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Care Home: St James's Lodge

  • 74 Molesworth Road Stoke Plymouth Devon PL1 5PF
  • Tel: 01752563003
  • Fax: 01752605705

: St Jamesâs Lodge is a Care Home with Nursing that is registered to accommodate up to 38 people who require Nursing or Terminal Care. They may accommodate up to 10 people with dementia, but they do not offer a service to people with challenging behaviour. People who have a physical disability may be admitted over the age of 40.082008St Jamesâs Lodge is a large Georgian property that has been extended to provide further bedrooms on the ground and first floor, and accessible bathrooms. It offers limited parking space within the front courtyard. The home is arranged over two floors, the first floor being reached by stairs or a fiveperson passenger lift. There are several separate communal areas on the ground floor and a well-maintained garden and patio area to the rear and side of the property. St Jamesâs Lodge is in the Stoke area of Plymouth and is close to local amenities. It is on a bus route that goes directly into Plymouth City Centre. Up to date information about fees may be found on the home`s web site www.mayhaven.com

  • Latitude: 50.376998901367
    Longitude: -4.1620001792908
  • Manager: Mrs Fiona Miller
  • Price p/w: -
  • UK
  • Total Capacity: 38
  • Type: Care home with nursing
  • Provider: St James's Lodge Healthcare Ltd
  • Ownership: Private
  • Care Home ID: 19490
Residents Needs:
Old age, not falling within any other category, Dementia, Physical disability

Previous Inspections

This may not be the latest inspection for this service as we are having techinical problems updating from CQC - please check directly on the regulators website for the most recent report; bestcarehome hopes to be back to regular updates shortly.

For extracts, read the latest CQC inspection for St James's Lodge.

Key inspection report Care homes for older people Name: Address: St James’s Lodge 74 Molesworth Road Stoke Plymouth Devon PL1 5PF The quality rating for this care home is: Three star excellent service A quality rating is our assessment of how well a care home is meeting the needs of the people who use it. We give a quality rating following a full review of the service. We call this full review a ‘key’ inspection. Lead inspector: Stella Lindsay Date: 0 4 1 2 2 0 0 9 This report is a review of the quality of outcomes that people experience in this care home. We believe high quality care should: • Be safe • Have the right outcomes, including clinical outcomes • Be a good experience for the people that use it • Help prevent illness, and promote healthy, independent living • Be available to those who need it when they need it. The first part of the review gives the overall quality rating for the care home: • 3 stars – excellent • 2 stars – good • 1 star – adequate • 0 star – poor There is also a bar chart that gives a quick way of seeing the quality of care that the home provides under key areas that matter to people. There is a summary of what we think this service does well, what they have improved on and, where it applies, what they need to do better. We use the national minimum standards to describe the outcomes that people should experience. National minimum standards are written by the Department of Health for each type of care service. After the summary there is more detail about our findings. The following table explains what you will see under each outcome area Outcome area (for example: Choice of home) These are the outcomes that people staying in care homes should experience. things that people have said are important to them: This box tells you the outcomes that we will always inspect against when we do a key inspection. This box tells you any additional outcomes that we may inspect against when we do a key inspection. This is what people staying in this care home experience: Judgement: This box tells you our opinion of what we have looked at in this outcome area. We will say whether it is excellent, good, adequate or poor. Evidence: This box describes the information we used to come to our judgement They reflect the Care Homes for Older People Page 2 of 27 We review the quality of the service against outcomes from the National Minimum Standards (NMS). Those standards are written by the Department of Health for each type of care service. Copies of the National Minimum Standards – Care homes for older people can be found at www.dh.gov.uk or bought from The Stationery Office (TSO) PO Box 29, St Crispins, Duke Street, Norwich, NR3 1GN. Tel: 0870 600 5522. Online ordering from the Stationery Office is also available: www.tso.co.uk/bookshop. The mission of the Care Quality Commission is to make care better for people by: • Regulating health and adult social care services to ensure quality and safety standards, drive improvement and stamp out bad practice • Protecting the rights of people who use services, particularly the most vulnerable and those detained under the Mental Health Act 1983 • Providing accessible, trustworthy information on the quality of care and services so people can make better decisions about their care and so that commissioners and providers of services can improve services. • Providing independent public accountability on how commissioners and providers of services are improving the quality of care and providing value for money. Reader Information Document Purpose Author Audience Further copies from