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Care Home: Swanhouse

  • 4 Swanland Avenue Bridlington East Yorkshire YO15 2HH
  • Tel: 01262678805
  • Fax: 01262678805
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Swanhouse is a care home that is registered to provide care and accommodation for a maximum of three people of either sex who have a learning disability. The home is owned and operated by the registered providers, who also live in the property. The home endeavours to promote a person`s independence, develop their life skills and enable them to build self-esteem and confidence. The home is situated in the centre of Bridlington close to many local amenities, such as Leisure World, the Spa Theatre and shopping facilities, as well as local transport facilities. The fee paid by individuals is 360.15 pounds per week, with additional charges for chiropody, hairdressing, toiletries and extra holidays (one holiday per year is paid for by the registered providers). Information about the home is provided to people using the service and others in the home`s statement of purpose and service user guide. The care home itself occupies a large period property, which is laid out on two floors and provides people living in the home with a comfortable homely environment. There are three single rooms, two 3 Over 65 0 having en-suite facilities and the other being situated next to the communal bathroom. There is a small secure garden to the rear of the property.

Residents Needs:
Learning disability

Latest Inspection

This is the latest available inspection report for this service, carried out on 8th January 2009. CSCI found this care home to be providing an Excellent service.

The inspector made no statutory requirements on the home as a result of this inspection and there were no outstanding actions from the previous inspection report.

For extracts, read the latest CQC inspection for Swanhouse.

What the care home does well The home looks after people well; the staff have the skills to manage the changing needs of individuals whilst making sure they remain as independant as possible. Records are well written and are presented in a way that people with learning disabilities can understand. The individual files put together by people living in the home are an excellent record of their achievements and people expressed pride in these. People are encouraged and supported to take part in various leisure activities both at home, at the day centre and within the local community. Responsible risk taking is encouraged. Staff are well trained and say that they feel well supported by the registered provider/manager. The home is a comfortable, clean, welcoming and safe place to live. What has improved since the last inspection? The manager and staff have improved on the standards of care and continue to move the service forward. There was only one recommendation in the last report (January 2007) and this has been met. What the care home could do better: This service provides people with individualised care packages that meet their needs, wishes and choices, within a family orientated setting that encourages individuals to be as independent as possible. The service continues to look at what people need and makes changes to achieve the best possible outcomes for individuals. There are no requirements or recommendations made in this report as the service has met four standards and excelled in four others. We would like to thank everyone who completed a survey or spoke to us during this visit. Your comments are very important to us and ensure this report includes the views of people who use the service or work within it. Inspecting for better lives Key inspection report Care homes for adults (18-65 years) Name: Address: Swanhouse 4 Swanland Avenue Bridlington East Yorkshire YO15 2HH     The quality rating for this care home is:   three star excellent service A quality rating is our assessment of how well a care home, agency or scheme is meeting the needs of the people who use it. We give a quality rating following a full assessment of the service. We call this a ‘key’ inspection. Lead inspector: Eileen Engelmann     Date: 0 8 0 1 2 0 0 9 This is a report of an inspection where we looked at how well this care home is meeting the needs of people who use it. There is a summary of what we think this service does well, what they have improved on and, where it applies, what they need to do better. We use the national minimum standards to describe the outcomes that people should experience. National minimum standards are written by the Department of Health for each type of care service. After the summary there is more detail about our findings. The following table explains what you will see under each outcome area. Outcome area (for example Choice of home) These are the outcomes that people staying in care homes should experience. the things that people have said are important to them: They reflect This box tells you the outcomes that we will always inspect against when we do a key inspection. This box tells you any additional outcomes that we may inspect against when we do a key inspection. This is what people staying in this care home experience: Judgement: This box tells you our opinion of what we have looked at in this outcome area. We will say whether it is excellent, good, adequate or poor. Evidence: This box describes the information we used to come to our judgement. Copies of the National Minimum Standards – Care Homes for Adults (18-65 years) can be found at www.dh.gov.uk or bought from The Stationery Office (TSO) PO Box 29, St Crispins, Duke Street, Norwich, NR3 1GN. Tel: 0870 600 5522. Online ordering from the Stationery Office is also available: www.tso.co.uk/bookshop The Commission for Social Care Inspection aims to: · · · · Put the people who use social care first Improve services and stamp out bad practice Be an expert voice on social care Practise what we preach in our own organisation Our duty to regulate social care services is set out in the Care Standards Act 2000. Care Homes for Adults (18-65 years) Page 2 of 29 Reader Information Document Purpose Author Audience Further copies from Copyright Inspection report