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Care Home: The Court

  • The Court Rockbeare Exeter Devon EX5 2EF
  • Tel: 01404822632
  • Fax:

The Court is a three storey detached Georgian House situated in the village of Rockbeare, East Devon. It is next to the parish church, with the post office close by. Residential care can be provided for up to twenty-one older people, which includes people who may have a physical disability. However, the manager and provider generally choose to run with an occupancy of eighteen. There are nine single rooms with en-suites and eight double rooms with ensuites. The accommodation is on the ground and first floors. There is a shaft lift between the floors. On the ground floor there is a large lounge and a separate homely dining room. The lounge has large windows overlooking the countryside, as do many of the bedrooms. The garden is well kept and enjoyed by the people living at the home. The home has its own mini bus. The last inspection report is offered to all prospective residents, and a copy of the inspection report is on display in the hall. The fees range from £400 to £425 per week. This does not include the costs of the hairdresser, chiropodist, optician or any newspaper ordered by people living at the home but does include activities.

  • Latitude: 50.748001098633
    Longitude: -3.3900001049042
  • Manager: Mrs Jacqueline Sandra Barbara Boston
  • Price p/w: £413
  • UK
  • Total Capacity: 21
  • Type: Care home only
  • Provider: Mrs Vivienne Elizabeth Slater,Mrs Elaine Alison Slater
  • Ownership: Private
  • Care Home ID: 15657
Residents Needs:
Old age, not falling within any other category, Physical disability

Previous Inspections

This may not be the latest inspection for this service as we are having techinical problems updating from CQC - please check directly on the regulators website for the most recent report; bestcarehome hopes to be back to regular updates shortly.

For extracts, read the latest CQC inspection for The Court.

CARE HOMES FOR OLDER PEOPLE The Court The Court Rockbeare Exeter Devon EX5 2EF Lead Inspector Louise Delacroix Unannounced Inspection 09:20 11 September 2008 th X10015.doc Version 1.40 Page 1 The Commission for Social Care Inspection aims to: • • • • Put the people who use social care first Improve services and stamp out bad practice Be an expert voice on social care Practise what we preach in our own organisation Reader Information Document Purpose Author Audience Further copies from Copyright Inspection Report CSCI General Public 0870 240 7535 (telephone order line) This report is copyright Commission for Social Care Inspection (CSCI) and may only be used in its entirety. Extracts may not be used or reproduced without the express permission of CSCI www.csci.org.uk Internet address The Court DS0000034178.V359735.R01.S.doc Version 5.2 Page 2 This is a report of an inspection to assess whether services are meeting the needs of people who use them. The legal basis for conducting inspections is the Care Standards Act 2000 and the relevant National Minimum Standards for this establishment are those for Care Homes for Older People. They can be found at www.dh.gov.uk or obtained from The Stationery Office (TSO) PO Box 29, St Crispins, Duke Street, Norwich, NR3 1GN. Tel: 0870 600 5522. Online ordering: www.tso.co.uk/bookshop This report is a public document. Extracts may not be used or reproduced without the prior permission of the Commission for Social Care Inspection. The Court DS0000034178.V359735.R01.S.doc Version 5.2 Page 3 SERVICE INFORMATION Name of service The Court Address The Court Rockbeare Exeter Devon EX5 2EF 01404 822632 Telephone number Fax number Email address Provider Web address Name of registered provider(s)/company (if applicable) Name of registered manager (if applicable) Type of registration No. of places registered (if applicable) Mrs Elaine Alison Slater Mrs Vivienne Elizabeth Slater Mrs Joy Rhodes Care Home 21 Category(ies) of Old age, not falling within any other category registration, with number (21), Physical disability over 65 years of age of places (21) The Court DS0000034178.V359735.R01.S.doc Version 5.2 Page 4 SERVICE INFORMATION Conditions of registration: Date of last inspection 13th September 2006 Brief Description of the Service: The Court is a three storey detached Georgian House situated in the village of Rockbeare, East Devon. It is next to the parish church, with the post office close by. Residential care can be provided for up to twenty-one older people, which includes people who may have a physical disability. However, the manager and provider generally choose to run with an occupancy of eighteen. There are nine single rooms with en-suites and eight double rooms with ensuites. The accommodation is on the ground and first floors. There is a shaft lift between the floors. On the ground floor there is a large lounge and a separate homely dining room. The lounge has large windows overlooking the countryside, as do many of the bedrooms. The garden is well kept and enjoyed by the people living at the home. The home has its own mini bus. The last inspection report is offered to all prospective residents, and a copy of the inspection report