Copyright Inspection report Care Quality Commission General public 0870 240 7535 (telephone order line) Copyright © (2009) Care Quality Commission (CQC). This publication may be reproduced in whole or in part, free of charge, in any format or medium provided that it is not used for commercial gain. This consent is subject to the material being reproduced accurately and on proviso that it is not used in a derogatory manner or misleading context. The material should be acknowledged as CQC copyright, with the title and date of publication of the document specified. www.cqc.org.uk Page 3 of 27 Internet address Care Homes for Older People Care Homes for Older People Page 4 of 27 Information about the care home Name of care home: Address: St James’s Lodge 74 Molesworth Road Stoke Plymouth Devon PL1 5PF 01752563003 01752605705 s.jl@btinternet.com www.mayhaven.com St Jamess Lodge Healthcare Ltd Mrs Fiona Miller Care Home 38 Telephone number: Fax number: Email address: Provider web address: Name of registered provider(s): Name of registered manager (if applicable): Type of registration: Number of places registered: Conditions of registration Category(ies): dementia mental disorder, excluding learning disability or dementia old age, not falling within any other category Additional conditions: Number of places (if applicable): Under 65 10 0 38 Over 65 0 38 0 The maximum number of service users who can be accommodated is 38. The registered person may provide the following category of service only: Care home with nursing - Code N to service users of either gender whose primary care needs on admission to the home are within the following categories: Old age not falling within any other category (Code OP) Physical disability aged over 40 or over on admission (Code PD)Dementia (Code DE) - maximum of 10 places Date of last inspection: Brief description of the care home: St James’s Lodge is a Care Home with Nursing that is registered to accommodate up to 38 people who require Nursing or Terminal Care. They may accommodate up to 10 people with dementia, but they do not offer a service to people with challenging behaviour. People who have a physical disability may be admitted over the age of 40. Care Homes for Older People Page 5 of 27 1 1 0 8 2 0 0 8 St James’s Lodge is a large Georgian property that has been extended to provide further bedrooms on the ground and first floor, and accessible bathrooms. It offers limited parking space within the front courtyard. The home is arranged over two floors, the first floor being reached by stairs or a fiveperson passenger lift. There are several separate communal areas on the ground floor and a well-maintained garden and patio area to the rear and side of the property. St James’s Lodge is in the Stoke area of Plymouth and is close to local amenities. It is on a bus route that goes directly into Plymouth City Centre. Up to date information about fees may be found on the homes web site www.mayhaven.com Care Homes for Older People Page 6 of 27 Summary This is an overview of what we found during the inspection. The quality rating for this care home is: three star excellent service How we did our inspection: The quality rating for this service is three stars. This means the people who use this service experience excellent quality outcomes. This inspection took place on 4th December 2009 and was unannounced. One inspector carried out the inspection, but the report is written as we, as it is done on behalf of the Care Quality Commission. Prior to the unannounced inspection we sent questionnaires to people who live at the home, and to people who work there. Four staff and seven residents returned these, some with help from visiting relatives. The Service Provider sent us their annual quality assurance assessment (AQAA) when we asked for it. The AQAA is a self-assessment that focuses on how well outcomes are being met for people using the service. It gave us some numerical information about the service. During our visit we spoke with the Registered Manager, and eight other staff members. We toured the premises and met with eight residents and two regular visitors in the Care Homes for Older People Page 7 of 27 lounges and dining room. We looked at care plans, and saw how medication is administered and recorded. We looked at staff recruitment records, training records and policies and procedures. We did this because we wanted to understand how well the safeguarding systems work and what this means for people who use the service. All this information helps us to develop a picture of what it is like to live at St.James’s Lodge. Care Homes for Older People Page 8 of 27 What the care home does well: What has improved since the last inspection? What they could do better: If you want to know what action the person responsible for this care home is taking following this report, you can contact them using the details on page 4. The report of this inspection is available from our website www.cqc.org.uk. Care Homes for Older People Page 9 of 27 You can get printed copies from enquiries@cqc.org.uk or by telephoning our order line – 0870 240 7535. Care Homes for Older People Page 10 of 27 Details of our findings Contents Choice of home (standards 1-6) Health and personal care (standards 7-11) Daily life and social activities (standards 12-15) Complaints and protection (standards 16-18) Environment (standards 19-26) Staffing (standards 27-30) Management and administration (standards 31-38) Outstanding