CSCI General public 0870 240 7535 (telephone order line) Copyright © (2009) Commission for Social Care Inspection (CSCI). This publication may be reproduced in whole or in part, free of charge, in any format or medium provided that it is not used for commercial gain. This consent is subject to the material being reproduced accurately and on proviso that it is not used in a derogatory manner or misleading context. The material should be acknowledged as CSCI copyright, with the title and date of publication of the document specified. www.csci.org.uk Internet address Care Homes for Adults (18-65 years) Page 3 of 29 Information about the care home Name of care home: Address: Swanhouse 4 Swanland Avenue Bridlington East Yorkshire YO15 2HH 01262678805 F/P01262678805 susanropero@hotmail.com Telephone number: Fax number: Email address: Provider web address: Name of registered provider(s): Name of registered manager (if applicable) Mrs Susan Ropero Type of registration: Number of places registered: Mr John Paul Ropero,Mrs Susan Ropero care home 3 Conditions of registration: Category(ies) : Number of places (if applicable): Under 65 learning disability Additional conditions: Date of last inspection Brief description of the care home Swanhouse is a care home that is registered to provide care and accommodation for a maximum of three people of either sex who have a learning disability. The home is owned and operated by the registered providers, who also live in the property. The home endeavours to promote a persons independence, develop their life skills and enable them to build self-esteem and confidence. The home is situated in the centre of Bridlington close to many local amenities, such as Leisure World, the Spa Theatre and shopping facilities, as well as local transport facilities. The fee paid by individuals is 360.15 pounds per week, with additional charges for chiropody, hairdressing, toiletries and extra holidays (one holiday per year is paid for by the registered providers). Information about the home is provided to people using the service and others in the homes statement of purpose and service user guide. The care home itself occupies a large period property, which is laid out on two floors and provides people living in the home with a comfortable homely environment. There are three single rooms, two Care Homes for Adults (18-65 years) Page 4 of 29 3 Over 65 0 Brief description of the care home having en-suite facilities and the other being situated next to the communal bathroom. There is a small secure garden to the rear of the property. Care Homes for Adults (18-65 years) Page 5 of 29 Summary This is an overview of what we found during the inspection. The quality rating for this care home is: Our judgement for each outcome: three star excellent service Choice of home Individual needs and choices Lifestyle Personal and healthcare support Concerns, complaints and protection Environment Staffing Conduct and management of the home peterchart Poor Adequate Good Excellent How we did our inspection: The quality rating for this service is 3 stars. This means that the people who use this service experience excellent quality outcomes. Information has been gathered from a number of different sources over the past 24 months since the service had its last key visit from the Commission for Social Care Inspection, this has been analysed and used with information from this visit to reach the outcomes of this report. In October 2007 we completed an Annual Service Review (ASR). We only do an annual service review for good or excellent services that have not had a key inspection in the last year. An ASR is part of our regulatory activity and is an assessment of our Care Homes for Adults (18-65 years) Page 6 of 29 current knowledge of a service rather than an inspection. The published review is a result of the assessment and does not come from our power to enter and inspect a service. This unannounced visit was carried out over one day with the manager, staff and people using the service. The visit included a tour of the premises, examination of staff and peoples files, and records relating to the service. Informal chats with staff and people living in the home took place during this visit; their comments have been included in this report. Questionnaires were sent out to people living in the home and staff. Their written response to these was good. We received 1 from staff (100 ) and 3 from people using the service (100 ). The manager completed an Annual Quality Assurance Assessment and returned this to us within the given timescale. We have reviewed our practice when making requirements, to improve national consistency. Some requirements from previous inspection reports may have been deleted or carried forward into this report as recommendations - but only when it is considered that people who use services are not being put at significant risk of harm. In future, if a requirement is repeated, it is likely that enforcement action will be taken. What the care home does well: What has improved since the last inspection? What they could do better: If you want to know what action the person responsible for this care home is taking following this report, you can contact them using the details set out on page 4. The report of this inspection is available from our website www.csci.org.uk. You can get printed copies from enquiries@csci.gsi.gov.uk or by telephoning our order line –0870 240 7535. Care Homes for Adults (18-65 years) Page 8 of 29 Details of our findings Contents Choice of home (standards 1 - 5) Individual needs and choices (standards 6-10) Lifestyle (standards 11 - 17) Personal and healthcare support (standards 18 - 21) Concerns, complaints and protection (standards 22 - 23) Environment (standards 24 - 30) Staffing (standards 31 - 36) Conduct and management of the home (standards 37 - 43) Outstanding statutory requirements Requirements and recommendations from this inspection Care Homes for Adults (18-65 years) Page 9 of 29 Choice of home These are the outcomes that people staying in care homes should experience. They reflect the things that people have said are important to them: People are confident that the care home can