is on display in the hall. The fees range from £400 to £425 per week. This does not include the costs of the hairdresser, chiropodist, optician or any newspaper ordered by people living at the home but does include activities. The Court DS0000034178.V359735.R01.S.doc Version 5.2 Page 5 SUMMARY This is an overview of what the inspector found during the inspection. The quality rating for this service is 2 star. This means the people who use this service experience good quality outcomes. Prior to the inspection, the home completed an Annual Quality Assurance Assessment (AQAA), which provides the commission (CSCI) with current information about the service, staff and people living at the home. Earlier in the year, CSCI also sent surveys to people living at the home and nine people told us what it was like to live at The Court. We also received two surveys from relatives/friends. Their anonymous responses have also been included in the report The inspection was unannounced and took place over nine hours and twentyfive minutes. There were sixteen people living at the home. Time was spent talking individually to people living at the home and their views on the care they receive have been incorporated into this report. An expert by experience from Help The Aged joined us for the inspection, and also spent time talking individually to six people, and the expert’s report has been incorporated into this one. As part of the inspection, three people were case tracked, this means that where possible the three people were asked about their experience of living at the home, their rooms were visited and the records linked to their care and stay inspected. During the inspection, a tour of the building took place and records including care plans, staff recruitment, training and medication were looked at. As part of the inspection, discussion took place with the registered manager and owner. Staff members also spoke about their roles and responsibilities, and these responses are contained in this report. We also spoke with two visitors. The registered manager works closely with the owners, who live on site, and have a ‘hands on’ approach, which is appreciated by people living and working at the home. What the service does well: Prospective residents are encouraged to visit and meet the people living at the home, and are provided with helpful information. Thorough assessments are completed of their care needs so that the home can ensure that they are able to offer the correct level of support. This information is then re-written into a The Court DS0000034178.V359735.R01.S.doc Version 5.2 Page 6 plan of care. This gives clear guidance to care staff, who are a skilled, friendly and committed team, and popular with the people living and visiting the home. People are supported to access all health care provision and where necessary appropriate equipment is provided. Medication is well managed and people appeared relaxed with staff and felt that they were well cared for. The home has worked hard to provide a greater variety of internal entertainment to compliment external entertainment including musical groups. The home has its own minibus and there are trips to the shops and local areas for those that wish to go. People living at the home are supported to maintain links their faith or make contact with groups outside of the home. People felt they could exercise choice and the food was described as meeting their tastes. The environment is homely and attractive. Staff training is promoted and people working at the home felt well supported in their jobs. Staff are clear about their role to safeguard the people in their care. Records are well kept and are up to date, and there is an emphasis on encouraging people to influence decisions connected to the home through residents’ meetings, surveys and open days. The manager is skilled and experienced with a commitment to the people living and working at the home with the result that the home is well run and a safe place to live. What has improved since the last inspection? What they could do better: Please contact the provider for advice of actions taken in response to this inspection. The report of this inspection is available from enquiries@csci.gsi.gov.uk or by contacting your local CSCI office. The summary of this inspection report can be made available in other formats on request. The Court DS0000034178.V359735.R01.S.doc Version 5.2 Page 7 DETAILS OF INSPECTOR FINDINGS CONTENTS Choice of Home (Standards 1–6) Health and Personal Care (Standards 7-11) Daily Life and Social Activities (Standards 12-15) Complaints and Protection (Standards 16-18) Environment (Standards 19-26) Staffing (Standards 27-30) Management and Administration (Standards 31-38) Scoring of Outcomes Statutory Requirements Identified During the Inspection The Court DS0000034178.V359735.R01.S.doc Version 5.2 Page 8 Choice of Home The intended outcomes for Standards 1 – 6 are: 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. Prospective service users have the information they need to make an informed choice about where to live. Each service user has a written contract/ statement of terms and conditions with the home. No service user moves into the home without having