statutory requirements Requirements and recommendations from this inspection Care Homes for Older People Page 11 of 27 Choice of home These are the outcomes that people staying in care homes should experience. They reflect the things that people have said are important to them: People are confident that the care home can support them. This is because there is an accurate assessment of their needs that they, or people close to them, have been involved in. This tells the home all about them and the support they need. People who stay at the home only for intermediate care, have a clear assessment that includes a plan on what they hope for and want to achieve when they return home. People can decide whether the care home can meet their support and accommodation needs. This is because they, or people close to them, have been able to visit the home and have got full, clear, accurate and up to date information about the home. If they decide to stay in the home they know about their rights and responsibilities because there is an easy to understand contract or statement of terms and conditions between them and the care home that includes how much they will pay and what the home provides for the money. This is what people staying in this care home experience: Judgement: People using the service experience good quality outcomes in this area. We have made this judgement using a range of evidence, including a visit to this service. Clear information about St.James’s Lodge is available to people who may want to use this service. Peoples needs are carefully assessed before accommodation is offered, to ensure the home is prepared and equipped to meet their needs. Evidence: The home owner had produced a full and detailed Statement of Purpose, giving information about the service and facilities. The website was in production. The Manager told us that she visits people in hospital to assess their care and support needs, before offering accommodation at St. James Lodge. She told us that the hospital discharge team will consider placing people at this home when there are complex needs, and dual diagnoses, such as a person with mental health needs who has a physical illness. They are also considered when end of life care is needed. This is because of their excellent track record in meeting complex needs, and because of the presence of nursing staff who are qualified in general nursing as well as Mental Health. Staff confirmed that they were told before the arrival of a new resident what their care plan entailed, and how long they were expected to stay. They were brought up to date with all details at the handover meeting when they came on duty. The Manager had observed that peoples capabilities often proved to be different when they had settled at St.Jamess Lodge from how they had been in hospital, so they have introduced an Care Homes for Older People Page 12 of 27 interim care plan, which is produced following admission to ensure the staff are given accurate information. Residents had been offered a bed in a shared room while awaiting a room of their own. The home provides a statement of terms, which includes a resident’s right to bring personal possessions with them. The Manager told us that they had by arrangement moved furniture out in order to make room for peoples’ own items. Care Homes for Older People Page 13 of 27 Health and personal care These are the outcomes that people staying in care homes should experience. They reflect the things that people have said are important to them: People’s health, personal and social care needs are met. The home has a plan of care that the person, or someone close to them, has been involved in making. If they take medicine, they manage it themselves if they can. If they cannot manage their medicine, the care home supports them with it, in a safe way. People’s right to privacy is respected and the support they get from staff is given in a way that maintains their dignity. This is what people staying in this care home experience: Judgement: People using the service experience excellent quality outcomes in this area. We have made this judgement using a range of evidence, including a visit to this service. Personal and health care are given with skill and reliability. Systems are in place to assure the consistency of this quality. Effective use was made of records and risk assessments. Evidence: Each resident had a care plan, written by one of the qualified staff, and reviewed monthly by the Manager. Families had been given the opportunity to share in this process, and some had signed to say they had read the up-dated plan and were in agreement. We examined a sample, and saw that they included risk assessments with respect to infection control, moving and handling, pressure areas, the need for bed guards, and vulnerability to pressure areas and need for skin care. All were checked monthly, up-dated, and action taken if risk factors were found to have increased. One former resident was very complimentary about the care they had received; Excellent staff - the recollection, they said, I was whisked into the shower every morning, meaning that they did not have to ask, the staff knew what they wanted. Staff are good at caring for people with complex wounds. A Senior member of staff had been given responsibility for overseeing wound care in the home. The Manager told us there were no pressure sores at this time. Systems were in place for care of people with Percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy (PEG) sites. We examined records and saw that risks were recorded, and dietician involved. Another qualified staff member had been given responsibility for overseeing continence care, and ensuring that correct equipment was made available by day and night. Transport to appointments was provided. The homes ability to care for people with diabetes was examined during a Random Care Homes for Older People Page 14 of 27 Inspection in August 2009, and found to be good. Registered Nurses have the relevant training and experience to deal with complex diabetes. We saw how medication was administered and looked at medication records. All was done with care and accuracy. The home had developed good working relationships with the local GP practice, who gave speedy reviews of medication, when peoples needs were changing. A payphone was available on a trolley so that people could make and receive private calls in their rooms. Care Homes for Older People Page 15 of 27 Daily life and social activities These are the outcomes that people staying in care homes should experience. They reflect the things that people have said are important to them: Each person is treated as an individual and the care home is responsive to his or her race, culture, religion, age, disability, gender and sexual orientation. They are part of their local community. The care home supports people to follow personal interests and activities. People are able to keep in touch with family, friends and representatives. They are as independent as they can be, lead their chosen lifestyle and have the opportunity to make the most of their abilities. People have nutritious and attractive meals and snacks, at a time and place to suit them. This is what people staying in this care home experience: Judgement: People using the service good quality outcomes in this area. We have made this judgement using a range of evidence, including a visit to this service. Peoples social needs are taken into consideration. Staff have time to engage with people, and were developing their skills to support people in a variety of ways. Provision of meals was very good. Evidence: There was a relaxed atmosphere in the home, with several residents receiving visitors during this inspection. Some residents were confined to their rooms due to ill health. Some had radios or televisions for stimulation, one had a projector to provide changing scenes on his wall, though we did not see this on operation. Of the seven people who returned surveys to us, three said they were unable to join in activities. We found that not all residents had their need for social engagement included in their care plan. However, we saw from the AQAA, that management are aware that they should aim to improve activities for those least able to take part. Staff were pleased to tell us that they had time to chat with people while in their rooms. Staff had attended training on dementia care and were excited by new ideas of how they could support people, including activities of daily life, to engage people throughout the day. A young person on work experience at the home was engaging with residents individually during the morning. Group activities were provided, for those able to join in. These included an exercise group, with a visiting leader who brought a tape to accompany the movements. We were told that a guitarist is another regular visitor, and an entertainer who brings poems to share. Care Homes for Older People Page 16 of 27 One regular visitor said they were very pleased with the home, and that they were made welcome, could help themselves to a drink, and had joined their relative for lunch. Another told us, I feel very comfortable here, and feel it is my second home now. The home had a minibus parked outside. There was a volunteer driver for outings and appointments, and a staff member also able to provide this service if necessary. People had been taken on a drive earlier in the week. The home owner told us that there were plans to purchase a new smaller minibus, enabling more frequent trips with small groups of service users. Some residents had enablers to support them to go out of the home, while several were taken out by family members. The home owner told us that staff had come in on their day off to take residents out, but that it was not currently part of their role. One resident had a communication book, with photos of places they liked to go. However, the activity record showed they had not been out since August. The Manager said they were hoping to obtain a befriender from a local voluntary organisation to enable this person to fulfill their goals. We met one resident who attended a Church regularly. They told us that the administrator ordered an accessible taxi for them, to enable them to go. Christmas preparations were being made at the time of this visit. We were told that staff were planning to dress up and present a pantomime, that a school choir was booked to come and sing carols, and there would be a party with mulled wine to which relatives were invited. Dietary provision at the home was found to be very good. The chef was able to provide choice in main courses as well as understanding and providing for special dietary needs. Low sugar diets were provided, and low fat and low sugar versions of the main course were provided to ensure that people had a healthy balanced diet. The chef ensured that people who needed to have their food blended also had a balanced