Please wait

Care Home: Trefula House

  • St Day Redruth Cornwall TR16 5ET
  • Tel: 01209820215
  • Fax: 01209822499

0 0 0 610092009Trefula Nursing Home is situated on the outskirts of the village of St Day, near Redruth. It is in a quiet secluded area and has extensive views of the surrounding countryside. The home provides nursing and personal care for up to thirty-four elderly people, there is a Registered Nurse on duty at all times. The home`s registration allows for people with a physical disability, dementia or mental disorder. The home was first registered in 1992 and comprises of a two-storey house with an extension to the rear. Accommodation is provided in two distinct areas. There are toilet and bathing facilities. Some bedrooms have en suite facilities. Meals are prepared in a comparatively small kitchen on the ground floor and served in the dining rooms or lounges. Residents can choose to eat in their individual bedrooms if preferred. The home has extensive gardens that are well maintained. Access for residents is restricted in certain areas for safety reasons. There is a large car park at the front of the home. There is a flexible visiting policy and residents can see their visitors in private. Information about the home is available in the form of a residents` guide, which can be supplied to enquirers on request. A copy of most recent inspection report is available in the home. Current fees range from 476 to 1803 pounds per week this information was supplied during the inspection. Additional charges are made in respect of private healthcare provision, hairdressing and personal items such as newspapers, confectionary and toiletries.

  • Latitude: 50.236999511719
    Longitude: -5.2020001411438
  • Manager: Mrs Susan Barbara Joyce
  • Price p/w: £1140
  • UK
  • Total Capacity: 34
  • Type: Care home with nursing
  • Provider: Tre'care Group Limited
  • Ownership: Private
  • Care Home ID: 16960
Residents Needs:
Old age, not falling within any other category, mental health, excluding learning disability or dementia, Dementia, Physical disability

Previous Inspections

This may not be the latest inspection for this service as we are having techinical problems updating from CQC - please check directly on the regulators website for the most recent report; bestcarehome hopes to be back to regular updates shortly.

For extracts, read the latest CQC inspection for Trefula House.

