take control of their lives during their stay at Exebank. We spoke to two visitors during the inspection. Both confirmed that they have always been made welcome whenever they visit, and said that the staff and managers were friendly and approachable. The focus of the home is to encourage independence so that people can return to live independently and successfully in their own homes. People are encouraged to exercise choice over all aspects of their daily lives. All people spoken to were very satisfied with the standard of food at the home. One said the food is “excellent”. The home has a satisfactory complaints process. We spoke to 16 people during this inspection and all said they would feel comfortable making a complaint, as they were sure that all staff at the home would take issues seriously. People benefit from living in a home that is very clean, fresh and where hygiene is well managed. The number of staff on duty throughout the day and night meets peoples’ personal and health needs and people benefit from being cared for by staff who are qualified and competent. People benefit from living in a well managed home that is working hard towards trying to make sure the home is run in their best interests. What has improved since the last inspection? An assessment of individual care needs is undertaken for all people admitted for recuperation or rehabilitation before they move to the home. Assessments are generally undertaken by health care professionals before a person is Exebank [Warren View] DS0000039189.V342824.R01.S.doc Version 5.2 Page 7 discharged from hospital, not by staff at Exebank, and reassessed within 24 hours of arrival by Exebank staff. . Plans of care have improved since the last inspection. Indivdual care plans, which are reviewed weekly, are in place for all people who use the services addressing health and personal care needs. The home has developed a procedure to ensure that the date beyond which opened creams/ ointments are used is clearly identifiable by all staff at the home. What they could do better: Please contact the provider for advice of actions taken in response to this inspection. The report of this inspection is available from enquiries@csci.gsi.gov.uk or by contacting your local CSCI office. The summary of this inspection report can be made available in other formats on request. Exebank [Warren View] DS0000039189.V342824.R01.S.doc Version 5.2 Page 8 DETAILS OF INSPECTOR FINDINGS CONTENTS Choice of Home (Standards 1–6) Health and Personal Care (Standards 7-11) Daily Life and Social Activities (Standards 12-15) Complaints and Protection (Standards 16-18) Environment (Standards 19-26) Staffing (Standards 27-30) Management and Administration (Standards 31-38) Scoring of Outcomes Statutory Requirements Identified During the Inspection Exebank [Warren View] DS0000039189.V342824.R01.S.doc Version 5.2 Page 9 Choice of Home The intended outcomes for Standards 1 – 6 are: 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. Prospective service users have the information they need to make an informed choice about where to live. Each service user has a written contract/ statement of terms and conditions with the home. No service user moves into the home without having had his/her needs assessed and been assured that these will be met. Service users and their representatives know that the home they enter will meet their needs. Prospective service users and their relatives and friends have an opportunity to visit and assess the quality, facilities and suitability of the home. Service users assessed and referred solely for intermediate care are helped to maximise their independence and return home. The Commission considers Standards 3 and 6 the key standards to be inspected. JUDGEMENT – we looked at outcomes for the following standard(s): 1, 3 &6. Quality in this outcome area is good. This judgement has been made using available evidence including a visit to this service. Residents receive good information about the home on admission and benefit from good admission practice, which ensures that the home is able to meet their needs. However, written information has not been kept up to date. Residents admitted for intermediate care are helped to maximise their independence and return home. EVIDENCE: The home’s Statement of Purpose does not currently include up to date information. An information folder, containing a range of useful and easy to read information about the home, is provided in all individual rooms. Some of the information provided is not up to date. The manager said that this is due to be undertaken. Exebank [Warren View] DS0000039189.V342824.R01.S.doc Version 5.2 Page 10 Residents are generally admitted to the home for recuperation, rehabilitation or a period of respite, to allow their carers a period of rest. An assessment of individual care needs is undertaken for all people admitted for recuperation or rehabilitation before they move to the home. Assessments are generally undertaken by health care professionals before a person is discharged from hospital, not by staff at Exebank, and