support them. This is because there is an accurate assessment of their needs that they, or people close to them, have been involved in. This tells the home all about them, what they hope for and want to achieve, and the support they need. People can decide whether the care home can meet their support and accommodation needs. This is because they, and people close to them, can visit the home and get full, clear, accurate and up to date information. If they decide to stay in the home they know about their rights and responsibilities because there is an easy to understand contract or statement of terms and conditions between the person and the care home that includes how much they will pay and what the home provides for the money. This is what people staying in this care home experience: Judgement: People using this service experience excellent quality outcomes in this area. We have made this judgement using a range of evidence, including a visit to this service. People undergo a full needs assessment and are given sufficient information about the home and its facilities prior to admission, to enable them to be confident that their needs can be met by the service. Evidence: Two peoples care and records were looked at as part of this visit, they each have been provided with a statement of terms and conditions/contract on admission and these are signed by the person or their representative. These documents give clear information about fees and extra charges, which are reviewed and kept up to date. The information is in a large print, easy read format, which includes pictures, so the people using the service can understand what is written. In the two care plans looked at during this visit there was a copy of the community care assessment and Local Authority care plan. The home also completes their assessment of need and from these a detailed and descriptive care plan is developed. Input from other professionals and/or family is also recorded and each plan is Care Homes for Adults (18-65 years) Page 10 of 29 Evidence: individualised to the person using the service. All three people living in the home have been there for some years, they were able to visit the home on several occasions to meet the staff and other people using the service, before making the decision to come in permanently. They told us in our surveys that my friend Karen brought me to the home to look around, I liked the bedroom downstairs because I did not like going up the stairs, my parents took me to look around and I choose my own room and one person at Swan house invited me for tea, then I asked if I could live there. Discussion with the manager indicated that in the future if she has a vacancy she would go out to assess individuals who have expressed an interest in coming into the home, and ensure each person is given information about the service and life in the home. A copy of the homes statement of purpose and service user guide can be found in each persons care plan, and we found from talking to the three people living in the home that they are extremely satisfied with the service. Information from the Annual Quality Assurance Assessment and discussion with the manager and people living in the home indicates that the three people using the service are of White/British nationality. The home does accept people with specific cultural or diverse needs and everyone is assessed on an individual basis. Discussion with the manager indicated that the home looks after people from the local community, although placements are open to individuals from all areas. The member of staff on duty was knowledgeable about the needs of each person and had a good understanding of the care given on a daily basis. Information from the peoples surveys showed that they were satisfied with the care they receive and have a good relationship with the staff. Information from the training files and training matrix indicates that the staff and manager are up to date with their basic mandatory safe working practice training, and have access to a range of more specialised subjects that link to the needs of people using the service. There are no communication problems between the staff and the people living in the home, we found individuals were eager to meet us and tell us all about life in the home. They displayed confidence and enthusiasm in talking to us about their hobbies, interests and daily lives. Care Homes for Adults (18-65 years) Page 11 of 29 Care Homes for Adults (18-65 years) Page 12 of 29 Individual needs and choices These are the outcomes that people staying in care homes should experience. They reflect the things that people have said are important to them: People’s needs and goals are met. The home has a plan of care that the person, or someone close to them, has been involved in making. People are able to make decisions about their life, including their finances, with support if they need it. This is because the staff promote their rights and choices. People are supported to take risks to enable them to stay independent. This is because the staff have appropriate information on which to base decisions. People are asked about, and are involved in, all aspects of life in the home. This is because the manager and staff offer them opportunities to participate in the day to day running of the home and enable them to influence key decisions. People are confident that the home handles information about them appropriately. This is because the home has clear policies and procedures that staff follow. This is what people staying in this care home experience: Judgement: People using this service experience excellent quality outcomes in this area. We have made this judgement using a range of evidence, including a visit to this service. People are encouraged to be independent within their daily lives using a risk assessment approach to care. Evidence: Information from the surveys indicates that the people using the service are satisfied that the staff give appropriate support and care to those living in the home. People said they are able to make their own decisions about their daily lives most of the time; that staff treat them well and listen and act on what they say. Comments