had his/her needs assessed and been assured that these will be met. Service users and their representatives know that the home they enter will meet their needs. Prospective service users and their relatives and friends have an opportunity to visit and assess the quality, facilities and suitability of the home. Service users assessed and referred solely for intermediate care are helped to maximise their independence and return home. The Commission considers Standards 3 and 6 the key standards to be inspected. JUDGEMENT – we looked at outcomes for the following standard(s): We looked at standards 3,5 and 6. Quality in this outcome area is good. This judgement has been made using available evidence including a visit to this service. People benefit from good admission and assessment practice, which ensures the home can meet their needs. EVIDENCE: We talked to people about their experience of moving to the home and looked at the home’s admission procedure. Seven people told us in their surveys that they had received enough information about the home before they moved in to help them decide if it was the right place for them. One person did not comment and another said they had needed more information. Two relatives told us in their surveys that they always had enough information about the home to make decisions and another said it was too early to say. The home provides a handbook outlining the service, which the manager said would benefit from further improvement such as comments from people living The Court DS0000034178.V359735.R01.S.doc Version 5.2 Page 9 at the home and provide in different formats such as larger print or audio to meet people’s different needs. One person commented that ‘my daughters chose for me – they chose the best one’. A visitor told us how they and their relative had been encouraged to visit, and that they had felt welcomed. The manager said that if people are unable to visit the home, which is encouraged, a member of the management team would visit them. We talked about ensuring that the paperwork highlights the home’s good practice. The home told us that a pre-admission assessment always takes place before people move to the home. Where people are referred by a social care agency then appropriate paperwork is obtained, which we saw to be the case. The home does not provide intermediate care. If a vacancy is available, they will provide short stays, which was the case when we visited the home. The Court DS0000034178.V359735.R01.S.doc Version 5.2 Page 10 Health and Personal Care The intended outcomes for Standards 7 – 11 are: 7. 8. 9. 10. 11. The service user’s health, personal and social care needs are set out in an individual plan of care. Service users’ health care needs are fully met. Service users, where appropriate, are responsible for their own medication, and are protected by the home’s policies and procedures for dealing with medicines. Service users feel they are treated with respect and their right to privacy is upheld. Service users are assured that at the time of their death, staff will treat them and their family with care, sensitivity and respect. The Commission considers Standards 7, 8, 9 and 10 the key standards to be inspected. JUDGEMENT – we looked at outcomes for the following standard(s): We looked at standards 7,8,9 and 10. Quality in this outcome area is good. This judgement has been made using available evidence including a visit to this service. The health and emotional needs of people are well met by caring and informed staff, who recognise the importance of respect and dignity. There is a good care planning system at the home, meaning the staff follow clear guidance in order to support people. Medication is well managed to help promote the independence and safety of people living at the home. EVIDENCE: We looked at the care plans of three people living at the home to see if they reflected people’s individual care needs, and if they provided clear guidance for staff. They were up to date, reviewed on a regular basis, and generally provided staff with guidance. Staff that we spoke to were clear about people’s individual needs, and told us how handovers at the beginning of shifts updated their knowledge. The manager told us that people are involved in their own care plans and identifying risks, and recognises that although some people have trouble The Court DS0000034178.V359735.R01.S.doc Version 5.2 Page 11 remembering these discussions, she states that their opinions and feelings are still valued. She also told us that staff are encouraged to participate in developing individual people’s care plans, as their observations whilst working closely with people are important. Finally we talked about ways of making the care plan format more accessible to people living at the home. Everyone who responded to our survey told that they always received the care and support they needed. Two relatives told us that their relative/friend either always or usually had their needs met, and that the home could usually meet the different needs of people. People we spoke to also confirmed that they felt well cared for and supported by staff. We looked at how people’s health needs are met. People told us that they either always