and tasty diet. People were given a choice of porridge, cereals and toast for breakfast, and staff had detailed instructions for each one, including for some that they must be asked each day what they want. Cooked breakfasts could be provided. Im very happy here, said one resident, they bend over backwards; the food is very good. Care Homes for Older People Page 17 of 27 Complaints and protection These are the outcomes that people staying in care homes should experience. They reflect the things that people have said are important to them: If people have concerns with their care, they or people close to them know how to complain. Any concern is looked into and action taken to put things right. The care home safeguards people from abuse and neglect and takes action to follow up any allegations. This is what people staying in this care home experience: Judgement: People using the service experience good quality outcomes in this area. We have made this judgement using a range of evidence, including a visit to this service. Residents are protected by well trained and observant staff. Evidence: There was a complaints procedure available for residents and visitors, which specifies time scales in which a response will be given. The management team recognised that people had not always found their concerns had been heard sympathetically, and agreed to consult together when responding to complaints, in order to ensure that people feel their anxiety is understood. Staff had received training in the protection of vulnerable adults from abuse. This means that they will be competent in recognising any signs of abusive or neglectful behaviour. They knew how to take appropriate measures to prevent harm coming to the people who use this service. We made a random selection of staff personnel files and found that all the required checks including police checks and references had been completed correctly. The local arrangements that had been agreed with the Local Authority, called the Alerters Guidance, was available for staff in the policy file, and the administrator had the contact details for the local social service teams and the safeguarding team, so that staff would know who to contact in the event of any allegation of abuse being made. An incident in August led to the Manager contacting the safeguarding team, to ensure safety for a resident. This was good practice which led to contact and good communication between departments for the safety of all. Staff had received training on the new Deprivation of Liberty Safeguards, to give them awareness of the issues involved. No people currently needed these arrangements. Care Homes for Older People Page 18 of 27 Environment These are the outcomes that people staying in care homes should experience. They reflect the things that people have said are important to them: People stay in a safe and well-maintained home that is homely, clean, pleasant and hygienic. This is what people staying in this care home experience: Judgement: People using the service experience good quality outcomes in this area. We have made this judgement using a range of evidence, including a visit to this service. St. James’s Lodge provides a comfortable and attractive environment, with a choice of social spaces indoors and a lovely garden. The house is well maintained and well decorated. All equipment necessary to help with mobility, bathing, and good skin care is provided, according to assessed need. Evidence: We saw that the house was well maintained and decorated. The handyman was at work during the inspection. Staff reported any problems directly to him, recorded in a book. The communal space consists of a large hall, where we saw that some residents enjoyed sitting where they could see people coming and going. Leading off from this hall are a series of small lounges, all of which are open plan, and each area has its own television, one of which was a very large flat screen, donated by a family. Two of these areas are conservatory in style, hence were light and airy and caught the sun throughout most of the day. One of these was being used by the visiting hairdresser during our visit, which afforded a measure of privacy while remaining a social event. There was easy access to a lovely secluded garden. Tall fir trees gave it privacy from the city around, and different levels and an ornamental pond gave it interest. There was sturdy garden furniture, and residents confirmed that they had been happy to sit out when the weather was good. A new bathroom had been installed on the ground floor, fully tiled for good hygiene, and equipped with a specialist accessible bath. Each room had a call bell, as did the bathrooms and toilets. A new system had been installed to provide a printed record of calls made and answered. The specialised paper had not yet been obtained, but this important audit was expected to be in operation very soon. Since the last inspection, 24 new hospital beds had been provided, all hi-lo electric profiling, in order to suit the differing needs of residents, and make it easier and safer Care Homes for Older People Page 19 of 27 for staff to care for them well. Seventeen specialist mattresses had been provided, to further improve arrangements for dealing with peoples vulnerable pressure areas, to improve their comfort and well being. The provision of mobility aids had been improved, so that there were two standaids upstairs and one down, one Trixie hoist on each floor, and one hoist