Random inspection report Care homes for older people Name: Address: Trefula House St Day Redruth Cornwall TR16 5ET one star adequate service 10/09/2009 The quality rating for this care home is: The rating was made on: A quality rating is our assessment of how well a care home, agency or scheme is meeting the needs of the people who use it. We give a quality rating following a full review of the service. We call this review a ‘key’ inspection. This is a report of a random inspection of this care home. A random inspection is a short, focussed review of the service. Details of how to get other inspection reports for this care home, including the last key inspection report, can be found on the last page of this report. Lead inspector: Diana Penrose Date: 1 3 0 5 2 0 1 0 Information about the care home Name of care home: Address: Trefula House St Day Redruth Cornwall TR16 5ET 01209820215 01209822499 admin@trecaregroup.co.uk Telephone number: Fax number: Email address: Provider web address: Name of registered provider(s): Name of registered manager (if applicable) Mrs Susan Barbara Joyce Type of registration: Number of places registered: Conditions of registration: Category(ies) : Trecare Group Limited care home 34 Number of places (if applicable): Under 65 Over 65 12 12 22 0 dementia mental disorder, excluding learning disability or dementia old age, not falling within any other category physical disability Conditions of registration: Date of last inspection Brief description of the care home 0 0 0 6 1 0 0 9 2 0 0 9 Trefula Nursing Home is situated on the outskirts of the village of St Day, near Redruth. It is in a quiet secluded area and has extensive views of the surrounding countryside. The home provides nursing and personal care for up to thirty-four elderly people, there is a Registered Nurse on duty at all times. The homes registration allows Care Homes for Older People Page 2 of 10 Brief description of the care home for people with a physical disability, dementia or mental disorder. The home was first registered in 1992 and comprises of a two-storey house with an extension to the rear. Accommodation is provided in two distinct areas. There are toilet and bathing facilities. Some bedrooms have en suite facilities. Meals are prepared in a comparatively small kitchen on the ground floor and served in the dining rooms or lounges. Residents can choose to eat in their individual bedrooms if preferred. The home has extensive gardens that are well maintained. Access for residents is restricted in certain areas for safety reasons. There is a large car park at the front of the home. There is a flexible visiting policy and residents can see their visitors in private. Information about the home is available in the form of a residents guide, which can be supplied to enquirers on request. A copy of most recent inspection report is available in the home. Current fees range from 476 to 1803 pounds per week this information was supplied during the inspection. Additional charges are made in respect of private healthcare provision, hairdressing and personal items such as newspapers, confectionary and toiletries. Care Homes for Older People Page 3 of 10 What we found: A Regulatory Inspector visited Trefula Nursing Home on 13 May 2010 and spent four and a half hours at the home. In accordance with the amendments to the Care Standards Act inspection programme this was a random inspection and an unannounced visit. The purpose of the inspection was to ensure that residents needs are properly met, in accordance with good care practices and the laws regulating care homes. The focus was on the inspection of certain standards and reviewing compliance with requirements notified at the last inspection. On the day of inspection 32 people were living in the home and a day-care service was provided for one person. The inspector met with staff, residents and the registered manager to gain their views on the services offered by the home. Records, policies and procedures were examined and the inspector toured the building. This report summarises the findings of this inspection. We received a completed Annual Quality Assurance Assessment (AQAA) from the registered manager, 8 surveys completed by people using the service and 5 from staff, prior to this inspection; this information has been used to inform this inspection. No requirements have been notified following this inspection. Residents and staff expressed satisfaction with the care and services provided at the home. We were given an updated copy of the homes statement of purpose, which was suitable. We looked at the care files and medication records for the two most recent admissions to the home. Pre-admission assessment information was seen for both people that included information from other agencies and the Department of Adult Social Care where appropriate. Both people had written care plans in place that had been reviewed regularly. The care plans were in the same format as they were at the last inspection but we were told that the format was to change soon to be more person centred. The plans varied in the amount of detail and direction for staff. We saw various risk assessments included but the risk assessments for the use of bed-rails for the two new residents could not be found. The manager assured us that these had been done and were in a file. As she was in the process of moving offices she said a filing system had not yet been developed. We saw a typed risk assessment in respect of bed-rails for another resident. Since this inspection we have been sent a blank bed-rail risk assessment form which is appropriate. We were shown tick charts completed by nurses and others completed by care staff regarding care tasks undertaken each day. We were shown communication sheets that were completed by the nurses; they included task information mainly and were not written daily. We saw records that had been maintained on a daily basis by care staff but we were told that these had only been introduced on a trial basis for a month. These records were more informative on emotional and behavioural issues. We also saw individual daily handover sheets for residents that gave information on tasks to be done and included some information regarding what went on overnight. A diary was also in use that again detailed tasks to be done each day for varying numbers of residents; issues regarding data protection were discussed with the manager. Each resident had another sheet that detailed what staff did when they went to attend to them in their rooms, for Care Homes for Older People Page 4 of 10 example fluids given or a change of position. Several charts were seen outside of the rooms and did not maintain confidentiality; the manager said she would ensure that the charts were kept inside the bedrooms. Separate activities records were seen and some were more detailed than others. There was a lot of recording but no concise day and night records to show what people did each day, how they felt and how they behaved; this was discussed with the manager who said she would review the record keeping. Residents told us they were well cared for in the home and the surveys we received from residents were positive. When asked what the home does well comments included: I like Trefula for everything, When visiting our mother we always find that she is clean and comfortable and seemingly well cared for, The staff at Trefula always seem to be of good cheer, which adds to a very pleasant atmosphere when visiting and Friendly communicative staff who make an effort to talk to residents. When asked what they could do better comments included Attention to little jobs i.e. dripping taps and clean carpets, Decoration needs attention - have been told this will happen in near future and Not always quick to answer emergency/communication button. The medication records for the two newest residents showed that the administration of medicines was up to date with no gaps in the records. Transcribing onto the charts was not witnessed or signed by two people and the manager was informed of this. The manager told us that an individualised care plan had been devised for one person prescribed medicine on an as required basis; she said this was with the GP for authorisation and a copy could not be found in the home. We were shown the system and storage arrangements for controlled drugs and this was appropriate. The manager told us that level 1 medicines training for care staff had not yet been included in the induction programme. The Inspector toured the building with the registered manager who pointed out improvements made since the last inspection and she told us of plans for the future. We were told that there had been