or usually received the medical support they need. The manager said in the home’s AQAA that where possible people are supported to register with the GP of their choice. We were told that people have access to chiropody and optician services of their choice, as well as support with audiology. People told us that their health needs were well supported and gave examples of visits from district nurses, GPs, chiropodist, dentist and optician, which were also detailed in care plans, as well as benefiting from optional exercise classes to maintain their health. These visits are detailed in care records. Records clearly monitor the weight, dental and nutritional needs of people living at the home. The home has invested in equipment i.e. a stand aid to help meet people’s changing mobility needs. There is also specialist equipment in the home to promote good skin care. A visitor told us about the significant improvements in their relative’s health since their recent move to the home and records confirmed this, showing that the home had liaised well with health services. We met with another person who has been slowly encouraged to maximise their abilities and saw how they were now more comfortable at night and more mobile. The manager and staff have worked with this person in this area of care to gain their trust and understanding, which is demonstrated in their care plan and through discussion with them, and enabled the person to adopt a healthier lifestyle. We were told that people who manage their own medication have lockable storage space to keep it in, which we saw as we met with people in their rooms. The management team also told us how safety checks are in place to help monitor people’s management of their medication. Some people manage their own medication and have signed forms evidencing their understanding of this responsibility, which were seen. Medication administration records were appropriately completed. Medication is stored correctly, including controlled drugs, which were audited and found to match the written balance. We saw training records for staff in this area of care. The Court DS0000034178.V359735.R01.S.doc Version 5.2 Page 12 With regards to dignity, all nine people who returned their surveys confirmed to us in their surveys that they staff always listened to them and acted on what they said. A relative commented ‘ they treat residents with respect and do their best to maintain people’s dignity’. In the home’s AQAA, the manager told us how the home’s pre-admission assessment would identify the needs of people related to equality and diversity, such as religion, diet, care of the dying or age. She told us ‘ageist attitudes within our home would not be tolerated’ and gave us examples how dignity and privacy is maintained in the home. We were told that all carers are supervised and observed providing personal care and that the manager said this was to ensure ‘ the highest levels of care, empathy and support’. On the day of the inspection, people looked well cared for e.g. their appearance, which helps maintain people’s dignity. The expert by experience said in their report ‘All those to whom I spoke were very appreciative of the attention they were given, which was judged to be attentive and kind – two ladies commented that it was nice that staff always had time to talk for a while and did not just come into their rooms and go out again as quickly as possible. Any requests for attention or any problems were dealt with promptly and sympathetically.’ People told us that their clothes were well cared and the expert commented that ‘there was high praise for the laundry service which seemed particularly efficient and of a high standard’. When we spoke to staff working at the home, they all showed respect for the people living at the home and understood their individual needs, an understanding of gender difference, and an appreciation of the importance of people being able to maintain significant relationships. The Court DS0000034178.V359735.R01.S.doc Version 5.2 Page 13 Daily Life and Social Activities The intended outcomes for Standards 12 - 15 are: 12. 13. 14. 15. Service users find the lifestyle experienced in the home matches their expectations and preferences, and satisfies their social, cultural, religious and recreational interests and needs. Service users maintain contact with family/ friends/ representatives and the local community as they wish. Service users are helped to exercise choice and control over their lives. Service users receive a wholesome appealing balanced diet in pleasing surroundings at times convenient to them. The Commission considers all of the above key standards to be inspected. JUDGEMENT – we looked at outcomes for the following standard(s): We looked at standards 12,13,14,and 15. Quality in this outcome area is good. This judgement has been made using available evidence including a visit to this service. The home recognises the importance of people’s social lives and how this needs to be met on an individual basis. Meals are varied and can be influenced by people living at the home. People are encouraged to maintain their independence, exercising choice and taking control over their lives. EVIDENCE: We asked people