that was built to lift people of up to 35 stone. The home owner has produced a Statement of Purpose showing all the room sizes, and people are shown the room that is available before they move into St. James’s Lodge. The rooms are attractive and well decorated. There are six double rooms. The smaller of these might be considered more suitable as a single room. Occupants have either made a positive choice to share a room, or have chosen this option to be able to move to St. James’s Lodge, and are awaiting the availability of a single room. We saw the staff at work with the carpet cleaner. We found the house to be clean and sweet smelling throughout. A dedicated worker was employed to deal with the laundry, and showed us the good system in place for dealing with soiled articles. Two relatives in surveys told us that stains had not been removed from shirt fronts, which they felt had resulted in loss of dignity for people. The home owner told us that the laundry has a number of costly treatments for stain removal including an external bleach tub, vanish spray and soda crystals. Staff had received training in Control of infection, in order to maintain best practice in the home with respect to hygiene. Care Homes for Older People Page 20 of 27 Staffing These are the outcomes that people staying in care homes should experience. They reflect the things that people have said are important to them: People have safe and appropriate support as there are enough competent staff on duty at all times. They have confidence in the staff at the home because checks have been done to make sure that they are suitable to care for them. Their needs are met and they are cared for by staff who get the relevant training and support from their managers. This is what people staying in this care home experience: Judgement: People using the service experience excellent quality outcomes in this area. We have made this judgement using a range of evidence, including a visit to this service. Committed and reliable staff provide skilled care, well supervised. Recruitment practice is sound, and a wide range of training provided. Evidence: The Manager paid tribute to the exceptional commitment from all our members of staff, which she said enabled the team to provide such good care. A former resident who was visiting told us that the same staff were still here, showing good consistency. A relative said, All the staff are very professional and very caring - always ready to have a chat. During this visit there were four care assistants and two trained nurses working on the day shifts with the Registered Manager overseeing them. Additionally throughout the day there were other part time and full time support staff - a laundress, a cook, a kitchen assistant, three cleaners, a handyman, an administrator, a kitchen cleaner, and a supper cook. There is a twilight shift five days a week between 5pm and 9pm. Overnight one trained nurse and two care assistants are on duty, all of whom are awake for this shift. Seven service users returned surveys to us, and all said that they always receive the medical support they need, all but two said that staff are always available when they need them, and the other two said usually. One visitor who returned a survey said that they would appreciate it if the front door was opened sooner, and we experienced a long delay after ringing the doorbell. We spoke with a Care Assistant who said they enjoyed having time during their working day to talk with residents, while working with them in their rooms, and in the lounges. All who completed surveys said that the staff always listen to them and act on what they say. The recruitment procedure was seen to be carried out methodically, including younger workers, in order to protect vulnerable adults from potential harm. All checks which are needed to protect residents from potential harm had been carried out, and where permission to work in the UK was needed, this was available for inspection. A record Care Homes for Older People Page 21 of 27 was kept of peoples responses during interview, to demonstrate their aptitude and preparedness for this work, and any gaps that might need addressing during induction training. The trained nurses included both General Nurses and RMNs, by day and night. Care staff had either achieved NVQ2 in care or were working towards it, with several progressing to NVQ level three. The policy of the home was for all care staff to work towards level three. Staff told us they had found recent training in dementia care very interesting and useful. It had included communication skills. This had been a new focus for the team, and they were looking forward to further development in this area. It was an eye-opener, said one staff member, and helped us see how we could support people with dementia. Staff had also appreciated a three day course in palliative care from the local hospice. Trained nurses have had opportunities to attend courses in which they are interested. The expectation is that they feed back to the other care staff. The administrator printed out a record of the training provided in the past year, showing the extensive range of training provided. Nine staff had so far received training in Person Centred Dementia Care, all care staff. It would be good practice for all staff to enhance their understanding of dementia care, in particular good understanding and communication skills, whatever their role in the home. Care Homes for Older People