from the surveys said I am happy with my home at swan house, I like the people at swan house and I like the staff at swan house and they look after me well. Each individual has a detailed, descriptive and person centred plan, which identifies their individual needs and abilities, choice and decisions and likes and dislikes. In Care Homes for Adults (18-65 years) Page 13 of 29 Evidence: addition to this information there are risk assessments to cover daily activities of life, behaviour management plans where a risk to the person or others has been identified, and clear information about health and input from professionals and the outcomes for people. Staff are monitoring and reviewing the care plans on a regular basis and work is progressing to ensure each plan is explained to the person concerned and that their signature/or their representatives signature is obtained to show they agree with the content. Reviews of care with the families, person living in the home and care co-ordinator from the local authority are taking place and minutes of these meetings are in the plans. In addition to the main care plan is a second file, which is personalised and completed by each individual with support from the staff. People in the home have used photographs and pictures about their lives, work completed in literacy and numeracy classes and easy to read information about their needs and abilities to produce a detailed and informative insight into their achievements over the past year. The three people we spoke to are proud of their files and show them to friends and family when they visit. Staff enable people to take responsible risks in their every day lives and information within the care plans includes a number of risk assessments covering activities of daily living. Talking to the people living in the home and watching them go about their daily business showed that some individuals find it relatively easy to maintain their independence and are able to make their choices and decisions known without a lot of input from the staff. Others require more from the staff because of communication difficulties, physical support and assistance and this is managed well on a day-to-day basis. Care Homes for Adults (18-65 years) Page 14 of 29 Lifestyle These are the outcomes that people staying in care homes should experience. They reflect the things that people have said are important to them: Each person is treated as an individual and the care home is responsive to his or her race, culture, religion, age, disability, gender and sexual orientation. They can take part in activities that are appropriate to their age and culture and are part of their local community. The care home supports people to follow personal interests and activities. People are able to keep in touch with family, friends and representatives and the home supports them to have appropriate personal, family and sexual relationships. People are as independent as they can be, lead their chosen lifestyle and have the opportunity to make the most of their abilities. Their dignity and rights are respected in their daily life. People have healthy, well-presented meals and snacks, at a time and place to suit them. People have opportunities to develop their social, emotional, communication and independent living skills. This is because the staff support their personal development. People choose and participate in suitable leisure activities. This is what people staying in this care home experience: Judgement: People using this service experience excellent quality outcomes in this area. We have made this judgement using a range of evidence, including a visit to this service. There is a wide range of activities provided within the home and community, which gives people living in the home the opportunity to maintain and develop their living skills and participate in stimulating and motivating activities that meet their individual needs, wants and aspirations. Evidence: Information in the care plans complied by each person and talking to individuals clearly showed that people in the home are able to access a wide range of activities and outings on a regular basis. Pictures show where they have been in the local area, what they have done on holiday and which friends they have been socialising with. People told us that they attend a day centre during the week (monday to friday) and that they have lots of friends who also go there. They said that they have been out a Care Homes for Adults (18-65 years) Page 15 of 29 Evidence: lot over the christmas period, going to the shops, for meals, the cinema and seeing family. Individuals told us that they enjoy the day centre as they do lots of activities and group work, each person attends a different group at the centre so they have their own friends and lots to talk about at the end of each day. Comments from our surveys were that I plan each day and I like to see my friend Brian, crafts, drama, walking and like going for lunch out. I like the residents meetings and I have and can say anything, I like to choose each day and do what I like doing best and I am always busy and relax on an evening. As the home is only for three people and the owners live on the premises as well, there is a very family orientated feel to the service. People using the service are encouraged and supported to have good contact with their relatives and friends. People told us that I like going out in the car for days out, shopping, church on a sunday in good weather, I like going out for dinner, a ride in the car and shopping and sometimes I go to mum and dads, but I like to come home to swan house. I do not sleep at mum and dads because I miss swan house when I am there. After meeting the three people staying in the home and talking to them, they went off to their day centre so we were unable to observe a mealtime within the home. However, all three people were full of praise for the meals they recieved and said the food is wonderful. The manager told us that breakfast and the evening meal is cooked by herself or her husband (they are the registered providers), and that individuals have a packed lunch at the day centre. Menus are put together with the people