continued investment in the fabric of the home replacing beds, and furniture where necessary. We saw that a bathroom had been re-decorated in the dementia wing and we were shown plans for the development of the bathing facilities and extra bedrooms for this wing. We were told of plans to improve the bathroom near the entrance of the home so that it would be suitable for elderly frail people. We saw that a new office for the manager and a medicines / nurses room had been provided where the dining room used to be. Dining facilities were now included in the lounges and we were told that a small lounge was to be provided upstairs to ensure that communal space had not been reduced. We saw that the home was clean and there were no offensive odours, the maintenance man was seen to be busy throughout the day. The bathrooms looked very clinical and were not homely; some also stored equipment and wheelchairs. Some areas of the home were untidy and there were several notice boards containing information for staff which should really be in the staff room. The grounds were seen to be reasonably tidy; we were told the sensory area had not been developed due to the imminent building work and we were told that another part of the garden was going to be utilised for this now. We examined the personnel files for the three newest employees; they all contained the documents required by legislation. We saw interview records, certificates of training and completed induction records. The manager told us that all new care staff undertake an induction programme in line with the Skills for Care standards. We spoke to two of the Care Homes for Older People Page 5 of 10 newest members of staff and they told us they had had a good induction to the home. They both said they enjoyed their work and felt that the residents were well cared for. They felt there were sufficient staff and surveys told there were usually enough staff on duty to meet the needs of residents. The numbers of serious injuries and deaths recorded at the home corresponded with the number reported to the Commission. We were told that the accident reports were sent to head office to be recorded on a matrix and the manager said she audits these. We were sent a copy of the accident records following this inspection. The manager was in the process of changing the filing system for accident reports so that they were filed per room number rather than kept in the care files. She told us about the people who were prone to falls and said that she involves the falls advisory service when needed. The manager has been registered with the Care Quality Commission since the last inspection and she said she is settling in to the role well. Staff told us that the home runs well and they find the manager to be very caring. Surveys from staff were generally positive about the home and services provided. When asked what the home does well comments included We try to maintain a high standard of care, Cares at all levels, Involves and welcomes family input, Client centred care is top priority, Good varied diet for residents, Referral for training is good and Provides a safe home like environment. When asked what the home could do better comments included, Improve communication between carers, Have more activities, need more activity staff, Needs improvements re: decor and layout of building, Arrange trips out to shops, seaside, gardens etc and Provide equipment for physical activity, walking, cycling machine etc for those who can physically use it. Too many residents just sit all day watching TV. We were told that activities had improved and that the manager was looking to employ a second activities co ordinator. What the care home does well: What they could do better: Care Homes for Older People Page 6 of 10 The care plans should fully inform and direct care staff on the care to be provided. There should be comprehensive daily records that include peoples feelings, behaviour issues and so on. As reported at previous inspections, handwritten instructions on the medication administration charts need to be witnessed with two staff signatures recorded. The home should be kept tidier and provide a homely environment; the bathrooms in particular should be less clinical. If you want to know what action the person responsible for this care home is taking following this report, you can contact them using the details set out on page 2. Care Homes for Older People Page 7 of 10 Are there any outstanding requirements from the last inspection? Yes £ No R Outstanding statutory requirements These are requirements that were set at the previous inspection, but have still not been met. They say what the registered person had to do to meet the Care Standards Act 2000, Regulations 2001 and the National Minimum Standards. No. Standard Regulation Requirement Timescale for action Care Homes for Older People Page 8 of 10 Requirements and recommendations from this inspection: Immediate requirements: These are immediate requirements that were set on the day we visited this care home. The registered person had to meet these within 48 hours. No. Standard Regulation Requirement Timescale for action Statutory requirements These requirements set out what the registered person must do to meet the Care Standards Act 2000, Regulations 2001 and the National Minimum Standards. The registered person(s) must do this within the timescales we have set. No. Standard Regulation Requirement Timescale for action Recommendations These recommendations are taken from the best practice described in the National Minimum Standards and the registered person(s) should consider them as a way of improving their service. No Refer to Standard Good Practice Recommendations 1 2 3 7 7 9 Care plans should always contain sufficient detail to inform and direct staff on the care to be provided. There should be comprehensive daily records that include peoples feelings, behaviour issues and so on. Handwritten instructions on the medication administration charts should be witnessed with two staff signatures recorded. The home should be kept tidier and provide a homely environment; the bathrooms in particular should be less clinical. 4 19 Care Homes for Older People Page 9 of 10 Reader Information Document Purpose: Author: Audience: Further copies from: Inspection Report Care Quality Commission General Public 0870 240 7535 (telephone order line) Our duty to regulate social care services is set out in the Care Standards Act 2000. Copies of the National Minimum Standards –Care Homes for Older People can be found at www.dh.gov.uk or got from The Stationery Office (TSO) PO Box 29, St Crispins, Duke Street, Norwich, NR3 1GN. Tel: 0870 600 5522. Online ordering from the Stationery Office is also available: www.tso.co.uk/bookshop Helpline: Telephone: 03000 616161 Email: enquiries@cqc.org.uk Web: www.cqc.org.uk We want people to be able to access this information. If you would like a summary in a different format or language please contact our helpline or go to our website. © Care Quality Commission 2010 This publication may be reproduced in whole or in part in any format or medium for noncommercial purposes, provided that it is reproduced accurately and not used in a derogatory manner or in a misleading context. The source should be acknowledged, by showing the publication title and © Care Quality Commission 2010. Care Homes for Older People Page 10 of 10 - Please note that this information is included on www.bestcarehome.co.uk under license from the regulator. Re-publishing this information is in breach of the terms of use of that website. Discrete codes and changes have been inserted throughout the textual data shown on the site that will provide incontrovertable proof of copying in the event this information is re-published on other websites. The policy of www.bestcarehome.co.uk is to use all legal avenues to pursue such offenders, including recovery of costs. You have been warned!

The Provider has not yet updated their profile and added details of the services and facilities they offer. If you are the provider and would like to do this, please click the "Do you run this home" button under the Description tab.

The Provider has not yet updated their profile and added details of the services and facilities they offer. If you are the provider and would like to do this, please click the "Do you run this home" button under the Description tab.

Promote this care home

Click here for links and widgets to increase enquiries and referrals for this care home.

  • Widgets to embed inspection reports into your website
  • Formated links to this care home profile
  • Links to the latest inspection report
  • Widget to add iPaper version of SoP to your website