reassessed within 24 hours of arrival by Exebank staff. Before a person is admitted to the home, a copy of an assessment of a person’s health and social care needs is forwarded to a coordinator at the home. The information is discussed within the enablement team and is then passed to a member of the management team. A decision is then made as to whether the assessed needs can be met by the staff, equipment, adaptations and environment at Exebank. Individual plans of care are developed based upon the assessments. As part of this inspection three peoples files were looked at in detail. All included pre admission assessments, which were comprehensive, and included sufficient information on which individual plans of care to be followed by staff had been written. People spoken to during the inspection were full of praise for the rehabilitation and recuperative services provided. They said they felt the staff are giving them all the help they need in order to return to their homes. They praised the skills of the staff team, including care staff, occupational therapists and physiotherapists. The home has accommodation and equipment to assist people to regain mobility and a range of activities and exercises are provided to assist mobility and aid recovery. Exebank [Warren View] DS0000039189.V342824.R01.S.doc Version 5.2 Page 11 Health and Personal Care The intended outcomes for Standards 7 – 11 are: 7. 8. 9. 10. 11. The service user’s health, personal and social care needs are set out in an individual plan of care. Service users’ health care needs are fully met. Service users, where appropriate, are responsible for their own medication, and are protected by the home’s policies and procedures for dealing with medicines. Service users feel they are treated with respect and their right to privacy is upheld. Service users are assured that at the time of their death, staff will treat them and their family with care, sensitivity and respect. The Commission considers Standards 7, 8, 9 and 10 the key standards to be inspected. JUDGEMENT – we looked at outcomes for the following standard(s): OP 7, 8, 9 & 10. Quality in this outcome area is good. This judgement has been made using available evidence including a visit to this service. Individual care plans have been developed for all people when they move to the home. Improvement is needed to ensure consistent information is recorded. Medication is well managed. Residents’ privacy and dignity are met and promoted by the staff and management at the home. EVIDENCE: Plans of care have improved since the last inspection. Indivdual care plans, which are reviewed weekly, are in place for all people who use the services addressing health and personal care needs. Exebank [Warren View] DS0000039189.V342824.R01.S.doc Version 5.2 Page 12 We looked at three people’s care plans and all showed that appropriate assessments are undertaken in relation to the risk of people developing pressure sores and in relation to how much nutritional support the person might need. These assessments are followed up with plans of action and are regularly reviewed with the individual’s involvement. Care plans for people admitted for rehabilitation or for respite care are generally comprehensive and provide information to enable staff to meet identified care needs. However, some of the information recorded in individual plans was not consistent. For instance information recorded on an “Exebank respite/ rehabilitation profile”, was not the same as that recorded on the “admissions procedure” document. Information on one stated the person was fully mobile when it had been recorded that the person needed assistance and a walking frame. Not all documents had been signed and dated. This potentially puts people at risk of their needs not being clearly identified or met. We noted several records of fluid and food intake posted on a notice board in one of the dining rooms. This is because some people need either a restricted fluid intake or need to be encouraged to take a normal fluid intake. The records looked at were incomplete. Instructions written on one chart stated the person “Must have 3 pints of fluid in 24 hours”. The recordings of the drinks taken by the person indicated that their intake had been well below 3 pints. There was no indication of the outcome if the recommended fluid intake was not achieved. This potentially puts people at risk of their assessed health needs not being fully met. [refer to standard 38] People are encouraged and supported to look after their own medicines and several were at the time of this inspection. People are provided with lockable facilities to ensure safe storage of their medication. Medicines kept on residents’ behalf are stored safely and only staff who have undertaken specific training in safe handling of medicines manage them. People confirmed that they are treated with respect and their privacy is protected. Care staff confirmed this when telling us about the home’s privacy and dignity policy, when seen knocking before entering peoples’ rooms and when seen being discreet in offering to provide personal care or assistance. People have direct access to a therapy team and a nurse during weekdays. People spoken to during this visit were very satisfied with the level of care given by staff at the home and with the assistance, encouragement and support given to maximise their independence and regain daily living skills. Exebank [Warren View] DS0000039189.V342824.R01.S.doc Version 5.2 Page 13 Daily Life and Social Activities The intended outcomes for Standards 12 - 15 are: 12. 