how they spent their time. People told us that there are always activities arranged by the home which they can take part in. One person said that they were ‘quite happy at present’. The manager told us that the home provides ‘a wide range of activities, taking into account the wide diversities of each of our residents’, which are well publicised. The home has an activities co-ordinator, and we were told that their role is ‘to provide residents with regular contact with a familiar, friendly daily contact …individually and in groups, also visiting residents who choose not to leave their rooms’. On the day of the inspection, a group of people had chosen to sit and watch a documentary together. The atmosphere was relaxed and friendly. One person confirmed this when we spoke to them before the programme The Court DS0000034178.V359735.R01.S.doc Version 5.2 Page 14 began. They told us they enjoyed reading their paper and book in the lounge and meeting other people. The manager told us that a loop system is being considered to aid people with hearing-loss to participate in-group activities. We were told that transport, outings and in house entertainments are included in the weekly fee. One of the strengths of the home is its strong links with the local community, including the church, local school and community hall activities. The manager told us that some people had a Christian faith and had access to a monthly communion at the home and a visiting Christian group. One person at the home is also visited on an individual basis to support their faith. The home also has open days, which this summer included live music, people living at the home spoke positively about the event and showed a sense of involvement with the day. People are also encouraged to attend a local centre for lunch and coffee mornings. The Expert by Experience commented that ‘There were a number of regular activities and outings listed on the notice board along with photographs of residents enjoying these. Two ladies mentioned the “exercise lady” who sometimes for a change took people to the shops or just out for coffee’. Records confirmed a range of activities and a visitor commented that the home would be lost without the dynamic role of the activities co-ordinator. Relatives said they kept in touch either by ‘popping’ in regularly or by the home helping their relative/friend to contact them, and that they were usually told of important issues. Visitors spoke about the warm and caring staff. An improvement identified by the manager is for better information to relatives and visitors about planned activities to encourage their participation. The manager states in the home’s AQAA that visiting times are unrestricted, which visitors confirmed. She also recognises the importance of maintaining personal and social relationships, which we saw examples of during the inspection. One relative/friend said that the home always supported people to live the life they choose, and a second person said ‘they appear to do their best given that all the residents are very elderly’. The manager said that the home would ‘continue to train staff to spend time to listen to residents comments and choices and report them to management and ensure where possible that their wishes are considered and where possible met’. The home has a qualified chef, who has contact with people living at the home and we were told that choice is available. There is a fridge for people to store personal items of food. The Expert by Experience said there was universal approval of the food provided, with individual likes and dislikes are catered for. Breakfast is generally served in people’s rooms, and lunch and tea in the dining room but people also told us that this could change if they wished. The Court DS0000034178.V359735.R01.S.doc Version 5.2 Page 15 The cook places great emphasis on sourcing meat and vegetables locally, and the owner and the cook told us how they shared ideas to introduce new dishes. We were also told that people can give suggestions or identify problems in residents’ meetings. In the home’s AQAA, the manager told us that diet is covered as part of the pre-admission assessment to ensure that issues of equality and diversity are addressed. The dining room is attractive and spacious, and we saw that people were relaxed during their meal, and were offered seconds by staff who were attentive to people’s needs. The Court DS0000034178.V359735.R01.S.doc Version 5.2 Page 16 Complaints and Protection The intended outcomes for Standards 16 - 18 are: 16. 17. 