using the service and those seen by us were in a pictoral and clear print format. Care Homes for Adults (18-65 years) Page 16 of 29 Personal and healthcare support These are the outcomes that people staying in care homes should experience. They reflect the things that people have said are important to them: People receive personal support from staff in the way they prefer and want. Their physical and emotional health needs are met because the home has procedures in place that staff follow. If people take medicine, they manage it themselves if they can. If they cannot manage their medicine, the care home supports them with it in a safe way. If people are approaching the end of their life, the care home will respect their choices and help them to feel comfortable and secure. They, and people close to them, are reassured that their death will be handled with sensitivity, dignity and respect, and take account of their spiritual and cultural wishes. This is what people staying in this care home experience: Judgement: People using this service experience excellent quality outcomes in this area. We have made this judgement using a range of evidence, including a visit to this service. Peoples personal and healthcare needs are met through good inter-agency working and by the staff having a sound knowledge of each individuals needs. Evidence: It was apparent from discussions with the staff and the people using the service that individuals require primarily support and encouragement to do as much as possible for themselves. Whilst all three people require some assistance with personal care such as bathing and washing, this is relatively low key and in the main consists of staff supervision and guidance. The staff are fully aware of the need to maintain peoples dignity and efforts are ongoing to achieve this whilst carrying out care tasks. The care plans are very detailed about individual wishes and routines so that peoples independence is supported and individuality is not lost. The home is able to offer people a choice of staff gender for carrying out personal tasks, as there are male and female care staff within the home. Discussion with the people living in the home indicates that they have no difficulties communicating with the staff and that they can express their preferences of staff gender for individuals Care Homes for Adults (18-65 years) Page 17 of 29 Evidence: giving their personal care. In general there was a very flexible approach to the peoples routines although they are expected to attend their day centre and some individuals have small housekeeping duties to perform. People told us they enjoy washing up after meals and hoovering their own rooms. People said that they have good access to their GPs, chiropody, dentist and optician services, with records of their visits being written into their care plans. They all have access to outpatient appointments at the hospital and records show that they have an escort from the home if wished. Comments from the people indicate they are satisfied with the level of medical support given to them. Only one person at the home recieves medication and this is kept in a locked cupboard. There is a weekly dosette case for this individual, which is filled by the pharmacy. The care plan for this person shows they recieve regular medication reviews from their GP and other specialists involved in their care. The staff who are responsible for administration of medication have received appropriate training. The medication records are complete and up to date and there was no fridge medication or controlled drugs in the home at the time of this visit (January 2009). The home does have some homely remedies medication and these are kept strictly in accordance with the policy and procedure. The manager has a folder containing information about all the medication in the home and this is monitored, reviewed and updated as necessary. Care Homes for Adults (18-65 years) Page 18 of 29 Concerns, complaints and protection These are the outcomes that people staying in care homes should experience. They reflect the things that people have said are important to them: If people have concerns with their care, they or people close to them, know how to complain. Their concern is looked into and action taken to put things right. The care home safeguards people from abuse, neglect and self-harm and takes action to follow up any allegations. There are no additional outcomes. This is what people staying in this care home experience: Judgement: People using this service experience good quality outcomes in this area. We have made this judgement using a range of evidence, including a visit to this service. The home has a satisfactory complaints system with some evidence that peoples views are listened to and acted upon. Evidence: The home has a complaints policy and procedure that is found within the statement of purpose and service user guide, a copy is also in each persons care plan. The care plans also contain information about advocates and have contact names and addresses, this information is provided in a pictoral and large print format. Peoples survey responses showed individuals have a clear understanding about how to make their views and opinions heard and those people spoken to said we can always talk to the staff or the manager. Checks of the records show that there have been no formal complaints made about the home or its service since the last key visit in January 2007. The staff demonstrated a good awareness of the process to safeguard the people in the home. They had all received training on the subject that included the types and indications of abuse. The manager and staff are booked onto futher training around safeguarding of adults in March 2009. Care Homes for Adults (18-65 years) Page 19 of 29 Evidence: No referrals have been made under the Protection of Vulnerable Adults procedure. Appropriate policies and procedures are in place in relation to the protection of the people using the service. Discussion with the people using the service indicates that they feel safe within the home and are confident that staff would help them if they had any concerns or problems. Each person has their own