13. 14. 15. Service users find the lifestyle experienced in the home matches their expectations and preferences, and satisfies their social, cultural, religious and recreational interests and needs. Service users maintain contact with family/ friends/ representatives and the local community as they wish. Service users are helped to exercise choice and control over their lives. Service users receive a wholesome appealing balanced diet in pleasing surroundings at times convenient to them. The Commission considers all of the above key standards to be inspected. JUDGEMENT – we looked at outcomes for the following standard(s): 12, 13, 14 & 15. Quality in this outcome area is good. This judgement has been made using available evidence including a visit to this service. Social needs and meals are generally well managed. A varied balanced diet is provided and served in a pleasant atmosphere. People are encouraged to maintain contact with their families or friends as they wish and to take control of their lives during their stay at Exebank. EVIDENCE: People admitted for rehabilitation have a timetable of activities and exercises designed to increase mobility. Some of these sessions will be carried out with a physiotherapist, and some will be carried out with the care staff. Exercise classes are provided to increase their general well being. People spoke about routines, including exercises, planned to restore their health, being regularly carried out. The home does not currently employ an activities coordinator. Daily activities are organised by care staff on a daily basis according to how busy they are. Activities provided include individual therapy sessions, daily exercise sessions, occasional sing a longs, quizzes, bingo, donkey visits and musicians. People Exebank [Warren View] DS0000039189.V342824.R01.S.doc Version 5.2 Page 14 are encouraged and supported to maintain their religious beliefs and a Communion service is held monthly at the home. During this visit several people were enjoying chatting to each other, reading newspapers and books, watching TV programmes and listening to music of their choice. One person said “one of the nicest things about Exebank is making friends and talking” another said “ I just like looking out at the lovely views,which change with the tides”. The inspector spoke to two visitors during the inspection. Both confirmed that they have always been made welcome whenever they visit, and said that the staff and managers were friendly and approachable. The home encourages people to go out and about in the local community if they are able. During this inspection one person told staff they were “ going down the road to get my paper”. The focus of the home is to encourage independence so that people can return to live independently and successfully in their own homes. Service users are encouraged to exercise choice over all aspects of their daily lives, including self administration of medicines, choice of food, daily activities. Service users confirmed that they are encouraged to lead their lives as they wish, with help from staff as and when requested. Information received before this inspection stated that the home has gained a gold award from a recent annual quality audit relating to catering. When people are admiited to the home they have direct contact with cook within 48 hours to discuss their individual dietary needs. Two dining rooms are provided on each floor, both of which are homely and comfortable. The dining tables were attractively laid with pretty tablecloths and napkins. A kitchenette is also available where people may prepare their own meal if they choose. People are encouraged and supported to maintain their independence, however for those needing assistance this is provided in a sensitive way. The home will also provide special diets and individual requests. The meal seen during this inspection was tasty, well cooked, very attractively presented, with portions to suit individuals. A choice of meal is offered at both main meals. Specialist diets are well catered for at Exebank. All people spoken to were very satisfied with the standard of food at the home. One said the food is “excellent”. Exebank [Warren View] DS0000039189.V342824.R01.S.doc Version 5.2 Page 15 Complaints and Protection The intended outcomes for Standards 16 - 18 are: 16. 17. 