18. Service users and their relatives and friends are confident that their complaints will be listened to, taken seriously and acted upon. Service users’ legal rights are protected. Service users are protected from abuse. The Commission considers Standards 16 and 18 the key standards to be. JUDGEMENT – we looked at outcomes for the following standard(s): We looked at standards 16 and 18. Quality in this outcome area is good. This judgement has been made using available evidence including a visit to this service. People are confident about who to approach if they have a problem and the home has a clear complaints policy. Staff are clear in their understanding of their duty to report poor practice if seen, which helps create a safe environment for people living at the home. EVIDENCE: People told us in their surveys that they felt confident there was always someone they could talk to if they were not happy, and that they knew how to make a complaint, although one person commented that ‘no need to, but any problems I would go to staff’. The complaint policy is clearly displayed around the home. Relatives knew how to make a complaint and felt that the home had always responded appropriately if they had raised concerns. The Commission has not received any complaints about the home, and the home told us in their AQQA that they had not received any complaints. Records show that staff have received training in the safeguarding of vulnerable people, and this was demonstrated in discussions with staff about their understanding of their role and responsibilities in this area. We spoke to staff about their understanding of safeguarding issues, and they showed through their responses that they were aware of their responsibility to whistleblow on poor practice. The Court DS0000034178.V359735.R01.S.doc Version 5.2 Page 17 Environment The intended outcomes for Standards 19 – 26 are: 19. 20. 21. 22. 23. 24. 25. 26. Service users live in a safe, well-maintained environment. Service users have access to safe and comfortable indoor and outdoor communal facilities. Service users have sufficient and suitable lavatories and washing facilities. Service users have the specialist equipment they require to maximise their independence. Service users’ own rooms suit their needs. Service users live in safe, comfortable bedrooms with their own possessions around them. Service users live in safe, comfortable surroundings. The home is clean, pleasant and hygienic. The Commission considers Standards 19 and 26 the key standards to be inspected. JUDGEMENT – we looked at outcomes for the following standard(s): We looked at standards 19,24 and 26. Quality in this outcome area is good. This judgement has been made using available evidence including a visit to this service. The standard of the home’s environment is good, providing people with a homely and spacious place to live, which is kept clean and odour free. EVIDENCE: Communal rooms are spacious, homely and well furnished. The home is well maintained; people told us that since the last inspection, there were new curtains and carpets in some areas of the home. A visitor confirmed that their relative’s room had been painted and re-decorated before they had moved in. People said that gardens are accessible and well used in the summer. People spoken to say they like their rooms and many portrayed a real sense of it being their private space, complete with their own personal possessions and in some cases their own furniture. Most rooms have large windows that overlook the surrounding countryside. One person had moved rooms so they The Court DS0000034178.V359735.R01.S.doc Version 5.2 Page 18 had a better view of the countryside, they told us this was important to them because of their previous job. Staff recognised their past employment and had supported the move. Locks that are accessible in emergencies have been fitted to people’s bedroom doors. A tour of the building showed that radiators in the bedrooms have been fitted with covers to prevent the risk of people being burnt, one remains uncovered and the occupant of the room explained that this was their choice. The management team discussed this with us, and confirmed they had assessed the risk to the individual. Everyone told us that the home was always fresh and clean, expressing their satisfaction with the standard of cleaning. The home has a sluice and a washing machine with a sluicing facility in recognition of peoples’ changing needs. A tour took place, which included visiting communal areas, bathrooms and people’s rooms. The home was odour free. Staff spoke to us about the procedure for infection control, and confirmed that they were provided with plenty of equipment to help prevent cross infection. Some staff are booked in for training in this area. The Court DS0000034178.V359735.R01.S.doc Version 5.2 Page 19 Staffing The intended outcomes for Standards 27 – 30 are: 27. 28. 29. 30. Service users’ needs are met by the numbers and skill mix of staff. Service users are in safe hands at all times. Service users are supported and protected by the home’s recruitment policy and practices. Staff are trained and competent to do their jobs. The Commission consider all the above are key standards to be inspected. JUDGEMENT – we looked at outcomes for the following standard(s): We looked standards 27,28,29 and 30. Quality in this outcome area is adequate. This judgement has been made using available evidence including a visit to this service. Staff have a caring approach with recognition of individual needs. However, staff recruitment could be better managed to help keep people safe. Training is encouraged to provide skilled workers, which benefits the people living at the home. EVIDENCE: Staff rotas show that there are generally three/four care staff in the morning, two/three in the afternoon, and two/three in the evenings. The rota does not include the owner but