Page 22 of 27 Management and administration These are the outcomes that people staying in care homes should experience. They reflect the things that people have said are important to them: People have confidence in the care home because it is led and managed appropriately. People control their own money and choose how they spend it. If they or someone close to them cannot manage their money, it is managed by the care home in their best interests. The environment is safe for people and staff because appropriate health and safety practices are carried out. This is what people staying in this care home experience: Judgement: People using the service experience excellent quality outcomes in this area. We have made this judgement using a range of evidence, including a visit to this service. The management of this home has been consistently excellent, and feedback from clients very favourable. Evidence: The Registered Manager is Mrs Fiona Miller. She is pro-active about keeping up to date with relevant legislation and ensuring that the home provides a service that meets the care needs of the residents. She is actively involved in the day-to-day running of the home and responsible for staffing and overseeing the provision of care. Her professional interest and development is in end of life care, and she contributes to a steering group locally. The home is now owned by St. James’s Lodge Ltd, with Mr James Sutherland registered with CQC as the Responsible Individual for the company. We did not meet the home owners during this visit, but we understand they are in daily contact with the Manager and frequently present in the home. The home had received questionnaires and feedback from families and friends, as well as outside agencies. We were told that they have an excellent reputation in the community. We recommend that a summary is made annually of the feedback, in a form that can be shared with residents and other interested people, and available for inspection. We also advised the home owners to consider how regulation 26 might best be met at St.James’s Lodge, which is in respect to quality audits and communication with people who live and people who work at the home. Records showed that 18 staff, representing all roles in the home, had attended fire safety training, in order that a safe response would be made in an emergency. Nine staff including care staff and the Manager, had updated their Moving and Care Homes for Older People Page 23 of 27 Handling training in September 09. The fire precaution system had been professionally serviced, in June 09. Windows on the upper floor were restricted from opening wide, to prevent accidents. Care Homes for Older People Page 24 of 27 Are there any outstanding requirements from the last inspection? Yes No Outstanding statutory requirements These are requirements that were set at the previous inspection, but have still not been met. They say what the registered person had to do to meet the Care Standards Act 2000, Care Homes Regulations 2001 and the National Minimum Standards. No. Standard Regulation Requirement Timescale for action Care Homes for Older People Page 25 of 27 Requirements and recommendations from this inspection Immediate requirements: These are immediate requirements that were set on the day we visited this care home. The registered person had to meet these within 48 hours. No. Standard Regulation Requirement Timescale for action Statutory requirements These requirements set out what the registered person must do to meet the Care Standards Act 2000, Care Homes Regulations 2001 and the National Minimum Standards. The registered person(s) must do this within the timescales we have set. No. Standard Regulation Requirement Timescale for action Recommendations These recommendations are taken from the best practice described in the National Minimum Standards and the registered person(s) should consider them as a way of improving their service. No. Refer to Standard Good Practice Recommendations Care Homes for Older People Page 26 of 27 Helpline: Telephone: 03000 616161 Email: enquiries@cqc.org.uk Web: www.cqc.org.uk We want people to be able to access this information. If you would like a summary in a different format or language please contact our helpline or go to our website. Copyright © (2009) Care Quality Commission (CQC). This publication may be reproduced in whole or in part, free of charge, in any format or medium provided that it is not used for commercial gain. This consent is subject to the material being reproduced accurately and on proviso that it is not used in a derogatory manner or misleading context. The material should be acknowledged as CQC copyright, with the title and date of publication of the document specified. Care Homes for Older People Page 27 of 27 - Please note that this information is included on www.bestcarehome.co.uk under license from the regulator. Re-publishing this information is in breach of the terms of use of that website. Discrete codes and changes have been inserted throughout the textual data shown on the site that will provide incontrovertable proof of copying in the event this information is re-published on other websites. The policy of www.bestcarehome.co.uk is to use all legal avenues to pursue such offenders, including recovery of costs. You have been warned!

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St James's Lodge 04/12/09

St James's Lodge 11/08/09

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