18. Service users and their relatives and friends are confident that their complaints will be listened to, taken seriously and acted upon. Service users’ legal rights are protected. Service users are protected from abuse. The Commission considers Standards 16 and 18 the key standards to be. JUDGEMENT – we looked at outcomes for the following standard(s): 16 & 18 Quality in this outcome area is good. This judgement has been made using available evidence including a visit to this service. The home has a satisfactory complaints process. Staff have a good knowledge and understanding of the forms of abuse thereby ensuring that residents are protected at the home. EVIDENCE: The home’s complaints procedure is displayed in the entrance hallway and a copy is included in the welcome folder that is supplied in individual rooms. We spoke to 16 people during this inspection and all said they would feel comfortable making a complaint, as they were sure that all staff at the home would take issues seriously. Record seen during the inspection showed that the home has dealt with six complaints since the last inspection. The home acted promptly and appropriately in all cases and the outcomes were satisfactory. There was nothing to suggest that residents are anything other than well cared for at Exebank. People said “staff were very kind and friendly”. Staff have undertaken Adult Protection training since the last inspection and were Exebank [Warren View] DS0000039189.V342824.R01.S.doc Version 5.2 Page 16 able to discuss different forms of abuse. They all said that they would not hesitate to report any suspicion of poor practice. Exebank [Warren View] DS0000039189.V342824.R01.S.doc Version 5.2 Page 17 Environment The intended outcomes for Standards 19 – 26 are: 19. 20. 21. 22. 23. 24. 25. 26. Service users live in a safe, well-maintained environment. Service users have access to safe and comfortable indoor and outdoor communal facilities. Service users have sufficient and suitable lavatories and washing facilities. Service users have the specialist equipment they require to maximise their independence. Service users’ own rooms suit their needs. Service users live in safe, comfortable bedrooms with their own possessions around them. Service users live in safe, comfortable surroundings. The home is clean, pleasant and hygienic. The Commission considers Standards 19 and 26 the key standards to be inspected. JUDGEMENT – we looked at outcomes for the following standard(s): 19 & 26 Quality in this outcome area is good. This judgement has been made using available evidence including a visit to this service. People benefit from living in a home that is very clean, fresh and where hygiene is well managed. EVIDENCE: The home pays exceptional attention to cleanliness and the prevention of infection, and encourages visitors to do the same. A good supply of protective clothing, hand washing facilities and hand cleansing gel are provided throughout the home for staff and visitors. Staff spoke about precautions taken to prevent spread of infection, confirmed that equipment is always available and were aware of, and understood, the home’s health and safety policy. The home was spotlessly clean at the time of this inspection and information about cleanliness was displayed for all to read. Exebank [Warren View] DS0000039189.V342824.R01.S.doc Version 5.2 Page 18 People spoken to say “the home is always clean and fresh” and “the domestics work very hard and have high standards”. A maintenance person is employed and the home is well maintained and decorated. A maintenance book is kept in an office and staff write in any faults or minor repairs that need attention. The maintenance person looks at this book daily and records showed action is taken promptly. The home also employs a laundry person. The laundry was clean and tidy. Clothes were being taken to peoples’ rooms during this visit and all were well ironed and presented. People praised the quality of the laundering and the speed at which it is done. Exebank [Warren View] DS0000039189.V342824.R01.S.doc Version 5.2 Page 19 Staffing The intended outcomes for Standards 27 – 30 are: 27. 28. 29. 30. Service users’ needs are met by the numbers and skill mix of staff. Service users are in safe hands at all times. Service users are supported and protected by the home’s recruitment policy and practices. Staff are trained and competent to do their jobs. The Commission consider all the above are key standards to be inspected. JUDGEMENT – we looked at outcomes for the following standard(s): 27,28,29 &30. Quality in this outcome area is good. This judgement has been made using available evidence including a visit to this service. The number of staff on duty throughout the day and night meets peoples’ personal and health needs. People benefit from being cared for by staff who are qualified and competent and protected by the home’s robust recruitment practice. EVIDENCE: The number of staff on duty throughout the day and night meets peoples’ personal and health needs. The manager aims to have 4 carers on duty between 7.30am-2pm, 2 carers between 2pm-4.30pm, 3 carers between 4.30-9.30 on each of the two floors and 2 carers and a night care officer between 8pm-8am. The manager and an assistant manager are on duty during the day. People spoken to said that their needs were met in a