financial file with individual pocket money books and sheets showing money recieved, saved and banked. All information sheets have picture formats as well so individuals know and understand the process. Care Homes for Adults (18-65 years) Page 20 of 29 Environment These are the outcomes that people staying in care homes should experience. They reflect the things that people have said are important to them: People stay in a safe and well-maintained home that is homely, clean, comfortable, pleasant and hygienic. People stay in a home that has enough space and facilities for them to lead the life they choose and to meet their needs. The home makes sure they have the right specialist equipment that encourages and promotes their independence. Their room feels like their own, it is comfortable and they feel safe when they use it. People have enough privacy when using toilets and bathrooms. This is what people staying in this care home experience: Judgement: People using this service experience good quality outcomes in this area. We have made this judgement using a range of evidence, including a visit to this service. The environment provides people with safe, comfortable and homely surroundings in which to live, that meet their individual needs and lifestyles, Evidence: The home presented as a normal domestic environment. There is no external indication that it is a care home thereby minimising any possible stigmatisation of the people using the service. The furnishings and fittings of the communal or shared areas, such as the lounge and kitchen, continue the theme of domesticity. They are furnished and decorated to a good standard and are appropriate for the needs of the people living in the home. Discussion with the manager, observation of the environment and information supplied to us during this visit indicates that there is a maintenance programme in place for the home. We found that peoples bedrooms have been redecorated and furnished with new bed linen and curtains of their choice. People told us that I try and keep my room tidy and clean, and sue, john and caroline help me, my room and everywhere is lovely and I love my bedroom and can choose the colours I like it to be. Care Homes for Adults (18-65 years) Page 21 of 29 Evidence: Since the last visit in January 2007 the rear garden area has been block paved to create a secure and safe area for people to walk in and sit out in the sunshine during the better weather. A small laundry room off the kitchen is in the process of being turned into a toilet room; this is for use by people when they are out in the garden and saves them having to walk a long way through the house. People using the service all have their own single bedrooms. One person has a ground floor room with patio doors out onto the paved garden area and another individual has a small annex to their room, which they use as a private area for sitting in. The room on the ground floor has an en-suite bathroom, and two people on the first floor share a shower room. People have their own lounge with a large screen television with a video/DVD player. The house kitchen is shared with the registered providers, but the people using the service have their own fridge/freezer and washer/dryer so they know what belongs to them. Discussions during this visit indicate that people using the service are satisfied with the laundry service provided by the home. Infection control policies and procedures are in place, and staff have access to good supplies of aprons and gloves for use in personal care. Staff training in infection control is part of the mandatory programme and up to date. Care Homes for Adults (18-65 years) Page 22 of 29 Staffing These are the outcomes that people staying in care homes should experience. They reflect the things that people have said are important to them: People have safe and appropriate support as there are enough competent, qualified staff on duty at all times. They have confidence in the staff at the home because checks have been done to make sure that they are suitable. People’s needs are met and they are supported because staff get the right training, supervision and support they need from their managers. People are supported by an effective staff team who understand and do what is expected of them. This is what people staying in this care home experience: Judgement: People using this service experience good quality outcomes in this area. We have made this judgement using a range of evidence, including a visit to this service. People are protected by the homes recruitment procedures, and the assessed needs of individuals are met by well-trained staff. Evidence: The staffing group within the home consists of the registered manager/provider, the registered provider (husband), one care support worker and on occassion the providers daughter acts as a support worker. The support worker has achieved an NVQ Level 3 and the registered provider has also achieved NVQ Level 3 and an indepth training programme via the British Institute of Learning Disability (BILD). We spoke to the support worker during our visit and observed their interaction with the people using the service. It was clear that they had a good relationship with the people living in the home and demonstrated a good knowledge about their individual wishes and choices. People told us that we can talk to caroline, sue, john and mandy and they listen to us. Each member of staff has their own training file, and these showed that the home has a mandatory training programme and also staff attend a range of specialist subjects around learning disabilities. Care Homes for Adults (18-65 years) Page 23 of 29 Evidence: The home has a recruitment policy and procedure that the manager understands and uses when taking on new members of staff. The current member of support staff has been in post for a number of years. Checks of this persons staff file showed that police (CRB) checks, written references, health checks and past work history are all in place and satisfactory. Care Homes for Adults (18-65 years) Page 24 of 29 Conduct and management of the home These are the outcomes that people staying in care homes should experience. They reflect the