people confirmed that she provides hands on care when necessary. She agreed that her name should be on the rota and that this would now happen. A cook and domestic worker/kitchen assistant also support the care team, and there is an activities co-ordinator. The home has one waking night staff and the owner who lives on site is on call. She has said that in an emergency her husband would also provide support i.e. evacuation. She confirmed that staffing levels are flexible and would be increased to meet people’s changing needs i.e. end of life care. The manager told us in their AQAA that they have focussed on efficiency by making the best use of staff time by having flexible roles so that they can provide a high standard of care. However, one visitor expressed concern that people using the lounge in the afternoon would benefit from more direct staff The Court DS0000034178.V359735.R01.S.doc Version 5.2 Page 20 attention if they are unable to use a call bell. We were told that staff do regularly check the lounge as they pass by, which we saw on the inspection. Two relatives said that the care staff always have the right skills and experience to look after people properly. One person said ‘ the staff are all very kind and caring and all the residents appear to be clean, well fed and looked after well’. Other comments included ‘ they provide a homely atmosphere and try to make residents feel part of an extended family’ and ‘always available and friendly’. People living at the home told us about the staff members’ caring approach. Staff praised the role of the deputy and the way she worked with people living at the home. The home remains committed to training reflected by staff successes in passing NVQ 2 or 3 in care resulting in 80 of the staff having this qualification. We were told that 20 of staff are in the process of completing NVQ training, and staff talked about their training in this area and we saw their certificates. Three staff files were inspected. There was evidence of a recruitment protocol and records were kept, but the protocol needs to be more robust and provide a clearer audit trail. Three of the staff files contained some of the required information, including references, ID, and employment history. However, the police checks (CRB) were not always for the current place of employment, which is not safe practice. Staff are encouraged to participate in training, and the home has recently joined a training consortium to help update staff’s practice. Staff spoken to on the day of inspection had completed mandatory training, and special interest training e.g. understanding challenging behaviour. Staff training records confirmed this. Discussion with staff also confirmed that they were clear about their roles and responsibilities. Some people are booked to attend infection control. We discussed with the home about completing an audit of training to provide an overview of staff training, which will help ensure that people’s training is up to date. We discussed the home’s induction process and how it would benefit from including privacy and dignity, and the needs of older people. The Court DS0000034178.V359735.R01.S.doc Version 5.2 Page 21 Management and Administration The intended outcomes for Standards 31 – 38 are: 31. 32. 33. 34. 35. 36. 37. 38. Service users live in a home which is run and managed by a person who is fit to be in charge, of good character and able to discharge his or her responsibilities fully. Service users benefit from the ethos, leadership and management approach of the home. The home is run in the best interests of service users. Service users are safeguarded by the accounting and financial procedures of the home. Service users’ financial interests are safeguarded. Staff are appropriately supervised. Service users’ rights and best interests are safeguarded by the home’s record keeping, policies and procedures. The health, safety and welfare of service users and staff are promoted and protected. The Commission considers Standards 31, 33, 35 and 38 the key standards to be inspected. JUDGEMENT – we looked at outcomes for the following standard(s): We looked at standards 31,33,35,37 and 38. Quality in this outcome area is good. This judgement has been made using available evidence including a visit to this service. The home is well run by a competent and experienced manager who is committed to improving and maintaining the standard of care provided. EVIDENCE: The manager is registered as a manager with CSCI. She has a range of experience of working with older people in a variety of settings, and has shown a strong commitment to learning as evidenced by her training. In telephone calls to CSCI, she has demonstrated an understanding of the promotion of equality and diversity, and has provided concrete examples of how this has been achieved within the home. The content of the home’s AQAA shows that the manager keeps up to date with changes, such as the mental capacity act. The Court DS0000034178.V359735.R01.S.doc Version 5.2 Page 22 She is currently working with another staff member to enhance their management experience and build their confidence. There is a genuine sense that people feel involved in the running and life of the