timely way. During this inspection we saw staff responding to peoples’ bells swiftly throughout the day. One person said “staff were always busy but nothing was ever too much trouble for them” and “all staff are polite and cheerful”. Exebank [Warren View] DS0000039189.V342824.R01.S.doc Version 5.2 Page 20 In questionnaires returned before this inspection 3 carers commented “not enough staff” and “ It would be nice to have time to spend with the service user one to one other than just getting them up when we are busy”. The manager said the home has recently introduced a “keyworker “system. This means that carers will give person centred care for a certain number of identified people. When a person is admitted they will be introduced to their “keyworker” and will be able to refer to this person. The keyworker will spend time with the person, carry out personal and social care needs, work closely with members of the rehabilitation team, other health care professionals and the person’s family or representatives. During this inspection a carer described making an appointment with a persons chiropractor for them. This system does not mean that other staff will not be able to care for people when their keyworker may not be available. A comprehensive hand over is given to all staff when they come on duty. This is to ensure that all staff are aware of up to date information about all people currently living at the home. We took part in a handover during this inspection and the quality of the information given to staff was excellent. For instance a person who had previously lived at the home had returned after a number of weeks spent in hospital. Details relating to health and social care needs were discussed with particular attention to a change in nutritional needs since the person had been in hospital. A manager discussed the way in which they had discussed a persons issues relating to any problems they may have with their medication when discharged. The manager advised contacting a pharmacist, reading leaflets that are included in medicine packs and also suggested the person using the web site for additional information, all of which reassured the person. Weekly meetings are held at the home involving the manager, social workers, members of the rehabilitation team, a registered nurse who works at the home and other health care professionals who may be involved in people’s care. During this meeting individuals’ progress is discussed and action plans are drawn up. The reviewed care plans are then discussed with individuals in private. The home is committed to providing training and since the last inspection training undertaken includes medication, fire safety, manual handling, risk assessment and Protection of Vulnerable Adults. Individual records are kept of training undertaken by staff ensuring that updates or gaps in training can be easily identified. Staff at the home are eager to undertake training and were able to highlight their individual needs during this visit. This will protect people by ensuring that they are cared for by competent staff. Exebank [Warren View] DS0000039189.V342824.R01.S.doc Version 5.2 Page 21 Three staff recruitment files were looked at during this visit. The documentation was consistent with evidence of a safe and robust recruitment process being carried out before a person is employed at Exebank. This protects residents, as only people who have undergone this robust procedure will be employed to work at their home. All newly employed staff undergo a period of training when they start working at the home. This period of induction consists of 2-.5 days formal training plus in house training. The time taken to complete this training will depend on past experience and individual ability. Exebank [Warren View] DS0000039189.V342824.R01.S.doc Version 5.2 Page 22 Management and Administration The intended outcomes for Standards 31 – 38 are: 31. 32. 33. 34. 35. 36. 37. 38. Service users live in a home which is run and managed by a person who is fit to be in charge, of good character and able to discharge his or her responsibilities fully. Service users benefit from the ethos, leadership and management approach of the home. The home is run in the best interests of service users. Service users are safeguarded by the accounting and financial procedures of the home. Service users’ financial interests are safeguarded. Staff are appropriately supervised. Service users’ rights and best interests are safeguarded by the home’s record keeping, policies and procedures. The health, safety and welfare of service users and staff are promoted and protected. The Commission considers Standards 31, 33, 35 and 38 the key standards to be inspected. JUDGEMENT – we looked at outcomes for the following standard(s): 31,33, 35 & 38. Quality in this outcome area is good. This judgement has been made using available evidence including a visit to this service. The home is well managed and run in the bet interest of people that live there. The home ensures that people’s health and safety are properly attended to. Attention is needed to