things that people have said are important to them: People have confidence in the care home because it is run and managed appropriately. People’s opinions are central to how the home develops and reviews their practice, as the home has appropriate ways of making sure they continue to get things right. The environment is safe for people and staff because health and safety practices are carried out. People get the right support from the care home because the manager runs it appropriately, with an open approach that makes them feel valued and respected. They are safeguarded because the home follows clear financial and accounting procedures, keeps records appropriately and makes sure staff understand the way things should be done. This is what people staying in this care home experience: Judgement: People using this service experience good quality outcomes in this area. We have made this judgement using a range of evidence, including a visit to this service. The management of the home is satisfactory overall and the home regularly reviews aspects of its performance through a good programme of audits and consultations, which includes seeking the views of people using the service, staff and relatives. Evidence: The registered manager is qualified, competent and experienced to run the home. There is evidence that she keeps her practice up to date; she has achieved NVQ Level 4 in Management and Care and the Registered Managers award. Throughout this visit the manager demonstrated a good understanding of what constitutes good care and provided numerous examples on how that could be achieved. From discussions with the people using the service and the staff, it was apparent that the manager possessed good leadership skills. The manager has a democratic style that involves the people living in the home and the staff in the decision making processes. Care Homes for Adults (18-65 years) Page 25 of 29 Evidence: Since our last visit to the home in January 2007 the service has been successful in achieving the Local Councils Quality Assurance Certificate (QDS parts 1 and 2). Policies and procedures within the home have been reviewed and updated to meet current legislation and good practice advice from the Department of Health, local/health authorities and specialist/professional organisations. Feedback is sought from the people living in the home and relatives through regular satisfaction questionnaires, and the manager has produced a development report as part of this process to highlight where the service is going and/or indicate how the management team is addressing any shortfalls in the service. Meetings for people using the service are held on a regular basis and minutes are available for those expressing an interest. Staff have meetings with the manager and everyone is encouraged to join in with discussions and voice their opinions. People and staff agreed that they are able to express ideas; criticisms and concerns without prejudice and the management team will take action where necessary to bring about positive change. Maintenance certificates are in place and up to date for all the utilities and equipment within the building. Accident books are filled in appropriately and regulation 37 reports completed and sent on to the Commission where appropriate. Staff have received training in safe working practices and the manager has completed generic risk assessments for a safe environment within the home. Risk assessments were seen regarding fire and daily activities of living. Care Homes for Adults (18-65 years) Page 26 of 29 Are there any outstanding requirements from the last inspection? Yes £ No R Outstanding statutory requirements These are requirements that were set at the previous inspection, but have still not been met. They say what the registered person had to do to meet the Care Standards Act 2000, Care Homes Regulations 2001 and the National Minimum Standards No. Standard Regulation Requirement Timescale for action Care Homes for Adults (18-65 years) Page 27 of 29 Requirements and recommendations from this inspection: Immediate requirements: These are immediate requirements that were set on the day we visited this care home. The registered person had to meet these within 48 hours. No. Standard Regulation Requirement Timescale for action Statutory requirements These requirements set out what the registered person must do to meet the Care Standards Act 2000, Care Homes Regulations 2001 and the National Minimum Standards. The registered person(s) must do this within the timescales we have set. No. Standard Regulation Requirement Timescale for action Recommendations These recommendations are taken from the best practice described in the National Minimum Standards and the registered person(s) should consider them as a way of improving their service. No. Refer to Standard Good Practice Recommendations Care Homes for Adults (18-65 years) Page 28 of 29 Helpline: Telephone: 0845 015 0120 or 0191 233 3323 Textphone: 0845 015 2255 or 0191 233 3588 Email: enquiries@csci.gsi.gov.uk Web: www.csci.org.uk We want people to be able to access this information. If you would like a summary in a different format or language please contact our helpline or go to our website. Copyright © (2009) Commission for Social Care Inspection (CSCI). This publication may be reproduced in whole or in part, free of charge, in any format or medium provided that it is not used for commercial gain. This consent is subject to the material being reproduced accurately and on proviso that it is not used in a derogatory manner or misleading context. The material should be acknowledged as CSCI copyright, with the title and date of publication of the document specified. Care Homes for Adults (18-65 years) Page 29 of 29 - Please note that this information is included on www.bestcarehome.co.uk under license from the regulator. Re-publishing this information is in breach of the terms of use of that website. Discrete codes and changes have been inserted throughout the textual data shown on the site that will provide incontrovertable proof of copying in the event this information is re-published on other websites. 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