home. Records show that the manager holds regular meetings, which we saw the minutes for, and people described feeling listened to. The manager explained that people are also visited individually to ensure that those who chose not to take part in the meetings still felt involved. This was demonstrated by talking to people who live in the home, who were well informed about the plans for the home and its life. Surveys have also been sent out and collated to gather people’s views of the service, while open days provide an opportunity to demonstrate the work of the home and encourages the involvement of relatives and friends. People can influence the menus and recently have been asked about pets for the home. Records also show that staff meetings take place, which include minutes. Discussion with staff confirmed the value of these meetings. Staff and several people living at the home showed an understanding of the inspection process, which suggests an open approach to regulation by the manager. The home assists some people to manage their personal allowances. Records are well kept, including staff signatures and receipts, and a spot check of money held showed that written balances were accurate. A number of records were inspected, as described in the report summary, and generally these were up to date, well written and securely kept. There is clear auditing of accidents/incidents, and CSCI are kept informed of changes within the home, including the well being of people living there. According to the home’s AQAA equipment has been well maintained. The Court DS0000034178.V359735.R01.S.doc Version 5.2 Page 23 SCORING OF OUTCOMES This page summarises the assessment of the extent to which the National Minimum Standards for Care Homes for Older People have been met and uses the following scale. The scale ranges from: 4 Standard Exceeded 2 Standard Almost Met (Commendable) (Minor Shortfalls) 3 Standard Met 1 Standard Not Met (No Shortfalls) (Major Shortfalls) “X” in the standard met box denotes standard not assessed on this occasion “N/A” in the standard met box denotes standard not applicable CHOICE OF HOME Standard No Score 1 2 3 4 5 6 ENVIRONMENT Standard No Score 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 x x 3 x 3 N/A HEALTH AND PERSONAL CARE Standard No Score 7 3 8 3 9 3 10 3 11 x DAILY LIFE AND SOCIAL ACTIVITIES Standard No Score 12 3 13 3 14 3 15 3 COMPLAINTS AND PROTECTION Standard No Score 16 3 17 x 18 3 3 x x x x 3 x 3 STAFFING Standard No Score 27 3 28 3 29 1 30 2 MANAGEMENT AND ADMINISTRATION Standard No 31 32 33 34 35 36 37 38 Score 3 x 4 x 3 x 3 3 The Court DS0000034178.V359735.R01.S.doc Version 5.2 Page 24 Are there any outstanding requirements from the last inspection? Yes. STATUTORY REQUIREMENTS This section sets out the actions, which must be taken so that the registered person/s meets the Care Standards Act 2000, Care Homes Regulations 2001 and the National Minimum Standards. The Registered Provider(s) must comply with the given timescales. No. 1. OP29 Standard Regulation 19 Schedule 2 Requirement The registered person shall not employ a person to work at the care unless he/she has obtained in respect of that person the information and documents specified in paragraphs 1 to 9 of Schedule 2. (Care staff must have police checks (CRBs) for their current position, as CRBs are not portable for care staff. The home must provide evidence to CSCI that staff have CRBs for their employment at The Court). Timescale for action 30/10/08 RECOMMENDATIONS These recommendations relate to National Minimum Standards and are seen as good practice for the Registered Provider/s to consider carrying out. No. 1. 2. The Court Refer to Standard OP29 Good Practice Recommendations The home should review its recruitment procedure to ensure that it is based on best and current practice and guidance. The home should complete an audit of training to provide DS0000034178.V359735.R01.S.doc Version 5.2 Page 25 OP30 an overview of staff training, and review its induction process to ensure it meets the standards set out by Skills for Care. The Court DS0000034178.V359735.R01.S.doc Version 5.2 Page 26 Commission for Social Care Inspection South West Colston 33 33 Colston Avenue Bristol BS1 4UA National Enquiry Line: Telephone: 0845 015 0120 or 0191 233 3323 Textphone: 0845 015 2255 or 0191 233 3588 Email: enquiries@csci.gsi.gov.uk Web: www.csci.org.uk © This report is copyright Commission for Social Care Inspection (CSCI) and may only be used in its entirety. Extracts may not be used or reproduced without the express permission of CSCI The Court DS0000034178.V359735.R01.S.doc Version 5.2 Page 27 - Please note that this information is included on www.bestcarehome.co.uk under license from the regulator. Re-publishing this information is in breach of the terms of use of that website. Discrete codes and changes have been inserted throughout the textual data shown on the site that will provide incontrovertable proof of copying in the event this information is re-published on other websites. The policy of www.bestcarehome.co.uk is to use all legal avenues to pursue such offenders, including recovery of costs. You have been warned!

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