ensure that some records are accurate and up to date. EVIDENCE: Exebank does not currently have a registered manager, but has recently recruited a person who will be applying to the Commission to be registered as manager of the home. Exebank [Warren View] DS0000039189.V342824.R01.S.doc Version 5.2 Page 23 A registered manager from another Devon County Council service has been responsible for the running of the home for several months. The quality of the service provided by the home is checked using regular quality survey questionnaires, results of which are audited by the manager and providers, the Local Authority. Staff and residents’ meetings are held, both providing an opportunity for the manager to give and receive information about the home. Management seek feedback during peoples stay ensuring that any issues iare addressed ,recorded and action taken as required People are also given questionnaires when they are discharged from Exebank. As a result of questionnaires wall clocks have been fitted in all bedrooms and additional time is spent with people to discuss their stay on day of discharge. This ensures that standards of health, social care and welfare needs will be maintained and a programme of continuing improvement developed at the home. People will benefit by being assured that the home is working towards delivering high standards of care. All records seen were securely stored and would be made available to people living at the home, or their representative with their consent. However, some daily records were not up to date. We saw records of fluid intake for some people that were inaccurate and not up to date. This potentially compromises their health needs being fully met. Records show that staff regularly undertake training in the prevention of fire and fire alarms have been carried out regularly. An assessment of identified hazards and associated risk relating to the environment, including fire hazards, has been undertaken which contribute towards ensuring that Exebank is a safe place to live. Exebank [Warren View] DS0000039189.V342824.R01.S.doc Version 5.2 Page 24 SCORING OF OUTCOMES This page summarises the assessment of the extent to which the National Minimum Standards for Care Homes for Older People have been met and uses the following scale. The scale ranges from: 4 Standard Exceeded 2 Standard Almost Met (Commendable) (Minor Shortfalls) 3 Standard Met 1 Standard Not Met (No Shortfalls) (Major Shortfalls) “X” in the standard met box denotes standard not assessed on this occasion “N/A” in the standard met box denotes standard not applicable CHOICE OF HOME Standard No Score 1 2 3 4 5 6 ENVIRONMENT Standard No Score 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 2 X 3 X X 3 HEALTH AND PERSONAL CARE Standard No Score 7 3 8 X 9 3 10 3 11 X DAILY LIFE AND SOCIAL ACTIVITIES Standard No Score 12 3 13 3 14 3 15 3 COMPLAINTS AND PROTECTION Standard No Score 16 3 17 X 18 3 4 X X X X X X 3 STAFFING Standard No Score 27 3 28 3 29 3 30 3 MANAGEMENT AND ADMINISTRATION Standard No 31 32 33 34 35 36 37 38 Score 3 X 3 X 3 X X 3 Exebank [Warren View] DS0000039189.V342824.R01.S.doc Version 5.2 Page 25 Are there any outstanding requirements from the last inspection? STATUTORY REQUIREMENTS This section sets out the actions, which must be taken so that the registered person/s meets the Care Standards Act 2000, Care Homes Regulations 2001 and the National Minimum Standards. The Registered Provider(s) must comply with the given timescales. No. Standard Regulation Requirement Timescale for action RECOMMENDATIONS These recommendations relate to National Minimum Standards and are seen as good practice for the Registered Provider/s to consider carrying out. No. 1. 2. Refer to Standard OP1 OP7 Good Practice Recommendations The home’s statement of Purpose and information in Service Users’ Guide needs to be amended to provide up to date information to people. Care should be taken to ensure that information recorded in individual plans of care is consistent and enables peoples care needs to be met. Exebank [Warren View] DS0000039189.V342824.R01.S.doc Version 5.2 Page 26 Commission for Social Care Inspection Ashburton Office Unit D1 Linhay Business Park Ashburton TQ13 7UP National Enquiry Line: Telephone: 0845 015 0120 or 0191 233 3323 Textphone: 0845 015 2255 or 0191 233 3588 Email: enquiries@csci.gsi.gov.uk Web: www.csci.org.uk © This report is copyright Commission for Social Care Inspection (CSCI) and may only be used in its entirety. Extracts may not be used or reproduced without the express permission of CSCI Exebank [Warren View] DS0000039189.V342824.R01.S.doc Version 5.2 Page 27 - Please note that this information is included on www.bestcarehome.co.uk under license from the regulator. Re-publishing this information is in breach of the terms of use of that website. Discrete codes and changes have been inserted throughout the textual data shown on the site that will provide incontrovertable proof of copying in the event this information is re-published on other websites. 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